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 PIC900
TM
Hardware Manual
Version 13.0
Giddings & Lewis Controls, Measurement and Sensing
NOTE
Progress is an ongoing commitment at Giddings & Lewis. We continually strive to offer the most advanced products in the industry; therefore, information in this document is subject to change without notice. The illustrations and specifications are not binding in detail. Giddings & Lewis shall not be liable for any technical or editorial omissions occurring in this document, nor for any consequential or incidental damages resulting from the use of this document. DO NOT ATTEMPT to use any Giddings & Lewis product until the use of such product is completely understood. It is the responsibility of the user to make certain proper operation practices are understood. Giddings & Lewis products should be used only by qualified personnel and for the express purpose for which said products were designed. Should information not covered in this document be required, contact the Customer Service Department, Giddings & Lewis, 660 South Military Road, P.O. Box 1658, Fond du Lac, WI 54936-1658. Giddings & Lewis can be reached by telephone at (920) 921-7100.
Release 2002
(c) 1990-2002 Giddings & Lewis, Controls, Measurement, and Sensing, A Company of Thyssen Krupp Technologies
Belden(R) is a registered trademark of Cooper Industries, Inc. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corp. Microsoft(R) and MS-DOS(R) are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. MOD HUB is a trademark of Contemporary Control Systems, Inc. ARCNET(R) is a registered trademark of Datapoint Corporation. ST is a trademark of AT&T Bell Labs. TemposonicsTM is a trademark of MTS(R) Systems Corporation. DeviceNetTM is a trademark of Open DeviceNetTM Vendor Association, Inc. PIC900, PiC90, PiCPro, MMC, PiCServoPro, PiCTune, PiCProfile, PiCMicroTerm, and PiC Programming Pendant are registered trademarks of Giddings & Lewis.
Table of Contents: PIC900 Hardware Manual
CHAPTER 1- PIC900 Hardware Setup General Precautions ..................................................................................... 1.0 System Safety...................................................................................... 1.1 Overview of the PIC900 system.......................................................... 1.2 The System Rack................................................................................. Dimensions of the Racks ........................................................................ 1.3 System rack power and environment requirements ............................ General Requirements ............................................................................. Control Cabinet Specifications ............................................................... Power Distribution Diagrams ................................................................. Grounding the System ............................................................................. Controlling Heat Within the System ....................................................... 1.4 Hardware Modules .............................................................................. Types of Modules ................................................................................... Installing a Module in the Rack ............................................ 1.5 Wiring the System to the Application ................................................. Making a Wiring Worksheet ................................................................... Making the I/O Connections ................................................................... 1.6 Preventing Electrical Noise in Data Lines .......................................... 1.7 Starting an Operation .......................................................................... 1.8 Troubleshooting .................................................................................. Power-On Diagnostics ............................................................................ Run-Time Diagnostics ............................................................................ 1-1 1-2 1-8 1-10 1-10 1-13 1-13 1-13 1-13 1-15 1-16 1-17 1-19 1-20 1-22 1-22 1-22 1-24 1-27 1-27 1-28 1-30
Appendix A - PiC Control Modules
A.1-PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... CSM Time-of-Day Clock ............................................................................. LEDs ............................................................................................................. Replacing the Battery on the CSM .............................................................. Specification Table ...................................................................... A.2-PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00) A.3 -CPU - 91X (Document 108-31044-00) A.4 -PiC90 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31045-00) A1-1 A1-2 A1-2 A1-3 A1-3 A1-4 A1-6
TOC-1
A.5 -RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver Introduction................................................................................................... Connections ................................................................................................ LEDs ............................................................................................................. Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ............................................................................. A.6 -CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo Introduction................................................................................................... Connections .............................................................................................. Serial Ports .............................................................................................. ARCNET and I/O Expansion ............................................... LEDs ......................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... EPROM for the PiC94X ......................................................................... PIC900 Memory Organization...................................................................... Procedure for Installing an EPROM into the Socket ................................... A.7 -PiC9011/9012 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31046-00) A.8 -PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Serial Ports .............................................................................................. Peer-to-Peer (ARCNET) and Block I/O Expansion (Optional) LEDs ............................................................................................................. Status LEDs ............................................................................................ Communication LEDs ............................................................................ CSM/CPU Time-of-Day Clock..................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Application in Flash...................................................................................... Replacing the Battery on the CSM/CPU ...................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... A8-1 A8-2 A8-2 A8-3 A8-5 A8-5 A8-6 A8-7 A8-7 A8-8 A8-8 A8-10 A5-1 A5-2 A5-3 A5-5 A5-5 A6-1 A6-2 A6-2 A6-2 A6-5 A6-6 A6-6 A6-7 A6-9
Appendix B - Communication Modules
B.1 - I/O Driver Module Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... LEDs ............................................................................................................. Specification Table ...................................................................................... B.2 -Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of operation....................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... B1-1 B1-2 B1-3 B1-4 B2-1 B2-2 B2-7 B2-8
TOC-2
B.3 -DeviceNetTM Module Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... The DeviceNet Port ................................................................................. The Configuration (RS232) Port ............................................................. LEDs ....................................................................................................... Theory of operation....................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... B.4 -ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... The Ethernet Ports ................................................................................... The RS232 COMM Ports ........................................................................ LEDs ....................................................................................................... Theory of operation....................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... Useful Internet Links .................................................................................... B.5 -Profibus Module Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... The Profibus Port .................................................................................... The Configuration (RS232) Port ............................................................. LEDs ....................................................................................................... Theory of operation....................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... B3-1 B3-2 B3-2 B3-3 B3-3 B3-4 B3-5 B4-1 B4-2 B4-5 B4-6 B4-6 B4-7 B4-8 B4-9 B5-1 B5-2 B5-2 B5-3 B5-3 B5-4 B5-5
Appendix C - Discrete I/O Modules
C.1 -Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Protecting from an Inductive Load ............................................................... External Zener Diode on 16 Point Module ............................................. Replacing a fuse............................................................................................ Specification Table ...................................................................................... C.2 -Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... C1-3 C1-4 C1-7 C1-7 C1-8 C1-9 C1-11 C2-1 C2-2 C2-6 C2-8
TOC-3
C.3 -Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Protecting from an Inductive Load ............................................................... Replacing a Fuse ........................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... C.4 -Input 120V AC Module (16 points) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... C.5 -Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Protecting from an Inductive Load ............................................................... Replacing a Fuse ........................................................................................... Specification Table ...................................................................................... C.6 -Output Relay Module (8 points) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... C.7 -Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... C.8 -Input 12V DC Module (32 points) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... C.9 -24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Protecting from an Inductive Load ............................................................... Replacing a Fuse ........................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... C3-1 C3-2 C3-5 C3-5 C3-7 C3-9 C4-1 C4-2 C4-4 C4-6 C5-1 C5-2 C5-5 C5-6 C5-7 C5-9 C6-1 C6-2 C6-4 C6-5 C7-1 C7-2 C7-6 C7-7 C8-1 C8-2 C8-5 C8-5 C9-1 C9-2 C9-6 C9-9 C9-10 C9-12
TOC-4
C.10 -24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Replacing a fuse............................................................................................ Specification Table ....................................................................................... C.11 -Input Switch Module (16 switches) Introduction................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table .................................................................................. C10-1 C10-2 C10-5 C10-8 C10-11 C11-1 C11-1 C11-2
Appendix D - Servo/Feedback Modules
D.1 -Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Encoder Drivers ............................................................................................ Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification table......................................................................................... D.2 -Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Resolvers....................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... D.3 -Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Resolvers....................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... D.4 -Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Analog Output Connections.......................................................................... Analog Input Connections ............................................................................ Encoder Connections .................................................................................... Encoder Drivers ...................................................................................... Analog Output Theory of Operation............................................................. Analog Input Theory of Operation ............................................................... Encoder Theory of Operation ....................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... D1-1 D1-2 D1-4 D1-7 D1-9 D2-1 D2-2 D2-4 D2-5 D2-6 D3-1 D3-3 D3-6 D3-6 D3-7 D4-1 D4-2 D4-4 D4-5 D4-9 D4-9 D4-13 D4-13 D4-14 D4-15
TOC-5
D.5 -Servo Module Encoder Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Analog Output Connections.......................................................................... Encoder Connections .................................................................................... Encoder Drivers ............................................................................................ Analog Output Theory of Operation............................................................. Encoder Theory of Operation ....................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... D.6 -Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Connecting the SMCM to Stepper Drives .................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ...................................................................................... D.7 -Slider Driver Module Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ..................................................................................... D.8 -SERCOS Module Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... Specification Table for the Fiber Optic Cable .............................................. D.9 -Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Connecting the SAM to Stepper Drives........................................................ Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ...................................................................................... D5-1 D5-2 D5-4 D5-4 D5-5 D5-8 D5-9 D5-10 D6-1 D6-2 D6-5 D6-10 D6-11 D7-1 D7-2 D7-6 D7-7 D8-1 D8-2 D8-3 D8-4 D8-6 D9-1 D9-2 D9-5 D9-10 D9-11
Appendix E - Analog Modules
E.1 -Input Analog Module (8 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ...................................................................................... E1-1 E1-2 E1-7 E1-8
TOC-6
E.2 -Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Thermocouple Precautions............................................................................ Specification Table ....................................................................................... E.3 -Input RTD Module (6 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... RTD Precautions........................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... E.4 -Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Analog Output Receiving Devices................................................................ Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... E.5 -Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Theory of Operation...................................................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... E.6 -Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel) Introduction................................................................................................... Connections................................................................................................... Analog Output Connections.......................................................................... Analog Input Connections ............................................................................ Analog Output Theory of Operation............................................................. Analog Input Theory of Operation ............................................................... Specification Table ....................................................................................... E2-1 E2-2 E2-6 E2-6 E2-7 E3-1 E3-2 E3-4 E3-5 E3-5 E4-1 E4-2 E4-3 E4-3 E4-4 E5-1 E5-2 E5-4 E5-5 E6-1 E6-2 E6-4 E6-4 E6-7 E6-7 E6-8
Appendix G - Barrier Module
G1 - Barrier Module Barrier Module for Empty Slot ..................................................................... G-3
Appendix H - Wiring Worksheets
TOC-7
H.1 -Wiring Worksheets Output 24 V DC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet ........................................ Output 24 V DC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet ............................................ Input 24V DC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet ............................................... Input 24V DC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet ............................................... Output 120/240V AC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet .................................. Output 120/240V AC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet ................................... Input 120V AC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet ............................................ Output 10V DC (8 ch) Wiring Worksheet ............................................ Output 10V DC (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ............................................ Input Encoder (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ................................................. Input Encoder (2 ch) Wiring Worksheet .......................................... Input Resolver (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ................................................ Input Resolver (2 ch) Wiring Worksheet ................................................ Input Analog (8 ch) Wiring Worksheet .................................................. Thermocouple TEMP J-K (12 ch) Wiring Worksheet ......................... Output 24 V DC Sink (32 pt, 1 to 16 diode protected) Wiring Worksheet Output 24 V DC Sink (32 pt all diode protected) Wiring Worksheet .... Input RTD (6 ch) Wiring Worksheet ..................................................... Serial Communications (2,4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ............................... Output 4-20mA (6 ch) Wiring Worksheet .............................................. Output Stepper (8 ch) Wiring Worksheet ............................................... Output Relay (8 pt) Wiring Worksheet ................................................... Input Resolver (12 ch) Wiring Worksheet .............................................. Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts) Wiring Worksheet .................................... Input 12V DC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet ............................................... Input/Output 24V DC (16/8 sink pt) Wiring Worksheet ........................ Input/Output 24V DC (16/8 source pt) Wiring Worksheet .................... Servo Encoder (3 ch) Analog input (4 ch) Analog output (2 ch) ........... Servo Encoder (3 ch) Analog output (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ............. Analog input (4 ch)/Analog output (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ................ Slider/Driver Wiring Worksheet ............................................................. Block Output 24V DC Source (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet ...................... Block Input 24V DC Module (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet ....................... Block Input Analog (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ........................................ Block Output 4-20 mA (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet .................................. Block 24V DC 8 in/8 out Wiring Worksheet .......................................... Input Resolver (6 ch) Wiring Worksheet ................................................ Output Stepper/Input Encoder/Input 24V DC Wiring Worksheet .......... Output Analog 10V DC (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet ............................... H-3 H-4 H-5 H-6 H-7 H-8 H-9 H-10 H-11 H-12 H-13 H-14 H-15 H-16 H-17 H-18 H-19 H-20 H-21 H-22 H-23 H-24 H-25 H-26 H-27 H-28 H-29 H-30 H-31 H-32 H-33 H-34 H-35 H-36 H-37 H-38 H-39 H-40 H-41
TOC-8
Appendix I - Wiring Jig
I.1 - A Wiring Jig Making a jig .................................................................................................. Using a jig ..................................................................................................... I-3 I-4
Appendix J - Power-on Circuitry
J.1 -Power-on Circuitry Wiring One Axis to Power-On Circuitry ...................................................... J-3
Appendix K - Math Coprocessor Installation
K.1 -Math Coprocessor Installation (Document 108-31047-00) Description of Archived Document .............................................................. K-3
Appendix L - Flash Memory Installation
L.1 -Flash Memory Installation Installation of Flash Memory Board ............................................................. L-3
Appendix M - Diagnostic LED Error Codes
M.1 -Diagnostic LED Error Codes Error Codes ................................................................................................... M-3
Appendix N - Communication Connections
N.1 -Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections Establishing Communications ...................................................................... Communication Topologies.......................................................................... Bus Topology .......................................................................................... Star Topology .......................................................................................... Distributed Star Topology ....................................................................... Distributed Star/Bus Topology ............................................................... Connecting PiCs up to 400 feet - Bus Topology .................................... Expanding with Active Hubs ........................................................................ Connectors .............................................................................................. N.2 -I/O Expansion Connections Expansion Racks........................................................................................... Local I/O Expansion .................................................................................... Remote I/O Expansion.................................................................................. Fiber Optic Cables .................................................................................. Peer-to-Peer and Remote I/O Expansion ...................................................... Specification Table for Fiber Optic Cable .................................................... Block I/O Expansion..................................................................................... LEDs ....................................................................................................... N1-2 N1-3 N1-3 N1-3 N1-4 N1-4 N1-5 N1-8 N1-8 N2-1 N2-2 N2-5 N2-6 N2-9 N2-11 N2-12 N2-13
TOC-9
Appendix O - EMC Guidelines
O.1 -CE and EMC Guidelines Background on EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) Compliance........... Background on Low Voltage Compliance .............................................. RFI Emission and Immunity ................................................................... Classes of EMC Operating Environments .............................................. Conformance with the EMC Directive ................................................... Conformance with the Low Voltage Directive ....................................... Changes to the PiC Products ................................................................... Changes Affecting the User .................................................................... Using CE/EMC and Non-CE/EMC Modules ......................................... Index O-3 O-3 O-4 O-5 O-5 O-6 O-6 O-7 O-10
TOC-10
Part Number List
502-03510-XX 502-03512-XX 502-03518-XX 502-03548-XX 502-03549-XX 502-03550-XX 502-03551-XX 502-03552-XX 502-03605-XX 502-03638-XX 502-03640-XX 502-03641-XX 502-03642-XX 502-03643-XX 502-03644-XX 502-03651-XX 502-03657-XX 502-03658-XX 502-03673-XX 502-03674-XX 502-03676-XX 502-03677-XX 502-03679-XX 502-03680-XX 502-03681-XX 502-03722-XX 502-03732-XX 502-03782-XX 502-03786-XX 502-03794-00 502-03809-XX 502-03810-XX 502-03813-XX 502-03814-XX 502-03817-XX See "PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00)" on page A.2-1. See "PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module" on page A.1-1. See "Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel)" on page E.4 -1. See "Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)" on page C.2 -1. See "Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)" on page C.1 -3. See "Input 120V AC Module (16 points)" on page C.4 -1. See "Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)" on page C.3 -1. See "Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)" on page D.2 -1. See "Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)" on page C.2 -1. See "PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00)" on page A.2-1. See "Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)" on page C.1 -3. See "Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)" on page C.3 -1. See "Input Analog Module (8 channel)" on page E.1 -1. See "Input 12V DC Module (32 points)" on page C.8 -1. See "Output Relay Module (8 points)" on page C.6 -1. See "Input Switch Module (16 switches)" on page C.11 -1. See "I/O Driver Module" on page B.1 -1. See "Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)" on page E.2 -1. See "Barrier Module" on page G1 -3. See "Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)" on page C.5 -1. See "Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)" on page B.2 -1. See "Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)" on page D.6 -1. See "Input RTD Module (6 channel)" on page E.3 -1. See "PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00)" on page A.2-1. See "Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel)" on page E.5 -1. See "Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)" on page D.3 -1. See "PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module" on page A.1-1. See "Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)" on page D.1 -1. See "PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00)" on page A.2-1. See "Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)" on page E.2 -1. See "Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)" on page C.7 -1. See "PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module" on page A.1-1. See "PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00)" on page A.2-1. See "PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module" on page A.1-1.
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502-03839-XX 502-03840-XX 502-03842-XX 502-03843-XX 502-03846-XX 502-03853-XX 502-03876-XX 502-03907-XX 502-03941-XX 502-03944-XX 502-03947-XX 502-03956-XX 502-03963-XX 502-03973-XX 502-03994-XX 502-04011-XX 502-04050-XX 502-04071-XX 502-04073-XX 502-04080-XX 502-04081-XX 502-04077-XX 502-04104-XX 502-04110-XX 502-04111-XX 502-04112-00 502-04125-XX 502-04126-XX 502-04157-XX 502-04317-XX 503-25906-XX 503-25907-XX 503-25908-XX 503-25909-XX 503-25910-XX 503-25986-XX 503-25987-XX 503-25988-XX
See "Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input" on page D.4 -1. See "Servo Module Encoder" on page D.5 -1. See "24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)" on page C.10 -1. See "24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)" on page C.9 -1. See "PiC90 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31045-00)" on page A.4 -1. See "RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver" on page A.5 -1. See "Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)" on page E.6 -1. See "CPU - 91X (Document 108-31044-00)" on page A.3 -1. See "SERCOS Module" on page D.8-1. See "Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)" on page D.1 -1. See "Slider Driver Module" on page D.7 -1. See "CPU - 91X (Document 108-31044-00)" on page A.3 -1. See "PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module" on page A.1-1. See "CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo" on page A.6 -1. See "CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo" on page A.6 -1. See "Input Analog Module (8 channel)" on page E.1 -1. See "PiC9011/9012 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31046-00)" on page A.7 -1.
See "Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)" on page D.9 -1. See "PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit" on page A.8 -1. See "CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo" on page A.6 -1. See "PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit" on page A.8 -1. See "DeviceNetTM Module" on page B.3 -1. See "ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module" on page B.4 -1. See "Block 24V DC 8 In/8 Out Module" on page C.14 -1. See "Block Input 24V DC Module (16 points)" on page C.13 -1. See "Block Output 24V DC Source Module (16 points)" on page C.12 -1. See "Block Input Analog Module (4 channel)" on page E.7 -1. See "Block Output 4-20mA Module (4 channel)" on page E.8-1. See "Block Input Resolver Module (6 channel)" on page D.10 -1. See "Block Output 10V DC Module (4 channel)" on page E.9 -1. See "Block Output Stepper/Input Encoder/Input 24V DC Module (2/2/2 Ch)" on page D.11 -1.
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CHAPTER 1
PIC900 Hardware Setup
Generally throughout this manual, the PIC900 refers to the PIC900 family of programmable industrial computers and includes the PiC90.
General Precautions
READ AND UNDERSTAND THIS SECTION IN ITS ENTIRETY BEFORE UNDERTAKING INSTALLATION OR ADJUSTMENT OF PiC CONTROL EQUIPMENT
The advice contained in this section will help users to operate and maintain the equipment in a safe manner at all times.
PLEASE REMEMBER THAT SAFETY IS EVERYONE'S RESPONSIBILITY
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1-1
1.0
System Safety
The basic rules of safety set forth in this section are intended as a guide for the safe operation of equipment. This general safety information, along with explicit service, maintenance and operational materials, make up the complete instruction set. All personnel who operate, service or are involved with this equipment in any way should become totally familiar with this information prior to operating.
User Responsibility
It is the responsibility of the buyer to ensure that the procedures set forth here are followed and, should any major deviation or change in use from the original specifications be required, appropriate procedures should be established for the continued safe operation of the system. It is strongly recommended that you contact your OEM to ensure that the system can be safely converted for its new use and continue to operate in a safe manner.
Safety Instructions
1. Do not operate your equipment with safety devices bypassed or doors removed. 2. Only qualified personnel should operate the equipment. 3. Never perform service or maintenance while automatic control sequences are in operation. 4. To avoid shock or serious injury, only qualified personnel should perform maintenance on the system. 5. ATTENTION - DANGER TO LIFE Do not touch the main power supply fuses or any components internal to the power modules while the main power supply switch is ON. Note that when the main power switch is OFF, the incoming supply cable may be live. 6. GROUNDING (Protective Earth) The equipment must be grounded (connected to the protective earth connection) according to OEM recommendations and to the latest local regulations for electrical safety. The grounding (protective earth) conductor must not be interrupted inside or outside the equipment enclosures. The wire used for equipment grounding (connection to protective earth) should be green with a yellow stripe. 7. If there is any doubt at all as to the safety of the equipment, you should set the main power switch to OFF and contact your OEM for advice.
1-2
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Safety Signs
The purpose of a system of safety signs is to draw attention to objects and situations which could affect personal or plant safety. It should be noted that the use of safety signs does not replace the need for appropriate accident prevention measures. Always read and follow the instructions based upon the level of hazard or potential danger.
Warning Labels
Danger Electric Shock Risk
Hazard warning. When you see this safety sign on a system, it gives a warning of a hazard or possibility of a hazard existing. The type of warning is given by the pictorial representation on the sign plus text if used. The safety color is black on a yellow background with a black symbol. To ignore such a caution could lead to severe injury or death arising from an unsafe practice. If voltage levels are included in the text they must indicate the maximum level of the hazard in normal or fault condition. Danger, Warning, or Caution warning. Symbol plus DANGER, WARNING or CAUTION: These notices provide information intended to prevent potential personal injury and equipment damage. Hot Surface warning
Hot Surface
Safety First
Giddings & Lewis equipment is designed and manufactured with consideration and care to generally accepted safety standards. However, the proper and safe performance of the equipment depends upon the use of sound and prudent operating, maintenance and servicing procedures by trained personnel under adequate supervision. For your protection, and the protection of others, learn and always follow these safety rules. Observe warnings on machines and act accordingly. Form safe work-
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1-3
ing habits by reading the rules and abiding by them. Keep these safety rules handy and review them from time to time to refresh your understanding of them.
Safety Inspection Before Starting Operations
1. Ensure that all guards and safety devices are installed and operative and all doors which carry warning labels are closed and locked. 2. Ensure that all personnel are clear of those areas indicated as potentially hazardous. 3. Remove (from the operating zone) any materials, tools or other objects that could cause injury to personnel or damage the system. 4. Make sure that the control system is in an operational condition. 5. Make certain that all indicating lights, horns, pressure gauges or other safety devices or indicators are in working order.
After Shutdown
Make certain all controlled equipment in the plant is safe and the associated electrical, pneumatic or hydraulic power is turned off. It is permissible for the control equipment contained in enclosures to remain energized provided this does not conflict with the safety instructions found in this section.
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Operating Safely 1. Do not operate the control system until you read and understand the operating
instructions and become thoroughly familiar with the system and the controls. 2. Never operate the control system while a safety device or guard is removed or disconnected 3. Where access to the control system is permitted for manual operation, only those doors which provide that access should be unlocked. They should be locked immediately after the particular operation is completed. 4. Never remove warnings that are displayed on the equipment. Torn or worn labels should be replaced. 5. Do not start the control system until all personnel in the area have been warned. 6. Never sit or stand on anything that might cause you to fall onto the control equipment or its peripheral equipment. 7. Horseplay around the control system and its associated equipment is dangerous and should be prohibited. 8. Know the emergency stop procedure for the system. 9. For maximum protection when carrying out major servicing requiring the system to be powered down, the power source should be locked using a lock for which only you have the key. This prevents anyone from accidentally turning on the power while you are servicing the equipment. 10. Never operate the equipment outside specification limits. 11. Keep alert and observe indicator lights, system messages and warnings that are displayed on the system. 12. Do not operate faulty or damaged equipment. Make certain proper service and maintenance procedures have been performed.
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Electrical Service & Maintenance Safety
1. ALL ELECTRICAL OR ELECTRONIC MAINTENANCE AND SERVICE SHOULD BE PERFORMED BY TRAINED AND AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY. 2. It should be assumed at all times that the POWER is ON and all conditions treated as live. This practice assures a cautious approach which may prevent accident or injury. 3. To remove power: LOCK THE MAIN SWITCH IN THE OPEN POSITION. USE A LOCK TO WHICH ONLY YOU HAVE THE KEY. 4. Make sure the circuit is safe by using the proper test equipment. Check test equipment regularly 5. Capacitors take time to discharge. Care should be taken in manual discharging of capacitors 6. There may be circumstances where troubleshooting on live equipment is required. Under such conditions, special precautions must be taken: a. Make sure your tools and body are clear of the areas of equipment which may be live. b. Extra safety measures should be taken in damp areas. c. Be alert and avoid any outside distractions. d. Make certain another qualified person is in attendance. 7. Before applying power to any equipment, make certain that all personnel are clear of associated equipment. 8. Control panel doors should be unlocked only when checking out electrical equipment or wiring. On completion, close and lock panel doors. 9. All covers on junction panels should be fastened closed before leaving any job. 10. Never operate any controls while others are performing maintenance on the system. 11. Do not bypass a safety device. 12. Always use the proper tool for the job. 13. Replace the main supply fuses only when electrical power is OFF (locked out).
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Cleaning Safely Manual cleaning Procedure
1. Do not use toxic or flammable solvents to clean control system hardware. 2. Turn off electrical power (lock out) before cleaning control system assemblies. 3. Keep electrical panel covers closed and power off when cleaning an enclosure. 4. Always clean up spills around the equipment immediately after they occur. 5. Never attempt to clean a control system while it is operating. 6. Never use water to clean control equipment unless you are certain that the equipment has been certified as sealed against water ingress. Water is a very good conductor of electricity and the single largest cause of death by electrocution.
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1.1
Overview of the PIC900 system
The PiC(Programmable industrial Computer) 900 system is a combination of hardware and software that allows you to control an application to your specifications. A Central Processing Unit (CPU) integrates the hardware and software elements. 1. Hardware consists of a system rack, hardware modules, and the I/O connections to the application. All hardware is modular. This makes the PIC900 hardware easy to configure. The PIC900 is designed to interact with a computer workstation and/or an operator interface device. However, the application may be programmed to execute without either device.
Figure 1. The PIC900 system hardware
CSM
CPU
AA101-0890
NOTE: The CSM and CPU modules are combined into one physical module in the PiC90 system. This combination module is referred to as the CSM/CPU module in this manual. 2. Software is covered in the Software manual. It consists of: * A software module (application program) created using PiCPro. It is designed to control a specific application. * The PiCServoPro development tools installed on your computer workstation. The tools include PiCPro, ServoSetup, and SERCOS setup.
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Figure 2. Diagram of the PIC900 system in operation
Computer Workstation using PiCPro / PiCServoPro and Application programs (optional)
PiC 900
CSM CPU INPUT OUTPUT ENCODER OUTPUT +10 RESOLVER
G&L PIC900TM
1 4 7 .
2 5 8 0
3 6 9 +/-
EN
Operator Interface Devices (optional)
Motor Drive
(POSITION LOOP)
Machine Inputs/Outputs
Machine Servos/ Feedback Devices
AA102-1890
3. A combination of hardware and software run an application. Hardware input modules accept data from the application. Data is processed as specified in the software application program. Commands generated by the program instructions are sent to the application by hardware output modules. Data sent to the workstation by the PiC allows an operator to monitor and modify the application using PiCPro commands.
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1.2
The System Rack
The system rack has four functions: 1. It provides physical support for the top and bottom of each hardware module.
2. It passes power from the CSM (or CSM/CPU)to each of the other modules. 3. It contains a data bus, address bus and control lines. These lines allow data to pass between the CPU (or CSM/CPU) module and each of the other modules. 4. It has a 64-pin female connector at each slot position which allows communication between modules. Dimensions of the Racks
PIC900 system racks differ only in length and the number of hardware modules they can contain. A dimensional diagram of each rack is shown on the following pages.
Number of actual slots Number of modules PIC900 Depth (with modules) Part Number
Length
Height
13 10 7
CSM, CPU, 11 I/O CSM, CPU, 8 I/O CSM, CPU, 5 I/O CSM/CPU, 4 I/O CSM/CPU, 2 I/O
21.6" 16.8" 12.0" 8.8" 5.6"
14.0" 14.0" 14.0" 14.0" 14.0"
9.0" 9.0" 9.0" 9.0" 9.0"
503-18011-03 503-18010-03 503-18009-03 503-19184-02 503-19185-02
PiC90
5* 3*
*The PiC90 retaining bar labels the CSM/CPU module slot as 1/2, leaving 2 or 4 slots available for I/O modules. In Figure 1-3, racks with 3, 5, and 7 slots are shown with modules inserted. All racks are the same height and have the same profile. The other two rack sizes are shown empty (Figures 1-4 and 1-5).
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Figure 3. System racks with modules installed
PiC90 Slots 3 and 4 available for hardware modules
.365"/9.3 mm 2.8"
71 mm
PiC90 Slots 3, 4, 5, and 6 available for .365"/9.3 mm hardware modules
1/2 CSM/CPU
3 I/O
4 I/O
1/2 CSM/CPU
3 I/O
4 I/O
5
6
Servo Servo
13.375"/340mm
14.0"/355mm
2.3" .265"/6.7mm
58.4 mm
13.375"/340mm
14.0"/355mm
6"/152mm .265"/6.7mm
1.4"/35.6 mm
5.6"/142mm
1.4"/35.6 mm
8.8"/224mm
.365"/9.3 mm
PIC900 Slots 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 available for hardware modules
CSM
CPU
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
13.375"/340mm
14.0" / 355mm
Side View All racks
9.2" / 234mm
.265"/6.7mm
9.0" / 229mm
1.4"/35.6 mm
12.0" / 305mm
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1-11
Figure 4. The 10-slot system rack
.365"/9.3 mm
13.375"/340mm
14.0" / 355mm
7.0" / 178mm
.265"/6.7mm
1.4"/35.6 mm
14.0" / 356mm 16.8" / 427mm
Figure 5. The 13-slot system rack
.365"/9.3 mm
13.375"/340mm
14.0" / 355mm
9.4" / 239mm
.265"/6.7mm
18.8" / 478mm 21.6" / 549mm
1.4"/35.6 mm
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1.3
System rack power and environment requirements
General Requirements
You are not required to install the system rack in a control cabinet. However a cabinet protects the system from dust and mechanical damage and is recommended. Two methods of power distribution are shown. The one in Figure 1-6 works in most situations. For installations where electrical noise is severe, Figure 1-7 illustrates a setup with filtered AC power. In both cases, Install the system rack away from all sources of strong electromagnetic noise. Such noise can interfere with PIC900 operation. * Protect the PIC900 system away from all the following:
*
conductive fluids and particles corrosive atmosphere explosive atmosphere The diagrams and recommendations may be modified if necessary so the wiring conforms to current NEC standards or government regulations. NOTE: All PiC modules are presently rated for operation between 7C and 55C. The PIC900/90 is suitable for operation in a pollution degree 2 environment (i.e., normally, only non-conductive pollution occurs).
Control Cabinet Specifications
1. A control cabinet for the PIC900 should have a NEMA-12 rating or better. A cabinet
with this rating protects its contents from dust and mechanical damage. 2. It must be large enough to provide adequate air circulation for the system rack, drives, and other components. You must have at least 2" free space within the cabinet on all sides of the system rack. 3. It must have a rigid vertical surface to mount the rack on. 4. The door should open fully for easy access.
IMPORTANT Post warnings according to National, State, or local codes for the voltage present in the control cabinet.
Power Distribution Diagrams
The PIC900 system requires one AC power source for the system rack and its modules and one or more AC and/or DC sources for the connections to the I/O devices. Figures 1-6 and 1-7 show two ways to provide all necessary power in one setup.
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1-13
Figure 6. Example of 115V AC basic power distribution to a PIC900 system
PIC900 module CUSTOMER'S 24 VDC POWER SUPPLY + to DC I/O
ON OFF L / LINE 1 N / LINE 2 E / GRND
to AC I/O
115V AC
Line1 (HOT) Line2 (COMMON) ground (protective earthing connection) PLANT GROUND
MAIN DISCONNECT
(Grounds from other devices)
AC outlet
SINGLE-POINT GROUND (SPG) To COMPUTER WORKSTATION or other DEVICE CHASSIS GROUND from another PIC900 GROUND CONTROL CABINET
The AC power source is connected to the PIC900 system through a 3-pin female connector. It plugs into the power connector of the CSM (or CSM/CPU). The ground from the power source and "GRND" (protective earthing ground) from the CSM (or CSM/CPU) module must be connected to the Single-Point Ground (SPG). Devices connected to the hardware modules must have their own power sources for input data or output control signals. Both versions of the power distribution setup provide properly grounded AC and DC sources that can be used for such devices. You can use other wiring setups, provided that each one is: at the correct voltage and current levels for the module and the device. * connected to the same Single-Point Ground that the system rack uses.
*
It is recommended that the same main disconnect switch be used for the PIC900 system and for all devices in the application. NOTE: This main (primary) disconnect switch must have a minimum contact separation of 3 mm in all poles to meet requirements of the Low Voltage directive (73/23/EEC). IMPORTANT No matter how the system is installed, before you replace a module or connect it to the application, make sure that power is off to the system rack and to the devices the modules are wired to.
1-14 Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
The basic power distribution may be modified if the AC power source is subject to severe voltage spikes and surges. In many installations, a control transformer rated at a minimum of 0.5 KVA and a noise filter such as Islatrol model I-115/U may have been installed in series with the AC power source. Even though this model has worked successfully in the past, it is not CE approved. To meet the requirement of the Low Voltage Directive (73/23/EEC), a CE approved filter must be used. Control Concepts has an "Elite" series of Islatrol filters that have this CE approval. Filtered power distribution is recommended for most applications. It will prolong the life of the control. It should always be used when using communication and/or analog hardware.
Figure 7. Example of 115V AC filtered power distribution to a PIC900 system
PIC900 module CUSTOMER'S 24 VDC POWER SUPPLY + to DC I/O
ON OFF L / LINE 1 N / LINE 2 E / GRND
to AC I/O
115V AC
Line1 (HOT) Line2 (COMMON) Ground PLANT GROUND
MAIN DISCONNECT
1:1 TRANSFORMER
ISLATROL FILTER
(Grounds from other devices)
AC outlet
SINGLE-POINT GROUND (SPG) 12" maximum GROUND from another PIC900 CONTROL CABINET CHASSIS GROUND To WORKSTATION or other DEVICE
AA105-1093
Grounding the System
The ground of the PIC900 system power source must be connected directly to a Single Point Ground (SPG) tie block. The tie block should be made of brass or copper, bolted or brazed to the control cabinet. If the tie block is bolted rather than brazed, scrape away paint or grease at the point of contact. Put star washers between the tie block and the cabinet to ensure good electrical contact. Metal enclosures of power supplies, drives, etc., should also have good electrical contact with the SPG.
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1-15
CAUTION The Single Point Ground should be the only common point for all the ground lines. If not, ground loops may cause current flow between components of the system which can interfere with proper operation of the PIC900.
Devices to be connected directly to the Single Point Ground include:
1. Plant safety ground. 2. Ground (GRND - protective earthing connection) from CSM: the green/yellow wire. 3. "Common" or "0 V" lines from power supplies that provide external power to the I/O modules and the devices to which they are connected. 4. Chassis grounds from the devices themselves, such as device drivers, machinery, and operator interface devices. 5. AC common line from the noise filter, if any. 6. The ground of the power source of the computer workstation, if any, from which you monitor the system operation. An AC outlet in the control cabinet is recommended. See Figure 1-6 or 1-7. 7. Single point grounds from other control cabinets, if any, in the PIC900 system. 8. Shielded I/O wires. Shielded I/O wiring is recommended for use with analog output, encoder interface, and resolver interface modules.
Controlling Heat Within the System
The hardware module cases and the system rack are designed to promote air circulation and dissipate heat. The rack must be mounted vertically to take advantage of this design. Normally no fans or air conditioners are needed. However, if the environment outside the control cabinet is hot or humid, you may need to use a fan, heat exchanger, dehumidifier or air conditioner to provide the correct operating environment. Table 1-1. Operating Limits for the System Rack Temperature Relative humidity 7 to 55 C (45 to 131 F) 0 to 95%, non-condensing
Make sure that components installed in the cabinet with the rack do not raise the temperature above system limits and that any hot spots do not exceed specifications. For instance, when heat-generating components such as transformers, drives or motor controls are installed, separate them from the system by one of the following:
1-16 Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Place them near the top of the control cabinet so their heat output rises away from the PIC900 system. * Put them in another control cabinet above or to one side of the cabinet with the system rack. This protects the PIC900 system from both heat and electrical noise.
*
The PIC900 system itself is a source of heat, though in most installations its heat dissipates without harmful effects. System heat is generated from power dissipated by: 1. the power supply 2. logic side components on each hardware module installed in the system 3. field side input/output components on each module If you need to calculate total heat generated by a particular setup, refer to Appendixes for the specifications of each hardware module you have installed.
CAUTION If the PIC900 system is operated outside the recommended limits, the rack or the modules installed in it may be damaged. This will void the warranty.
1.4 Hardware Modules
All modules except the CSM and CSM/CPU have identical dimensions so they can be physically placed in any slot in the system rack. The CSM and CSM/CPU are 2.4" wide instead of 1.6", but its length and depth, and the rack connector in the back, are the same as the other modules.
IMPORTANT The CSM or CSM/CPU must be placed in the first slot on the left of the system rack. * In the PIC900, the CPU module must be in the second slot. * All I/O modules may be assigned by the application program to any other slot.
*
The face of each hardware module is in two segments. The upper segment identifies the type of module and gives LED status information. Every module has a DIAG LED which is discussed at the end of this section. LEDs that give status for specific modules are explained in Appendixes.
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup 1-17
The lower segment contains a screw terminal connector that allows you to wire inputs or outputs of the PIC900 to specific parts of the application. A door swings shut to protect these connections. The bosses and vents on the side allow free circulation of air within the system (Figure 1-8).
Figure 8. Front and Right Side of a Module
LATCH
OUTPUT 10V DC DIAG
AIR VENTS
DOOR 64 PIN MALE CONNECTOR
9.5" 241mm
12.0" 305mm
AIR VENTS FOOT 1.6" 41mm 8.4" 213mm
AA112-0890
Handling a Module
The module's case protects its internal circuitry against mechanical damage in shipping and handling. However, like any electronics device, the circuitry can be destroyed by:
* * * * *
temperatures over 55 C (131 F) moisture condensing inside the module static discharge exposure to a magnetic field strong enough to induce a current in the circuitry freezing temperatures, vibration, and other hazards
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Normally there is no need to open a module case. Occasionally you must replace a battery or a fuse. Modules with replaceable components have a diagram and detailed anti-static precautions in the appendixes. IMPORTANT It is good practice to keep the module in the system rack or in an antistatic bag at all times.
Types of Modules
Each module has its name printed at the top of the front face, separated by colorcoded bands from the rest of the upper segment. The colors identify which of the four main categories the module belongs to. silver - CSM, CPU, CSM/CPU, I/O driver, relay output modules blue - DC I/O red - AC I/O green - servo/analog I/O Power comes through the AC input plug. It is then converted to DC power. There is an internal battery back-up. See diagrams and specifications in the appendixes. All the other modules are powered from the CSM (or CSM/CPU) which sends specific DC voltages through the system rack. In the PIC900, the CPU module contains a Central Processing Unit and several kinds of memory. It uses power from the CSM to control the application, integrating the hardware and software components of the PIC900 system. See the diagrams and specifications in Appendixes. The CPU module is always in the second slot, next to the CSM. In the PiC90, these two modules are combined into the CSM/CPU. Several models of the PiC9X have the capability to communicate between PIC900s and/or perform I/O expansion. With the PiC90, there is an optional peer-to-peer communications port on the CSM/CPU. The I/O Driver Module for connecting expansion racks to a master rack is covered in Appendix B2. Several types of I/O modules are available. Refer to the Table of Contents for a complete listing of all I/O modules available. An input module accepts signals that convey status information. An output module sends commands to the application. An I/O module has either 25 or 40 screw terminal connections. Each screw terminal is assigned to a specific function. This is illustrated in a wiring diagram in each module write-up in the appendixes. Some connections are used for the external power supply, and others for data signals. Modules that use differential signals have paired terminals for data and other terminals assigned as shield commons.
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup 1-19
Installing a Module in the Rack
CAUTION ALWAYS turn off power at the main disconnect switch before installing, removing or wiring a module. To install a module in the system rack (Figure 1-9), follow these steps: 1. Loosen the thumbscrews on the metal retaining bar at the top of the rack. 2. Set the foot of the module in the J-Clip near the bottom of the rack (1) and rotate the module until the latch snaps into the slot near the top of the system rack (2). The connection between the male 64-pin connector on the module and the female one on the system rack is complete. 3. Tighten the thumbscrews on the retaining bar to hold modules securely in place (4).
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Figure 9. Steps in the procedure
RETAINING BAR with thumbscrew 4
MODULE
MODULE 2
SYSTEM RACK
SYSTEM RACK
3
1
AA113-0890
IMPORTANT Always loosen the thumbscrews on the retaining bar before attempting to install or remove modules from the system rack. Tighten the thumbscrews firmly after all modules are installed.
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1.5
Wiring the System to the Application
The screw terminal connectors on each I/O module allow you to connect the PIC900 system with the application. You need two kinds of information about the terminal assignments in order to wire a module correctly: 1. the screw assignment diagram for that module, found in the appendixes
2. the inputs and outputs assigned to run this specific application supplied by the software application program
Each signal to or from a module takes the form of a voltage which is powered by external AC or DC sources (that is, not from the system rack). Figures 1-6 and 1-7 illustrated AC and DC power distribution.
Making a Wiring Worksheet
You can make a set of wiring worksheets for each application program. Appendix H has a wiring worksheet for each I/O module. Make a copy of the appropriate worksheet for each I/O slot in the system rack. * Copy the input or output connection wire numbers or signal names that came with the software program onto the worksheets. Check each one carefully. Note: power supply signals may be daisy-chained. * A label is supplied for the inside of the module door on which to enter the wire name of each screw terminal. Copy the wire name onto the worksheet for future reference.
* Making the I/O Connections
The acceptable range of wire sizes is 20 (.5 mm2) to 14 (2 mm2) gauge. Use copper wire. * The shield wire is not insulated. Do not leave bare wire exposed. Protect bare wiring with one of the following:
*
spaghetti tubing tape shrink tubing NOTE: All wires/cables connected to the PiC must be mechanically secured against undue stress and must be suitably rated and approved for the voltage and conditions of use. Install the modules in the system rack before you start the I/O wiring. Make sure the wires are the correct length. When the wiring is complete the connectors should not be stressed. You may find that a wiring jig makes the job easier; instructions for making one are given in Appendix I. * Strip 0.2" (5.1 mm) of insulation from the end of the wire.
*
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
*
Start wiring at the bottom left screw terminal. Work up the left (inner) column. Then continue with the lowest terminal in the column on the right, and work up. (See Figure 1-10.)
Figure 10. How to Wire a Screw Terminal
Screw terminal connector (front)
Retention Screw*
1
3 5
Screw terminal connections (left side)
7 9 11
13 15
17 19
21 23 25
Retention Screw*
*Do not overtighten retention screws on the screw terminal connectors.
AA114-1093
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1-23
IMPORTANT Make sure all screws are tight when adding wires or when probing unwired terminals. If the screw head is not fully tightened, there is no electrical connection between the screw head and the circuitry on the module.
1.6 Preventing Electrical Noise in Data Lines
The PIC900 system relies on electrical signals to report what is going on in the application and to send commands to it. In addition, signals are constantly being exchanged within the system. The PIC900 is designed for use in industrial environments, but there are limits to how much noise it can tolerate. Some suggestions are given below to reduce electrical noise. 1. Keep electrically noisy devices away from the PIC900.
2. Reduce noise generated by the application itself. 3. Protect data signals from noise. 4. Use differential devices for analog and encoder signals.
CAUTION Errors in data transmission in a PIC900 system may cause malfunctions in the application. Any device or wire that generates or uses electricity can create electrical noise in nearby circuits or devices. 'Nearby' is a relative term: an arc welder can create noise problems for many feet in all directions - including the room above. When one device's currents affect another device, they are said to be coupled. Coupling between a pair of wires running parallel to each other is directly proportional to the length of the parallel portion and inversely proportional to the distance between them.
Keep Noisy Devices Away from the PIC900.
Make sure that arc welding equipment, heavy duty motors, and other devices that use large amounts of current and their power lines are at least 10 feet away from the PIC900 and the devices connected to it.
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Shield all cables that carry heavy current near the system, using continuous foil wrap or conduit grounded at both ends. Such cables include power leads for highfrequency welders and for pulse-width-modulation motor drives.
Reduce Noise Generated by the Application Itself.
Equip inductive devices that are not directly connected to PIC900 modules with arc suppression circuits. These devices include contactors, solenoids and motors. Wires in the system which carry high current should be routed away from data lines that are sensitive to noise. AC, DC, communications, and analog cables must not be bundled together inside or outside the control cabinet. See Figure 1-11.
Protect Data Wires from Noise
Install the system rack as close to the application as you can. Short communications lines are less affected by noise than long ones. Make all connections to the Single-Point Ground as short as possible, and use 14 gauge or larger wire for these connections. Route data lines 6" or more away from power lines or run them through separate conduit. Communications lines, for example those that use RS232, RS422 or biphase transformer mode signals, should also be shielded. In Figure 1-11 the communications data lines and the encoder/resolver/analog data lines are each in a separate conduit, grounded at the SPG.
Figure 11. Power and signal cables from the system
COMMUNICATIONS
PIC900 SYSTEM and MODULES
ENCODER, ANALOG AC INPUT/OUTPUT DC INPUT/OUTPUT to AC I/O to DC I/O
+
AC INPUT POWER GND SINGLE-POINT GROUND
-
DC POWER SUPPLY
AA107-0890
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1-25
Use Differential Devices for Analog and Encoder Signals
A differential device receives or sends one signal over two wires (typically a shielded twisted pair). The input/output voltage at the second terminal is the inverse of the first. Information is received/sent as the difference between the two voltages. A single-ended device effectively receives or sends data over only one line. Information is received/sent as the difference between the signal voltage and the device's ground potential.
Figure 12. Differential vs. Single-Ended Digital Pulse Train
SIGNAL AT A INVERTED SIGNAL AT A
SIGNAL AT A INPUT AT A TIED TO +
DIFFERENTIAL
SINGLE-ENDED
The advantages of using differential signals are: 1. A differential signal is less susceptible to electromagnetic noise. Static or other interference affects both of the twisted-pair wires equally, so the difference between the normal and inverted voltage remains unchanged. A differential signal can be transmitted over a much longer distance or in a much noisier environment than a single-ended one. A single-ended device's signal can be affected by noise while the ground to which it is compared is not. The receiver cannot tell the difference between a pulse from the sending device that carries information and a pulse created by noise on the line. 2. PIC900 hardware circuitry can detect signal loss from an encoder if the signal is differential, but not if it is single-ended. The application program can be set to shut down the application if such an error is detected.
IMPORTANT Use differential drivers or differential inputs if possible. If singleended devices must be used, keep the distance between the device and the PIC900 less than 10 feet.
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Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1.7
Starting an Operation
Good procedure suggests that the system should be tested each time a new application is powered up. Each module in the PIC900 rack is tested automatically every time power is applied. The DIAG LED on each module should be off indicating that the module passed the diagnostic tests.
Installing and Testing the Hardware Modules
1. Insert the CSM (or CSM/CPU) into the first slot at the left end of the system rack. 2. With the PIC900, insert the CPU module into the second slot next to the CSM. 3. Turn off the main disconnect switch and plug the AC connector into the power connector. Turn on input power and the power switch (see the power distribution diagrams). The DIAG LED turns on and then turns off when the module passes its diagnostic tests. With the PIC900, the DIAG LED on the CPU module repeats these steps. Turn off the power switch and the main disconnect switch. 4. Slide the I/O modules into the appropriate slots designated in the software program.
Connecting the PIC900 System to the Application
1. Turn off the main disconnect switch in the control cabinet. If some devices are not powered from the control cabinet, turn them off also. 2. Connect the screw terminal connectors according to your diagrams. 3. Turn on power to the system and the power switch. The PWR light goes on and stays on. The DIAG light on each module goes on, then goes off in turn. Turn the key clockwise. The SCAN light goes on. The application starts to work under control of the system. 4. If an application program is not in system memory, the Software manual describes a number of procedures that may be used to put it there.
1.8 Troubleshooting
Table 1-2 summarizes how to proceed when performing certain maintenance and/ or setup functions.
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1-27
Table 1-2. Summary In order to: Turn off the entire application. Turn off main disconnect in the AC input line (which should also turn off all external power supplies to the application), and the power switch; unplug the AC power. Turn off main disconnect in the AC input line and the power switch; unplug the AC power. Turn off main disconnect in the AC input line. Turn off main disconnect in the AC input line.
Wire the I/O modules to the application.
Replace a module in the rack. Change a fuse in an output module. Change the battery.
Connect/disconnect the PIC900 with the Turn off the power switch. computer workstation through the PiCPro port. Connect/disconnect the PIC900 with an operator interface through the User port. Turn off the power switch.
Download an application program into the Make sure power is on (check the PWR CPU module memory. LED). The Run key may be off or on. Stop the scan. From the workstation - use PiCPro commands. From the PIC900 - turn off the RUN/STOP switch.
This section covers two types of diagnostics; power-on and run-time.
Power-On Diagnostics
When the system is powered up, it tests itself and reports the results of the tests in the form of LED signals. Power LED If the PWR light does not go on, or goes off during operation of the system, check that power is still connected to the CSM (or CSM/CPU). If it is, turn off the main disconnect switch and replace the CSM (or CSM/CPU) Scan LED If the SCAN LED does not go on: Check that the PWR light is ON. * Check that the DIAG lights on all modules are OFF. * Check that the key switch is in the Run position.
*
1-28
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
If the application program is in RAM, turn off the Run key, download the program again from the workstation, and turn on the key. * If the program is in an EPROM, make sure the it is correctly installed. See Appendix A2 for the PIC900 and A4 for the PiC90.
*
Diagnostic LEDs Each module has an LED marked DIAG which lights up briefly while its diagnostic tests are running and then goes off. If the DIAG LED on any module remains on, the module has failed one of its tests. Follow these steps: 1. Turn off power to the system and to the application. 2. If the I/O wiring is connected, remove the screw terminal connector from the module, but leave its wiring attached. 3. Pull the defective module from the rack. 4. Insert a replacement module of the same type in the rack. Replace the screw terminal connector on the new module. 5. Turn on power to check diagnostics again.
NOTE Diagnostics are run only when the system is powered up. It is possible that a module might fail during operation. If so, its DIAG light remains off. If you suspect that a module might be defective, cycle power to run diagnostics again. If the diagnostic LEDs remain lit on one or more of the modules, there may be something wrong with the CSM or CPU module (or the CSM/CPU). Follow these steps in tracing the problem: 1. Turn off the main disconnect switch in the control cabinet and any other power to the application. 2. Remove all modules except the CPU and CSM (or the CSM/CPU). 3. Turn on the power to run diagnostics again. 4. With the PIC900, if both LEDs stay lit, turn off power, replace either the CSM or the CPU module and turn on power. If LEDs remain lit, put original module back in and replace the other module. With the PiC90, replace the CSM/CPU module. 5. If the problem is not the CSM or CPU (or the CSM/CPU) module, turn off power, replace one of the I/O modules, and turn on power to run its diagnostics. Repeat until you find the defective module.
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
1-29
6. If the problem can not be traced to a module, check the I/O wiring and the devices the system is connected to. There may be a short or other problem outside the system rack.
Run-Time Diagnostics
While the PIC900 is running, other tests are performed on a regular basis with their results also reported to you through LEDs. *If the BATT LED on the CSM or CSM/CPU starts flashing, the battery must be replaced. See Appendix A1 for the PIC900 and A4 for the PiC90. *If the FB LED on one of the output modules goes on, a fuse must be replaced. See the section on the specific module in Appendixes for details. *While the PIC900 is running, the DIAG LED on the CPU or the CSM/CPU will flash a three digit code signal if there is an error. For example, if there is a long pause-flash-pause-flash-flash-pause-flash-flash-flash-long pause, the code is 123. The errors are described in Appendix M.
1-30
Chapter 1 PIC900 Hardware Setup
Appendix A - PiC Control Modules
A.1-PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
Introduction
The Central Service Module (CSM) and the Remote Service Module (RSM) convert incoming power to regulated DC power. Through the bus, the CSM supplies this power to the modules in the master rack and the RSM supplies this power to the modules in an expansion rack. The CSM has the following additional features: Scan control which includes a key switch to run/stop the scan when power is on. * A lithium battery to back up such items as non-volatile RAM in the CPU module and the time-of-day clock on the CSM module when power is turned off. * An internal clock to provide time of day and date when needed by the software.
*
The CSM and the RSM must always be located in the first slot on the left in the master rack and expansion rack respectively.
Figure A1-1. CSM/RSM RSM - the Remote Service Module CSM - the Central Service Module
(for master rack) (for expansion rack)
CSM
Name of modu
DIAG PWR SCAN BATT
RSM
Name of module
DIAG PWR SCAN
LEDs
LEDs
Run Stop GIDDINGS & LEWIS
Programmable industrial Controlle
Key slot
Run Stop
(Key slot not used)
Door
Door
ON OFF
Power switch
ON OFF
Power switch
L / LINE1 N / LINE2 E / GRND
L / LINE1
Power connec
N / LINE2 E / GRND
Power connector
AA21-489
AA1092-4892
A.1-1
PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
Connections
The CSM and RSM modules receive power through a 3-pin power connector. Figure A1-2 illustrates the connections as listed below.
Module AC Power Source 110VAC AC Power Source 220VAC DC Power Source 24VDC
L / LINE 1
to Hot
Line1 Line2 Single Point Ground
+24V -24V Single Point Ground
N / LINE 2 to Common E / GRND to Single Point Ground
Figure A1-2. Power to the System
CSM/RSM Module
ON OFF L / LINE 1 N / LINE 2 E / GRND SPG
Power Source
110V AC 220V AC 24V DC HOT Line 1 +24V DC COMMON Line 2 -24V DC GROUND GROUND GROUND
(protective earthing connection)
Theory of Operation
The CSM (RSM) module converts incoming input power into DC power at voltages of + 5V, + 15 V, and - 15 V and supplies them to the logic side of the modules in the rack. External power supplies are used for the field side of the I/O modules. Such supplies are not routed through the CSM (RSM), but they should all have the same power cut-off switch as the PIC900. See the power distribution diagrams in Chapter 1. CAUTION The on/off rocker switch on the face of the CSM (RSM) does not control the I/O power supplies. Always shut off power at the main disconnect switch before you replace a module in the system rack. With the CSM, a key is supplied to protect the system from unauthorized start-ups. You can set up the PIC900 hardware, power up and run the diagnostic tests, and even load a software application program without the system key. However, the application program will not be scanned until you turn the Run/Stop key on the CSM to the Run position.
A.1-2
PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
CSM Time-of-Day Clock
An internal clock IC maintains the current date and time. If power is off to the system, the battery maintains the clock. The application program and PiCPro can access this clock. Details are given in the Software Manual.
LEDs
DIAG, diagnostic LED
The DIAG LED should turn on briefly whenever power is turned on to the system. The processor in the CPU module automatically runs diagnostic tests on all modules at power up. This LED goes on during testing, and then turns off when the module passes all the tests.
Status LEDs
The CSM has four LEDs to indicate status. During normal operation the DIAG and BATT LEDs should be off, and the PWR and SCAN LEDs should be on. The RSM has three LEDs to indicate status. During normal operation the DIAG LED should be off, and PWR and SCAN LEDs should be on.
PWR, power LED
The PWR light should be on all the time that power is on to the system. It indicates that the + 5V supply is within tolerance. See the specification sheet at the end of the section.
SCAN, scan LED
The SCAN light indicates that the processor is executing the application program. If scan loss occurs the light will go off and there is an orderly shutdown procedure.
CSM BATT, battery LED
The BATT light should turn on briefly while the battery is checked at power-on. After the battery passes its test, the LED goes off. If the BATT LED starts flashing either at start-up or during system operation, the lithium battery must be replaced. Each module that uses the battery to back up its data has circuitry that can maintain its data for approximately two hours if the CSM is not in the system rack. Power must be on for at least five minutes to ensure that modules that require backup power will retain their data while the CSM is out of the system rack.
A.1-3
PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
Replacing the Battery on the CSM
Follow the procedure below to replace a battery.
1.
After AC power has been applied to the CSM for at least five minutes, turn off power at the control cabinet main disconnect switch and at the CSM power switch. Unplug the AC input power connector from the CSM. Remove the CSM module from the rack by pressing down the latch at the top and pulling it out. Use a static-free work surface if possible. Ground yourself using a properly grounded wrist strap before you open the case. These are standard precautions before handling any electronics component. Lay the CSM on the work surface with its label side up. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module case toward each other and lift the side off.
2. 3.
4.
WARNING DO NOT touch any of the capacitors. Do not touch the pins on any of the ICs; even with precautions against static you may destroy the circuitry.
5.
Use Figure A1-3 to locate the battery. Note how it is oriented.
A.1-4
PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
Figure A1-3. Battery Location in CSM Module
DIAG LED PWR LED SCAN LED BATT LED
BATTERY
+
Battery Clip
CAP
POWER
SUPPLY
6.
Use an insulated screwdriver to pry out one end of the battery clip. Remove the clip. Lift the battery out. Replace it with a 3V, 2/3A lithium battery. (See the specification sheet at the end of this section.) Replace the clip ensuring that it is latched. Close the case and insert the CSM in the rack. Connect the power cable. Turn on power and check the LEDs.
7.
A.1-5
PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
Specification Table
Characteristic
CSM/RSM specifications
Functions AC power source Part numbers DC power source Part number Input connector
Supplies regulated DC power to the hardware modules installed in the rack 110-230 VAC, 47-63 Hz, 2A 502-03512-03 CSM-50 502-03732-03 RSM-50 20 - 60 VDC, 5A 502-03973-00 CSM-50 (24VDC) 3-terminal plug connector, meets all specifications for touch safety in accordance with IEC 529 and DIN VDE 0470 part 1 CSM/RSM-50 50 W + 5 V @4.0 A + 15 V@2.0 A -15 V @0.5 A CSM/RSM-60 60 W + 5 V@8.5 A +15V@1.5 A -15V@1.5 A CSM 24VDC 50W 5V @ 4.0 A +15V @ 1.0 A -15V @ 0.5 A 502-03813-03 CSM-60 502-03817-03 RSM-60
Power output, total Individual outputs
Battery (CSM only)
CAUTION for Lithium Batteries
1.2 Ah 3V, 2/3A lithium battery 401-52446-00
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Dispose of used batterries according to the manufacturers instructions. + 5 V supply monitor Trip points 5% .5%: 4.725 to 4.775V and 5.225 to 5.275 V PWR LED goes off and PIC900 shuts down Trip points 8% 2%: 13.5 to 14.1 V and 15.9 to 16.5 V Access via PiCPro or application program. At 25 C, 1 second per day Over temperature, voltage and aging variation, +2/-12 seconds per day 25 mA 2 mA 2 mA 2 A @ +5V @ +15V @ -15V @ +3V
15 V supply monitor Time-of-day clock (CSM only) Clock tolerance (CSM only)
Logic side power requirements (typical)
(from battery during power down on CSM)
Operating temperature range
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F)
A.1-6
PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
-40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed (CSM/RSM-50) Physical size
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers
2.4" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 61 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
A.1-7
PIC900 CSM/RSM Central Service Module/Remote Service Module
NOTES
A.1-8
A.2-PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00)
(This document is archived and available from Giddings & Lewis by requesting part number 108-31043-00.)
A.2-1
PIC900 CPU - (Document 108-31043-00)
NOTE
A.2-2
A.3 -
CPU - 91X (Document 108-31044-00)
(This document is archived and available from Giddings & Lewis by requesting part number 108-31044-00.)
A.3 -1
CPU - 91X (Document 108-31044-00)
NOTE
A.3 -2
A.4 -
PiC90 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31045-00)
(This document is archived and available from Giddings & Lewis by requesting part number 108-31045-00.)
A.4 -1
PiC90 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31045-00)
NOTE
A.4 -2
A.5 -
RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver
Introduction
When a PiC90 3- or 5- slot rack is used as a remote or local expansion rack for a PIC900 master rack, an RSM I/O driver module is required in slot 1/2 of the PiC90 rack. (Each PiC90 used as an expansion rack must have an RSM I/O module.) The RSM I/O driver module converts AC power to regulated DC power. Through the bus, the RSM supplies this power to the modules in an expansion rack. Refer to Appendix N2 for information on I/O expansion connections. The DIAG LED turns on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure A5-1. RSM I/O - the Remote Service Module I/O Driver (for 3- or 5- Slot PiC90 Expansion Rack)
RSM I/O
Name of module
DIAG PWR/SCAN CONFIG DATA IN/OUT
LEDs
Run Stop
(Key slot not used)
ON
Power switch
OFF
L / LINE1 N / LINE2 E / GRND
Power connector
I/O local expansion twisted pair out I/O local expansion twisted pair in Twisted pair shield
Door
In
Out
Fiber optic connections
A.5 -1
RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver
Connections
The RSM I/O driver module receives power through a 3-pin power connector. Figure A5-2 illustrates the connections as listed below.
Module AC Power Source
L / LINE 1 N / LINE 2 E / GRND
to Hot to Common to Single Point Ground
Figure A5-2. AC power to the system
CSM/RSM/RSM I/O Modules
ON OFF L / LINE 1 N / LINE 2 E / GRND SPG
AC Power Source
Line 1 (HOT) Line 2 (COMMON) GROUND
AA22-4892
The pinout for the 6-pin I/O driver connector is shown in Figure A5-3. This connector is used for local I/O expansion using twisted pair wire. The top two connections are for the I/O expansion twisted pair out. The next two are for the I/O expansion twisted pair in. The fifth connection is a shield used with twisted pair wire. The sixth connection is not used. Remote I/O expansion uses fiber optic cable connected to the fiber optic connectors shown in Figure A5-1. NOTE: It is possible to combine local and remote expansion racks in the same system. Use twisted pair wiring to connect racks that are up to 40 feet apart and use fiber optic cable to connect racks that are up to 2000 feet apart.
EMC NOTE To ensure EMC compliance, use fiber optic cables only. In some applications using only local expansion racks, it may be possible to comply to EMC standards when using shielded twisted pair wires. Verification would have to be done on a system by system basis.
A.5 -2
RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver
Figure A5-3. Pinout for the I/O driver twisted pair connector
I/O expansion twisted pair out I/O expansion twisted pair in
+ + -
Shield - Used with twisted pair wire Not Used
CAUTION The system is polarity dependent. Always connect the positive (+) output of one module to the positive (+) input of the next and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc. Always connect the positive (+) input of one module to the positive (+) output of the next and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc.
LEDs
The RSM I/O driver module has six LEDs to indicate status. They are shown in Figure A5-4.
Figure A5-3. RSM I/O driver LEDs
Diagnostic Power Scan This rack configured I/O expansion line activity out I/O expansion line activity in
DIAG PWR/SCAN CONFIG DATA IN/OUT
A.5 -3
RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver
DIAG
Diagnostic
On
The DIAG LED goes on when power is on and testing is performed by the CPU in the master rack. NOTE: The processor in the CPU module automatically runs diagnostic tests on all modules in an I/O expansion loop at power up. It turns off when the module passes all the tests. During normal operation the DIAG LED should be off. The PWR light should be on whenever power is on. It indicates that the + 5V supply is within tolerance. See the specification sheet at the end of the section. During normal operation the PWR LED should be on. No power on The SCAN light indicates that the application program is being executed. During normal operation the SCAN LED should be on. If scan loss occurs the light will go off and there is an orderly shutdown procedure. Communication established with this expansion rack connected in an I/O expansion loop. Communication not established
Off PWR Power On
Off SCAN Scan On
Off CONFIG This rack configured On Off DATA IN
I/O expansion line Dull Indicates the line receiving in is active. activity in glow Off No activity in
DATA OUT
I/O expansion line Dull Indicates the line transmitting out is active. activity out glow Off No activity out
NOTE: The diagnostic LED on the CPU module flashes certain error codes connected with I/O expansion. These codes are listed in Appendix M.
A.5 -4
RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver
Theory of Operation
The RSM I/O driver module converts AC input power into DC power at voltages of + 5V, + 15 V, and - 15 V and supplies them to the logic side of the modules in the rack. External power supplies are used for the field side of the I/O modules. Such supplies are not routed through the RSM I/O driver module, but they should all have the same power cut-off switch as the PIC900. See the power distribution diagrams in the Hardware chapter..
CAUTION The on/off rocker switch on the face of the RSM I/O driver module does not control the I/O power supplies. Always shut off power at the main disconnect switch before you replace a module in the system rack.
Specification Table Characteristic RSM I/O driver specifications
Functions
Supplies regulated DC power to the hardware modules installed in the rack Allows additional racks of I/O modules to be connected to a PIC900 master rack 502-03876-02 110-230 VAC, 47-63 Hz 3-terminal plug connector, meets all specifications for touch safety in accordance with IEC 529 and DIN VDE 0470 part 1 40 W + 5 V @ 5.0 A + 15 V @ 2.0 A -15 V @ .5 A Trip points 5% .5%: 4.725 to 4.775V and 5.225 to 5.275 V PWR LED goes off and PIC900 shuts down Communication capabilities in the master rack 510 mA @ +5V
Part number AC power source Input connector
Power output, total Individual outputs
+ 5 V supply monitor
PiC9XX CPU module Logic side power requirements (typical)
A.5 -5
RSM I/O - Remote Service Module I/O Driver
Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 2.4" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 61 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
A.5 -6
A.6 -
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Introduction
The PiC94X Turbo CPU module controls the PIC900 system and executes the application program. It contains:
A processor IC providing overall control A math coprocessor Eight LEDs as shown in Figure A6-1 RAM (EPROM optional) memory for the application program and for RAMDISK RAM memory for data storage as the system runs FLASH memory for the system software RS232 ports to communicate with the computer workstation and with a serial interface device * Optional communication (ARCNET and I/O expansion) capability * Optional flash memory system (FMS) for storing things like application source modules * * * * * * *
The CPU module must always be in the second slot from the left in the system rack.
Figure A6-1. PiC94X Turbo CPU Module
CPU
Name of module Diagnostic LED I/O expansion LEDs ARCNET LEDs User Port LEDs
TURBO PIC900
ARCNET, local, and block I/O expansion
RS232 port, to computer workstation
RS232 User Port, to serial interface device
Fiber Optic Connections Remote I/O expansion
A.6 -1
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Connections
Serial Ports
The PiCPro Port (9-pin D connector) communicates with the workstation serial port and the User Port (10-pin screw terminal connector) communicates with an optional serial interface device.
Figure A6-2. Pinouts for the Two RS232 Communications Ports
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 User Port - 12 VDC (50 mA max.) + 12 VDC (50 mA max.) + 5 VDC (50 mA max.) DTR = Data terminal ready RTS = Request to send NC = Not Connected CTS = Clear to send GRD = ground Receive data Transmit data
GRD 5 DTR (output) 4 Transmit Data (output) 3 Receive Data (input) 2 + 5 VDC (output) 1 (50 mA max.)
(50 mA max.) 9 (output) - 12 VDC 8 NC = Not Connected 7 (output) RTS 6 (output) + 12 VDC (50 mA max.)
Outputs
Inputs Output
AA27-1390
PiCPro Port
The PiCPro Port allows the PIC900 to communicate with the workstation. This port is used when downloading an application program from the workstation into RAM memory. It may also be used to exchange data between the workstation and the PIC900 system while the PIC900 system is running. The pinout for the PiCPro Port cable is shown below.
PiCPro Cable Pinout 9-pin female 9-pin female (to PC) (to PiCPro Port)
3 2 5
to to
RD TD
2 3
to GND 5
NOTE: Other pins may be connected in the cable recieved from Giddings & Lewis, but only pins 2, 3, and 5 are used. The User Port is used to communicate with a touch-screen, a hand-held controller, or other serial interface device.
ARCNET and I/O Expansion
ARCNET and I/O Expansion are available on some PiC94X Turbo CPUs. The specification table at the end of this appendix lists the CPU modules that have this communication capability on board. The 7-pin screw terminal connector is used for ARCNET communications and local or block I/O expansion. The fiber optic connectors are used for remote I/O
A.6 -2
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
expansion. NOTE: You can choose to do only one type of expansion at a time: local or block I/O or remote. The top two pins are used for peer-to-peer (ARCNET) communication connections using twisted pair wire*. The next four pins are used for local [up to a 40 feet (12 m) segment] I/O expansion (up to seven expansion racks) or block I/O expansion using twisted pair wire*. The bottom pin is a shield connection. When using shielded wire, connect the shields to it. *Use shielded cables when it is necessary to meet EMC standards. The recommended wire has 100 characteristic impedance.
Figure A6-3. Pinout for ARCNET, I/O Local Expansion and Block I/O Expansion Port
+ + + -
Peer-to-peer ( 24 or 26 AWG solid twisted pair wire) Local or block I/O expansion out (18 or 20 AWG stranded twisted pair wire) Local or block I/O expansion in (18 or 20 AWG stranded twisted pair wire) Shield
CAUTION The network is polarity dependent. In peer-to-peer communications, always connect the positive (+) of the twisted pair interface of the first PiC to the positive (+) of the twisted pair interface of the second PiC and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc. In I/O expansion systems, connect the positive (+) of the twisted pair out of the CPU module to the positive (+) of the twisted pair in on the next module and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc. Connect the positive (+) of the twisted pair in of the CPU module to the positive (+) of the twisted pair out on the next module and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc.
A.6 -3
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Remote I/O Expansion
For remote I/O expansion [from 4 feet (1.2 m) to 2,000 feet (610 m)/segment], fiber optic cable is connected to the two bottom connectors on the CPU module as shown in Figure A6-4.
Figure A6-4. Location of Fiber Optic Connections for Remote I/O Expansion
CPU
TURBO PIC900TM
In
Out
Fiber Optic Connections
See Appendix N1 Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections for information on connecting PiCs on a network. See Appendix N2 I/O Expansion Connections for more information on local and remote I/O expansion and block I/O expansion.
A.6 -4
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
LEDs
There are seven communication LEDs on this CPU module in addition to the DIAG LED. They are located directly under the DIAG LED as shown in Figure A6-5.
Figure A6-5. Communication LEDs
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
Diagnostic LED I/O expansion LEDs ARCNET LEDs User Port LEDs
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
IN OUT
RS232
Below is a list of the LEDs and what they mean.
DIAG
On Flashing Off
On briefly during startup. Flashes error codes under certain conditions. These codes are listed in Appendix M. Normal operation Communication established with this expansion rack connected in an I/O expansion loop. Communication not established
CONFIG
On Off
I/O expansion rack configured
DATA IN
Dull glow Indicates the line receiving in is active. Off No activity in
I/O expansion line activity in
DATA OUT
Dull glow Indicates the line transmitting out is active. Off No activity out
I/O expansion line activity out
ARCNET TX
ARCNET transmit status ARCNET ACT ARCNET active status
RS232 IN
On Normal network activity Blinking Network reconfiguration Off Not active part of network Flash/On Data being transferred to/from ARCNET interface Off No data transfer On Off On Off Data being received at user port No data being received at user port Data being transmitted from user port No data being transmitted at user port
User Port data IN
RS232 OUT
User Port data OUT
A.6 -5
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Theory of Operation
The CPU module performs the following tasks:
1. 2. 3. 4.
It runs diagnostic tests, checks the battery in the CSM, and performs other routine maintenance tasks. It executes the application program, communicating with the I/O modules. It maintains communication with the workstation through the PiCPro port. This port is dedicated to the communication functions of PiCPro/PiCServoPro. It maintains communication with the user interface device through the User port. Details of this communication depend partly on the type of interface device. Refer to the manual that comes with the device. If ARCNET and I/O expansion communications are on board, it supports peerto-peer, ARCNET and I/O expansion communication capability.
5.
Diagnostics
The CPU runs diagnostic tests on each module in the system rack whenever power is turned on to the PiC94X. The CSM is tested first, then the CPU module, then all the I/O modules in turn. A module's DIAG LED is on while it is being tested, and goes off when its internal circuitry checks out. If a DIAG LED does not go out after the diagnostic tests, a fault has been detected. See the Troubleshooting section of the Hardware chapter.
EPROM for the PiC94X
The PiC94X has a socket for a 1 Mbyte EPROM. The recommended EPROM is:
Atmel AT27C080-20DC
This EPROM has three memory areas:
1. 2. 3. Application RAMDISK System
The software manual gives directions for creating a file in a format suitable for an EPROM programmer. This file may be loaded from a workstation into the EPROM using any of a number of commercially available EPROM Programmers. The application file originates at address zero and, therefore, requires no offset. The file uses the 16-bit word format. With the PiC94X processor, when programming an EPROM with RAMDISK information, it is necessary to locate the RAMDISK information in the EPROM memory as follows:
A.6 -6
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
For the default 256/512 memory configuration, the RAMDISK is located at 80000. For the optional 384/384 memory configuration, the RAMDISK is located at 60000. When a new version of the system software is issued by Giddings & Lewis, it also can be loaded via the EPROM programmer. The CPU will check the time/date stamp of the system in EPROM and compare it with the system in FLASH. If the system in EPROM is newer than the system in FLASH, it will reprogram the FLASH with the new system.
PIC900 Memory Organization
The CPU module contains 1 Megabyte of memory. This memory is divided into four groups. The groups are:
1. 2.
System Memory which is used for executive data, bit memory, and user variables. Specific areas of memory are reserved for each of these functions. RAMDISK which is used to provide extra memory for program data storage. To access the data on the RAMDISK, you use special I/O commands covered in the software manual. May be loaded from an EPROM in which the data has been programmed. Application Memory which is where the application program is stored. May be loaded from an EPROM in which an application has been programmed. System FLASH which contains executive code for the system, diagnostics, etc. May be updated from the PC or loaded from an EPROM in which the system has been programmed.
3. 4.
Figure A6-6 shows the location of the EPROM for the PiC94X.
A.6 -7
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Figure A6-6. Position of the EPROM on the PiC94X
So ck et for FM SD ISK
DIAG LED Configure LED Communication LEDs (Not all components shown)
System FLASH
Socket for EPROM
Communication Port
EPROM
PiCPro Port
User Port
Fiber Optic Connections
A.6 -8
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Procedure for Installing an EPROM into the Socket
1. 2.
Turn off power at the main disconnect switch. If the CPU is installed in the PiC rack, remove it. Lay the CPU module on a static-free surface, cover side up. Ground yourself using a properly grounded wrist strap before you open the module. These are standard precautions before handling any electronic components Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module toward each other and lift off the module cover. CAUTION Do not touch the pins on the EPROM. EPROM circuitry can be easily damaged. Broken or bent pins prevent the EPROM from functioning properly. Use Figure A6-6 to see where the EPROM should be placed. If an EPROM occupies the socket already, use a removal tool to remove it. Use an insertion tool to position the new EPROM over the socket being sure to match the notches. CAUTION Make sure the EPROM is oriented correctly. If it is installed backwards, it may be destroyed when power is turned on to the system. Line up the pins and push it in place.
3.
4. 5.
6.
Replace the module cover. Insert the CPU module in the rack next to the CSM. Turn on power at the main disconnect switch and check the LEDs.
A.6 -9
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Specification Table Characteristics CPU 94X module specifications
Function
Executes the application program. Executes Diagnostics on the system and its modules. Communicates through RS232 port to external devices. Can provide ARCNET and I/O expansion from module Number of servo axes available at six update rates**
CPU Part Number Speed 16 MHz App Mem 512K 512K 512K 512K 512K 512K RAM User .5 Mem Mem 8 ms 4 ms 2 ms 1 ms ms 256K 256K 256K 256K 256K 256K 256K 256K 64K 64K 64K 64K 64K 64K 64K 64K 24/12 24/12 32 32 32 32 32 32 12/6 12/6 24/12 24/12 32 32 32 32 6/3 6/3 12/6 12/6 24/12 24/12 32 32 3/2 3/2 6/3 6/3 12/6 12/6 1 1 3/2 3/2 6/3 6/3 .25 ms 0 0 1 1 3/2 3/2 6/3 6/3
CPUs
Model 941
80486DX2 502-04111-01
Turbo2 80486DX2 502-04111-11* 16 MHz 943 80486DX2 502-04011-01 32 MHz
Turbo2 80486DX2 502-04011-11* 32 MHz 945 80486DX2 502-03994-01 50 MHz
Turbo3 80486DX2 502-03994-11* 50 MHz 947
80486DX4 502-04112-01 100MHz 512K
24/12 12/6 24/12 12/6
Turbo3 80486DX4 502-04112-11* 100MHz 512K
*ARCNET and I/O expansion communications are standard on these modules. ** When two numbers are listed (H/L), the High number is typical when running things like RATIO_GR, RATIOCAM, VEL_STRT, POSITION, DISTANCE move types, etc. The Low number is typical when running time axes, servo tasks, RATIO_RL, M_LINCIR, M_SCRVLC move types, etc. The latter place a heavier burden on CPU time than the former. Consult Giddings & Lewis for assistance if you want to exceed the number of axes in this chart. Flash memory system board (optional) Memory PiCPro Port (to workstation) User Port (to serial interface device) 4 Megabyte FMS Board 502-03882-00 8 Megabyte FMS Board 502-03882-20 1 Megabyte max. RS232 serial port, secured protocol Software selectable baud rate to 115.2K RS232 serial port Supports RTS/CTS hardware handshaking Software selectable baud rate to 19.2K
A.6 -10
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
Logic side power requirements (typical)
Part Number
+5 V
+15 V
-15 V
502-04111-01 502-04011-01 502-03994-01 502-04112-01 502-04111-11* 502-04011-11* 502-03994-11* 502-04112-11*
700 mA 800 mA 900 mA 1200 mA 900 mA 1000 mA 1100 mA 1400 mA
4 mA 4 mA 4 mA 4 mA 4 mA 4 mA 4 mA 4 mA
10 mA 10 mA 10 mA 10 mA 39 mA 39 mA 39 mA 39 mA
All CPUs draw 15 A from the battery during power down. Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked 7C to 55C (45F to 131F) -40C to 85C (-40F to 185F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/31/ EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information. UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
A.6 -11
CPU - Central Processing Unit Module 94X Turbo
NOTES
A.6 -12
A.7 - PiC9011/9012 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31046-00)
(This document is archived and available from Giddings & Lewis by requesting part number 108-31046-00.)
A.7 -1
PiC9011/9012 - CSM/CPU (Document 108-31046-00)
NOTE
A.7 -2
A.8 - PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Introduction
The PiC904X CSM/CPU module occupies the 1/2 slot in the rack. The CSM/CPU converts AC or DC power to regulated DC power. It supplies this power to the modules in the rack through the bus. The PiC904X CSM/CPU controls the system and executes the application program.
Figure A8-1. PiC904X CSM/CPU Module
CSM/CPU
SCAN/BAT/PWR/DIAG IN OUT IN OUT PROG/USER PORTS TX ACT ARCNET CONFIG IN OUT BLOCK I/O
Name of module
LEDs
Run
Key slot
Stop
PiC90TM
GIDDINGS & LEWIS(R)
Programmable industrial Controller
ON
Power switch
OFF
L / LINE1 N / LINE2 E / GRND
Power connector
PiCPro
RS232 port connector (to computer workstation) Communications port for peer-to-peer or block I/O (optional) RS232 port connector (to user serial interface) Door
P-P and User Block I/O Port
A.8 -1
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Connections
The CSM/CPU module receives power through a 3-pin power connector. Figure A8-2 illustrates the connections as listed below.
Module AC Power Source 110VAC AC Power Source 220VAC DC Power Source 24VDC
L / LINE 1
to Hot
Line1 Line2 Single Point Ground
+24V 24V Common Single Point Ground
N / LINE 2 to Common E / GRND to Single Point Ground
Figure A8-2. Power to the System
CSM/CPU Module
ON OFF L / LINE 1 N / LINE 2 E / GRND SPG
Power Source
110V AC 220V AC 24V DC HOT Line 1 +24V DC COMMON Line 2 24V DC COMMON GROUND GROUND GROUND
Serial Ports
The PiCPro Port (9-pin D connector) communicates with the workstation serial port and the User Port (10-pin screw terminal connector) communicates with an optional serial interface device.
Figure A8-3. Pinouts for the Two RS232 Communications Ports
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 User Port - 12 VDC (50 mA max.) + 12 VDC (50 mA max.) + 5 VDC (50 mA max.) DTR = Data terminal ready RTS = Request to send NC = Not Connected CTS = Clear to send GRD = ground Receive data Transmit data
GRD 5 DTR (output) 4 Transmit Data (output) 3 Receive Data (input) 2 + 5 VDC (output) 1 (50 mA max.)
(50 mA max.) 9 (output) - 12 VDC 8 NC = Not Connected 7 (output) RTS 6 (output) + 12 VDC (50 mA max.)
Outputs
Inputs Output
AA27-1390
PiCPro Port
The PiCPro Port allows the PiC904X to communicate with the workstation. This port is used when downloading an application program from the workstation into RAM memory. It may also be used to exchange data between the workstation and the PiC904X system while the PiC904X system is running.
A.8 -2
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
The pinout for the PiCPro Port cable is shown below.
PiCPro Cable Pinout 9-pin female 9-pin female (to PC) (to PiCPro Port)
3 2 5
to to
RD TD
2 3
to GND 5
NOTE: Other pins may be connected in the cable received from Giddings & Lewis, but only pins 2, 3, and 5 are used. The User Port is used to communicate with a touch-screen, a hand-held controller, or other serial interface device.
Peer-to-Peer (ARCNET) and Block I/O Expansion (Optional)
Peer-to-peer and block I/O expansion are optional on the PiC904X. The PiC90s with this communication capability have a communications port with a 10-pin screw terminal connector to the left of the user port. (See Figure 7-1.) The top two pins are used for peer-to-peer communication connections using twisted pair wire*. The next four pins are used for block I/O expansion (up to 77 block modules) where the maximum distance between block modules is 200 feet using shielded twisted pair wire*. The 7th pin is a shield connection. When using shielded wire, connect the shields to it. *Use shielded cables when it is necessary to meet EMC standards. The recommended wire has 100 characteristic impedance.
Figure A8-4. Pinout for ARCNET and Block I/O Expansion Port
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
+ -
Peer-to-peer twisted pair interface Block I/O
Out + Out In + In Shield NC NC NC
Peer-to-Peer(ARCNET)/ Block I/O communications port
A.8 -3
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
CAUTION The network is polarity dependent. In peer-to-peer communications, always connect the positive (+) of the twisted pair interface of the first PiC to the positive (+) of the twisted pair interface of the second PiC and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc. In block I/O expansion systems, connect the positive (+) of the twisted pair out of the CPU module to the positive (+) of the twisted pair in on the next block I/O module and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc. Connect the positive (+) of the twisted pair in of the CPU module to the positive (+) of the twisted pair out on the next block I/O module and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc. See Appendix N1 Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections for information on connecting PiCs on a network. See Appendix N2 I/O Expansion Connections for more information on block I/O expansion.
A.8 -4
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
LEDs
There are 11 LEDs on the PiC904X CSM/CPU as shown in Figure A8-5 below. This section describes these LEDs.
Figure A8-5. LEDs SCAN/BAT/PWR/DIAG IN OUT IN OUT PROG/USER PORTS TX ACT ARCNET CONFIG IN OUT BLOCK I/O
Status LEDs
The CSM/CPU module has four LEDs to indicate status as shown in the top row in Figure A8-5 above. They are described below. NOTE: During normal operation the DIAG and BATT LEDs should be off, and the PWR and SCAN LEDs should be on.
Scan (SCAN)
ON OFF
The processor is executing the application program. Scan is lost and there is an orderly shut down procedure followed.
Battery (BAT) ON
Goes on briefly while the battery is checked at power-on. Battery passed power up test.
OFF
Flashing Replace lithium battery. See replacement procedure that follows. Power (PWR)
ON OFF
Power is on to the system. It indicates that the +5V supply is within tolerance. See the specification sheet. No power to the system
Diagnostic (DIAG)
ON OFF
On briefly during startup diagnostics. If it remains ON, module has failed startup diagnostics. Normal operation These codes are listed in Appendix M.
Flashing Flashes error codes under certain conditions.
A.8 -5
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Communication LEDs
There are seven communication LEDs shown in Figure A8-5: two for RS232 communication, two for ARCNET communication, and three for Block I/O communication. They are described below.
PiCPro Programming Port Data In (IN)
ON OFF
Data being received at programming port No data being received at programming port
PiCPro Programming Port Data Out (OUT)
ON OFF
Data being transmitted from programming port No data being transmitted from programming port
RS232 User Port Data In (IN)
ON OFF
Data being received at user port No data being received at user port
RS232 User Port Data Out (OUT)
ON OFF
Data being transmitted from user port No data being transmitted from user port
ARCNET Transmit Status (TX)
ON OFF Blinking
Normal network activity Not active part of network Network reconfiguration
ARCNET Active Status (ACT)
Flash/ON OFF
Data being transferred to/from ARCNET interface No data transfer
BLOCK I/O Module Configuration (CONFIG)
ON OFF
Communication established with block I/O modules Communication not established with block I/O modules
BLOCK I/O Data In (IN)
ON OFF
Indicates the CPU is receiving data from block I/O modules Indicates the CPU is not receiving data from block I/O modules
BLOCK I/O Data Out (OUT)
ON OFF
A.8 -6
Indicates the CPU is transmitting data to block I/O modules Indicates the CPU is not transmitting data to block I/O modules
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
CSM/CPU Time-of-Day Clock
An internal clock IC maintains the current date and time. If power is off to the system, the battery maintains the clock. The application program and PiCPro can access this clock. Details are given in the Software manual.
Theory of Operation
The CSM/CPU module converts input power into DC power at voltages of +5V, +15 V, and -15 V and supplies them to the logic side of the modules in the rack. External power supplies are used for the field side of the I/O modules. Such supplies are not routed through the CSM/CPU, but they should all have the same power cut-off switch as the PiC9041. CAUTION The on/off rocker switch on the face of the CSM/CPU does not control the I/O power supplies. Always shut off power at the main disconnect switch before you replace a module in the system rack. With the CSM/CPU module, a key is supplied to protect the system from unauthorized start-ups. You can set up the PiC9041 hardware, power up and run the diagnostic tests, and even load a software application program without the system key. However, the application program will not be scanned until you turn the Run/Stop key on the CSM/CPU to the Run position. The CSM/CPU module does the following:
* * * * * * *
*
Performs diagnostic tests. Checks the battery. Performs routine maintenance tasks. Executes the application program. Communicates with the I/O modules. Maintains communication with the workstation through the PiCPro port. Maintains communication with the user interface device through the user port. (Details for this communication depend partly on the type of interface device. Refer to the manual that comes with the device.) Provides peer-to-peer (ARCNET) communication and block I/O expansion capability (optional).
A.8 -7
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Application in Flash
The 904X has a flash chip on board that allows you to load an application program into it. This is standard on the 904X and not the same as the optional Flash Memory System (FMS) that you can add. Having the application in the standard flash chip ensures that you will not lose the application if the battery fails. On power up, the application is transferred from the flash chip to RAM as it is when directly downloaded from PiCPro. To place the application in flash:
1. 2.
Compile the application into a hex file in PiCPro. Use the SENDHEX utility (refer to the PiCPro Utilities Manual) to download the application into flash.
Even though you have placed an application in flash, you can still download and run a differenct application from PiCPro. However, when you cycle power on the PiC, the application in flash will always be placed into RAM. If you want to remove the application from FLASH so that it is not placed into RAM when you cycle power, use the SENDHEX utility to send the CLRFLASH.HEX file to the PiC.
Replacing the Battery on the CSM/CPU
Follow the procedure below to replace a battery.
1.
After power has been applied to the CSM/CPU for at least five minutes, turn off power at the control cabinet main disconnect switch and at the CSM/CPU power switch. Unplug all connectors from the CSM/CPU. Remove the CSM/CPU module from the rack by pressing down the latch at the top and pulling it out. Use a static-free work surface if possible. Ground yourself using a properly grounded wrist strap before you open the case. These are standard precautions before handling any electronics component. Lay the CSM/CPU on the work surface with its label side up. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module case toward each other and lift the side cover off WARNING Do not touch any of the capacitors. Do not touch the pins on any of the ICs; even with precautions against static you may destroy the circuitry. Use Figure A8-6 to locate the battery. Note how it is oriented.
2. 3.
4.
5. A.8 -8
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Figure A8-6. Inside the CSM/CPU Module: Position of Battery
LEDs
Power Supply
Key
BATTERY
+
Battery Clip
6.
Use an insulated screwdriver to pry out one end of the battery clip. Remove the clip. Lift the battery out. Replace it with a 3V, 2/3A lithium battery. (See the specification sheet at the end of this section.) Replace the clip ensuring that it is latched. Close the case and insert the CSM/CPU in the rack. Reconnect all the cables. Turn on power and check the LEDs.
7.
A.8 -9
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Specification Table
Characteristic
CSM/CPU specifications
Functions
Supplies regulated DC power to the hardware modules installed in the rack. Executes the application program. Executes Diagnostics on the system and its modules. Communicates through the RS232 ports to external devices. Peer-to-peer communication with PIC900 family of controls (optional)
Number of servo axes available at six update rates*
Models available
PiC90 Model (for use with AC Power Source) App RAM Mem Mem 256K 256K 256K 256K 128K 128K 128K 128K
Part Number Speed 502-04104-01 502-04104-11 502-04125-01 502-04125-11 16 MHz 16 MHz 32 MHz 32 MHz
User 8 4 2 1 .5 .25 Mem ms ms ms ms ms ms 64K 64K 64K 64K 12 12 12 12 6 6 12 12 4 4 8 8 2 2 4 4 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 1
9041 Standard w/o comm 9041 Standard w comm 9043 Turbo w/o comm 9043 Turbo w comm
PiC90 Model (for use with DC Power Source)
9041 Standard w/o comm 9041 Standard w comm 9043 Turbo w/o comm 9043 Turbo w comm
502-04110-00 502-04110-10 502-04126-00 502-04126-10
16 MHz 16 MHz 32 MHz 32 MHz
256K 256K 256K 256K
128K 128K 128K 128K
64K 64K 64K 64K
12 12 12 12
6 6 12 12
4 4 8 8
2 2 4 4
1 1 2 2
0 0 1 1
*The number of axes listed is typical for RATIO_GR, RATIOCAM, VEL_STRT, POSITION and DISTANCE move types. Applications which use time axes, servo tasks, RATIO_RL, M_LINCIR , or M_SCRVLC moves require more CPU time. Consult Giddings & Lewis for assistance if you want to exceed the number of axes in this chart.
AC power source DC power source Input connector
110-230 VAC, 47-63 Hz, 1A 20 -30V DC, 3 A 3-terminal plug connector, meets all specifications for touch safety in accordance with IEC 529 and DIN VDE 0470 part 1
CSM/CPU 40 W (for AC power source) 30 W (for DC power source)
Power output, total
A.8 -10
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Individual outputs +5V @ + 15 V @ -15 V @ Battery
AC Power Source
DC Power Source
5.0 A 2.0 A .5 A
3A 1A .5A
1.2 Ah 3V, 2/3A lithium battery
CAUTION for Lithium Batteries
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Dispose of used batterries according to the manufacturers instructions. + 5 V supply monitor Low trip point 4.50V min 4.75V max High trip point 5.50V min 5.94V max PWR LED goes off and PiC9041 shuts down 4 Megabyte FMS Board 502-03882-00 8 Megabyte FMS Board 502-03882-20 Used to connect to the work station RS232 serial port, secured protocol Software selectable baud rate (300 to 57600 baud) Used to connect to a serial interface device RS232 serial port Supports RTS/CTS hardware handshaking Baud rates to 19.2 K Allows for communication between PiC90s and/or PIC900s (up to 255) A dedicated network controller supports peer-to-peer communications. Provides a twisted pair wire interface that is transformer isolated. Data is transferred serially at a rate of 2.5 megabits per second. Block I/O expansion (optional) Allows for communication between the PiC90 and block I/O modules (up to 77) The maximum distance between modules is 200 feet using shielded twisted pair wire Time-of-day clock Clock tolerance Access via PiCPro or application program. At 25 C, 1 second per day Over temperature, voltage and aging variation, +2/-12 seconds per day
Flash memory system board (optional) PiCPro port
User port
Peer-to-peer communications (optional)
A.8 -11
PiC904X- CSM/CPU Central Service Module/Central Processing Unit
Logic side power requirements (typical)
450 mA 650 mA 600 mA 800 mA 5 mA 10 mA
@ +5 V @ +5 V @ +5 V @ +5 V @+15 V @ -15V
40 mA @ -15V
502-04104-00, 502-04110-00 502-04104-10, 502-04110-10 502-04125-00, 502-04126-00 502-04125-10, 502-04126-10 all 502-04104-00, 502-04110-00, 502-04125-00, 502-04126-00 502-04104-10, 502-04110-10 502-04125-10, 502-04126-10 (all) From the battery during power down
5 A @ +3 V
Operating temperature range
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F)
Storage temperature range -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) Humidity CE Marked 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/31/EEC, 93/ 68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information. UL and C/UL Listed Physical size File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 2.4" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 61 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
A.8 -12
Appendix B - Communication Modules
B.1 -
I/O Driver Module
Introduction
A PIC900 system may include expansion racks containing I/O modules. The I/O driver module must be installed in each expansion rack. A PIC900 CPU module with a daughter board or a PiC9XX CPU module with communication capability must be installed in the master rack. The I/O driver module must always be in the second slot from the left in each expansion rack. Refer to Appendix N2 for information on I/O expansion connections. The DIAG LED turns on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure B1-1. The I/O DRIVER Module
I/O Driver
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG CONFIG DATA IN DATA OUT
3 I/O driver LEDs
6-pin I/O driver twisted pair connector
In
Out
(located behind IN)
Fiber Optic connectors
B.1 -1
I/O Driver Module
Connections
The pinout for the 6-pin I/O driver connector is shown in Figure B1-2. This connector is used for local I/O expansion using twisted pair wire. The top two connections are for the I/O expansion twisted pair out. The next two are for the I/O expansion twisted pair in. The fifth connection is a shield used with twisted pair wire. The sixth connection is not used. Remote I/O expansion uses fiber optic cable connected to the fiber optic connectors shown in Figure B1-1. NOTE: It is possible to combine local and remote expansion racks in the same system. Use twisted pair wiring to connect racks that are up to 40 feet apart and use fiber optic cable to connect racks that are up to 2000 feet apart. EMC NOTE To ensure EMC compliance, use fiber optic cables only. In some applications using only local expansion racks, it may be possible to comply to EMC standards when using shielded twisted pair wires. Verification would have to be done on a system by system basis.
Figure B1-2. Pinout for the I/O driver twisted pair connector
I/O expansion twisted pair out I/O expansion twisted pair in Shield Not used
+ + -
CAUTION The system is polarity dependent. Always connect the positive (+) output of one module to the positive (+) input of the next and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc. Always connect the positive (+) input of one module to the positive (+) output of the next and the negative (-) to the negative (-), etc.
B.1 -2
I/O Driver Module
LEDs
There are three LEDs on the I/O driver module in addition to the DIAG LED. They are located directly under the DIAG LED as shown in Figure B1-3.
Figure B1-3. I/O Driver LEDs
Diagnostic This rack configured I/O driver LEDs I/O expansion line activity in I/O expansion line activity out
AA823-0791
NOTE: The diagnostic LED on the CPU module flashes certain error codes connected with I/O expansion. These codes are listed in Appendix M.
This rack configured On Off I/O expansion line activity out Communication established with this expansion rack connected in an I/O expansion loop. Communication not established
Dull glow Indicates the line transmitting out is active. Off No activity out
I/O expansion line activity in
Dull glow Indicates the line receiving in is active. Off No activity in
B.1 -3
I/O Driver Module
Specification Table
Characteristics
I/O driver module specifications
Function Part number
Allows additional racks of I/O modules to be connected to a PIC900 master rack 502-03657-03
PiC9XX CPU module with communication capabilities in the master rack Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity EMC Compliant Emissions Noise immunity Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per IEC1000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per IEC 1000-4-3 * Electrical fast transients per IEC 1000-4-4 on incoming power lines Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information. UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
510 mA @ +5V 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
B.1 -4
B.2 -
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
Introduction
The serial communications module provides two or four channels to be used for asynchronous serial communication with external devices such as computers, operator interface devices, etc. For each channel, RS232 electrical interface is provided for data and control lines; RS422/485 electrical interface is provided for data lines. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure B2-1. Serial Communications Module (2, 4 ch)
COMMUNICATIONS
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA890-3391
B.2 -1
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each input and output as shown in Figure B2-2. RS232 or RS422/485 interface is available on all four channels. This table defines the inputs and outputs available for each channel on the module using an RS232 interface.
Label Definition Input/Output
RDx_232 TDx_232 CTSx_232 RTSx_232 DTRx
Receive data Transmit data Clear to send (handshaking) Request to send (handshaking)
Input Output Input Output
Data terminal ready (pullup to 12V) Output
This table defines the inputs and outputs available for each channel on the module using an RS422/485 interface.
Label Definition Input/Output
RDx_DIF+ RDx_DIFTDx_DIF+ TDx_DIF-
Receive data
Input Input
Transmit data
Output Output
B.2 -2
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
Figure B2-2. Screw Terminal Connection Assignments
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTION 1
TD1_232 RTS1_232
CONNECTION
RD1_232
CTS1 _232
3
RD1 _DIF+
RS232 or RS422/485
Channel 1
(Pins 1 to 8)
TD1_DIF+
5
RD1 _DIF-
TD1_DIF-
7
COMMON
DTR_A
9
SHIELD
Available for all channels
(Pins 9 to 11)
CTS2 _232
11
RD2_232
RTS2_232
13
TD2_232
RS232 or RS422/485
TD2_DIF+
15
RD2 _DIF+
Channel 2
(Pins 12 to 19)
TD2_DIF-
17
RD2 _DIF-
CTS3_232
19
RD3_232
RTS3_232
21
TD3_232
RS232 or RS422/485
TD3_DIF+
23
RD3_DIF+
Channel 3
(Pins 20 to 27)
TD3_DIF-
25
RD3_DIF-
DTR_B
27
COMMON
SHIELD
29
RD4_232
Available for all channels
(Pins 28 to 30)
CTS4_232
31
TD4_232
RTS4_232
33
RD4_DIF+
RS232 or RS422/485
Channel 4
(Pins 31 to 38)
TD4_DIF+
35
RD4_DIF-
TD4_DIF-
37
(Future Use)
(Future Use)
39
AA891-3391
B.2 -3
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
Figure B2-3 illustrates how to connect an RS232 device to channel 1. Maximum cable length for RS232 devices is 50 feet.
Figure B2-3. Connections for an RS232 Device (Ch 1)
External RS232 Communication Device
Connections RD1_232 CTS1_232 TD1_232 RTS1_232
Screw Terminals
1
3
5
7 Common 9 DTR_A
AA892-4491
B.2 -4
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
Figure B2-4 illustrates how to connect an RS422/485 device to channel 1. NOTE: RS422 refers to an earlier standard that applied only to single drop connections. RS485 refers to multidrop connections. See Figure B2-5. Since the interface is used for both RS422 and RS485, terminating resistors are required for proper operation.
Figure B2-4. Connections for an RS422/485 Device (Ch 1)
Screw Terminals
100 ohm terminating resistors
1
3
External RS422/485 Communication Device Connections RD1_DIF+ TD1_DIF+ RD1_DIFTD1_DIF-
5
7 9
Note: Shield pins 11 and 30 are connected internally to SPG.
11
30
B.2 -5
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
With RS485, multidrop connections are possible as shown in Figure B2-5. The serial communications module acts as the master, sending control sequences to activate/deactivate external devices such as hand-held terminals, touch control screens, etc. Up to 32 devices can be connected per channel. Maximum cable length is 4000 feet. A terminating resistor (100 ) is installed on each end of the system as shown.
Figure B2-5. Multidrop Connections
Serial Communications Module
Screw Terminals
100 ohm terminating resistors
1
3
RD1_DIF+ TD1_DIF+ RD1_DIFTD1_DIF-
5
7
9
11 Note:
Shield pins 11 and 30 are connected internally to SPG.
30
100 ohm terminating resistors External communication devices-Hand-held pendants (Up to 32 devices can be connected)
B.2 -6
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
Theory of operation
Serial communication is accomplished through the use of one or two DUARTs (Dual Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter). External serial devices are connected to a given channel of a DUART through either an RS232 interface or an RS422/485 interface. There is a dedicated processor with FIFO buffers on the module which services the DUARTs. This saves the main CPU from the time-consuming task of directly polling each DUART. The processor supports data transfers with rates up to 19.2 Kbaud for each channel. At rates above 9600 baud, hardware handshaking should be used. The FIFO buffers provide the main means of data transfer between the main CPU and the DUARTs. Up to 1 K of input data and 1 K of output data may be buffered at a given time for each channel. Communication is handled through PiCPro software.
B.2 -7
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristics
Communications Module Specifications
Function Part number Dedicated processor Ports 1, 2, 3, and 4
Provides 2 or 4 asynchronous serial communication channels to be used with serial interface devices 2 channel- 502-03676-23 4 channel- 502-03676-03 80C186, 8 MHz, 32K x 16 EPROM, 8K x 16 RAM RS232 or RS422/485 electrical interface Supports RTS/CTS hardware handshaking Baud rates to 19.2 Kbps 420 mA 450 mA 5 mA 5 mA @ +5V @ +5V @ +15V @ -15V (2 ch) (4 ch)
Logic side power requirements (typical)
50 mA per terminated RS422/485 channel @ +5V 5 mA per active RS232 channel @ +15V 6 mA per active RS232 channel @ -15V Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
B.2 -8
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
B.2 -9
Serial Communications Module (2, 4 channel)
B.2 -10
B.3 -
DeviceNetTM Module
Introduction
The DeviceNetTM scanner module is an interface between the PiC and a DeviceNet network. The module contains an on-board processor, a DeviceNet compliant interface, and firmware that makes it act as the master to all other nodes on the network. Prior to initial operation, a file is generated with specific configuration software in an external PC. This file must be downloaded via the RS232 configuration port to the DeviceNet module prior to initial operation. Two indicator LEDs (IN/OUT) are connected to this configuration port. Directly above the DeviceNet port are two LEDs that provide operation information; Network Status and DeviceNet Scanner Status. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure B3-1. DeviceNet Module
DeviceNetTM
DIAG IN OUT CNFG PORT
Name of module Diagnostic LED Configuration Port LEDs
Network Status DeviceNet Port Phoenix 5-pin
1 2 3 4 5
DeviceNet Scanner Status
Door
Configuration Port RS232 Port 9-pin D
B.3 -1
DeviceNetTM Module
Connections
DeviceNet connections are illustrated in Figure B3-2. Up to 63 DeviceNet Nodes may be attached to the DeviceNet scanner module.
Figure B3-2. DeviceNet Connections
PiC
CSM CPU DEVIC
PC connected to RS232 port for downloading file generated with Giddings & Lewis configuration software
DeviceNet Node
To DeviceNet Trunk
The DeviceNet Port
The DeviceNet port is on the front of the module near the center as shown in Figure B3-1. The pinout for the DeviceNet port is shown below:
Pin # Signal Name Standard Wire Colors
1 2 3 4 5
DeviceNet Node
VCAN_L Shield (drain) CAN_H V+
DeviceNet Node
To DeviceNet Trunk
black blue bare white red
B.3 -2
DeviceNetTM Module
The Configuration (RS232) Port
There is an RS232 port on the lower front of the module as shown in Figure B3-1. This is used to connect to a PC in order to download a file representing your DeviceNet network.
Pin # Signal Name In/Out
2 3 5
LEDs
Receive Data Transmit Data Ground
In Out In/Out
The two configuration port LEDs and DeviceNet port LEDs are described below.
Port LED Network status Color State Definition
DeviceNet
Green
OFF ON Flashing
Off-line On-line and connected to at least one node On-line and connected to at least one node Unrecoverable Fault (dupicate MAC ID check failed, critical bus fault, etc.) I/O connections in timed-out state or other Recoverable Fault No power or else reset asserted Scanner OK and active Scanner OK but not active Hardware or software error Recoverable configuration error (invalid data downloaded) Configuration (download) mode Data is being passed to the module No data to the module Data is being passed from the module No data from the module
RED
ON
Flashing
Scanner status
Green
OFF ON Flashing
Red
ON Flashing
Orange
Configuration IN
ON Flickering OFF
Red
OUT
Red
Flickering OFF
B.3 -3
DeviceNetTM Module
Theory of operation
The DeviceNet scanner module provides a memory image of the nodes (slaves) connected to a DeviceNet network. It is this memory image that is controlled by your LDO created in PiCPro. The module's on-board processor continually transfers data between this memory image and the actual DeviceNet nodes. Communication between the DeviceNet module and the nodes can be set at 125 Kbaud, 250 Kbaud, or 500 Kbaud. The baud rate, the relationship between the memory image and specific data in each node, and other parameters are established with configuration software run in an external PC. This configuration software generates two files. One file is downloaded to the DeviceNet module through its RS232 serial port. The other file is used by PiCPro to establish the relationship between the memory image and the declared variables in the LDO. To ensure that a given location in the memory image is connected to a variable in the LDO and to the corresponding data in the DeviceNet node, the same tag name or label must be used. For example, when running the configuration software, PROX_SW1 could be used as the name for the boolean bit representing a DeviceNet proximity switch's logic state. The name PROX_SW1 must also be used for the corresponding variable in your LDO.
NOTE The G&L DeviceNet configuration software (G&L Part No. M.1017.4267) is required to configure the DeviceNet scanner (within the DeviceNet module) for the devices on the associated network.
IMPORTANT Additional information about DeviceNet can be obtained from www.odva.org.
B.3 -4
DeviceNetTM Module
Specification Table
Characteristics
DeviceNet Module Specifications
Function Part number DeviceNet Port Configuration Port Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
Interfaces to a DeviceNet network with up to 63 other nodes M. 1016.9720 (old # 502-04157-98) Phoenix style 5-pin male connector RS232 interface 275 mA @ 5 V 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
B.3 -5
DeviceNetTM Module
NOTES
B.3 -6
B.4 -
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
Introduction
The ETHERNET - TCP/IP module provides the PiC with Ethernet access and Internet connectivity. Connections for 10Base T, 10Base 2, and AUI (Attachment Unit Interface) are provided following the IEEE 802.3 specification. The data transfer rate is 10 Mbps. Applications can range from connecting several PiCs, connecting groups of PiCs and PCs, or connecting to a system that includes Internet access. At the end of this document is a partial list of Internet links to useful information about Ethernet and TCP/IP networking. The Remote Programmer Access key (future feature) will allow you to enable/disable PiCPro for Windows running over Ethernet. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running shortly after power is applied.
Figure B4-1. Ethernet - TCP/IP Module
ETHERNET - TCP/IP
Name of module Diagnostic LED Ethernet Port LEDs
DIAG IN OUT GDLNK ETHERNET PREV COL
IN OUT RS232-1 IN OUT RS232-2
RS232 COMM Ports
REMOTE PROGRAMMER ACCESS Enable Disable
Remote Programmer Access Key
(Future)
RS232 COMM Port 1
RS232 COMM Port 2
10Base T RJ-45 8-pin connector
AUI 15-pin D connector Door
10Base 2 BNC connector
B.4 - 1
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
Connections
The PiCPro cable is used to make a connection between the PC and the PiC.
1. 2.
Connect the PC to the RS232 Com 2 Port on the Ethernet - TCP/IP module to download the TCP/IP configuration file. Connect the PC to the PiCPro Port on the CPU to download the application LDO.
Figure B4-2. PiC/PC Connections
PiC
CSM CPU ETHER
PC
2. 1.
PiCPro Port
You may choose one of three connection choices to set up your Ethernet - TCP/IP system.
1. 2.
10Base T (10 Mbps, baseband, over twisted pair cable) AUI (Attachment Unit Interface, over shielded twisted pairs of wires with an overall shield covering these individual shielded wire pairs) NOTE: The 15-pin AUI connector does not have the traditional slide lock clip. Instead, #4-40 screw lock bushings are provided. If you want to use a standard transceiver cable, remove the slide lock posts from the male end of the cable. Plug the cable into the AUI connector and secure with #4-40 screws. A screw retainer kit with captivation clips is available from AMP (part number 2059801). A 20 inch ribbon cable is available from Giddings & Lewis for connecting to microtransceivers. It has the advantage of allowing the access door on the Ethernet - TCP/IP module to close. 10Base 2 (10 Mbps, baseband, over thin coaxial cable)
3.
B.4 - 2
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
The table below summarizes the specifications (IEEE 802.3) for the Ethernet connections available on the Ethernet - TCP/IP module.
Connections 10Base T AUI 10Base 2
Category 3 or 5 (5 rec- 78 shielded twisted- RG-58 thinnet coaxial ommended) pair transceiver UTP (unshielded twisted-pair)
Type of Cable Connection Terminator resistance Topology
Shielded category 5 cable is optional. RJ-45 NA Star bus
DB-15 NA Point to Point
BNC T connector 50 Bus Minimum of 0.5 m (23") between computers, maximum of 185 m (607') 185 m (607') 30
100 m (328') between 50 m transceiver (TCP/IP module) and hub
Distance Maximum cable segment length Computers per segment
100 m (328') NA
50 m (164') NA
B.4 - 3
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
A typical 10Base T connection is shown below.
Figure B4-3. Ethernet - TCP/IP 10Base T Connections
PiC
CSM CPU ETHER
10Base T Twisted Pair
Segment
Hub
Node
Node
Node
Maximum segment length is 100 m (328').
A typical AUI connection is shown below.
Figure B4-4. Ethernet - TCP/IP AUI Connections
PiC
CSM CPU ETHER
AUI Cable
(Transceiver Cable)
Maximum length 50 m (164') Fiber Optic MAU (Transceiver or Microtransceiver) Fiber Optic Cable (To another computer or to an optical hub)
B.4 - 4
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
A typical 10Base 2 connection is shown below.
Figure B4-5. Ethernet - TCP/IP 10Base 2 Connections
PiC
CSM CPU ETHER
10Base 2 Coax Cable
BNC T connector Minimum cable length .5m (23") 50 Termination MAU and connection to Coax Cable
Node
Node
Node
up to 30 taps Node per segment
50 Termination
Maximum segment length 185 m (607')
The Ethernet Ports
There are three ethernet ports on the module as shown in Figure 4-3. One of these ports may be used to make your ethernet connections depending on the type of medium you are using. The 10Base-T port uses a RJ-45 style 8-pin connector using 100 unshielded twisted pair category 3 or 5 (IEEE 802.3 section 14.4). The maximum length of the twisted pair cable segment is 100 m (328 ft.). NOTE: The connector is also suitable for shielded cable and will ground the shield to the chassis. The AUI connection uses a shielded D style 15-pin connector using 78 shielded twisted pair cable (IEEE 802.3 section 7.4.3). The maximum length of the twisted pair cable is 50 m (164 ft.). The 10Base-2 (found on the bottom of the module) uses a BNC style coax connector and 50 coax (IEEE 802.3 section 10.5). The maximum length of the coax cable is 185 m (607 ft.).
B.4 - 5
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
The RS232 COMM Ports
There are two RS232 ports at the top of the module as shown in Figure 4-3. COMM 1 will be used for modem connections (future). COMM 2 is used to download your configuration file to the PiC.
Pin # Signal Name
2 3 5 7 8
LEDs
Receive Data Transmit Data Ground Ready to send Clear to send
RX TX Gnd RTS CTS
There are nine LEDs on the Ethernet - TCP/IP module in addition to the DIAG LED. They are located directly under the DIAG LED as shown below.
Figure B4-6. Ethernet - TCP/IP LEDs DIAG IN OUT GDLNK Diagnostic (yellow) Ethernet receiving data (green) Ethernet transmitting data (green) Ethernet 10Base-T good link (green) Polarity reversed on 10Base-T receiver (yellow) Ethernet collision (yellow) Com 1 receive data (green) Com 1 transmit data (green) Com 2 receive data (green) Com 2 transmit data (green)
PREV COL IN OUT
IN
OUT
B.4 - 6
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
Theory of operation
The Ethernet - TCP/IP module contains a 32-bit processor to handle TCP/IP, PPP (future), and Ethernet protocols. It allows you to use the Ethernet network architecture and the TCP/IP standard set of protocols to communicate and access other modules, computers, or the Internet and its resources. The topology alternatives include linear bus and star bus. The CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection) access method is used to regulate traffic on the main cable segment. The design is based on the IEEE 802.3 specifications. The data rate is 10 Mbps. The diagram below provides an overview.
Figure B4-7. Ethernet - TCP/IP Overview
Application Program TCP
Ethernet - TCP/IP Module Software
Transmission Control UDP Protocol User Datagram Protocol
IP
Internet Protocol
Ethernet - TCP/IP Module Hardware Ethernet Network Interface Ethernet Physical Mediums
(FUTURE) Point to Point Protocol RS232
PPP
Modem
Phone Line 10Base T AUI 10Base 2
B.4 - 7
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
Specification Table Characteristics Ethernet - TCP/IP Module Specifications
Function Part number RS232 Port 1 RS232 Port 2 10Base T AUI 10Base 2 Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity EMC Compliant Emissions Noise immunity
Provides the PiC with Ethernet access and Internet connectivity 502-04137-00 Com Port 1 modem (future) Com Port 2 (for firmware and configuration loading) RJ-45 8-pin connector Maximum twisted pair length is 100 m (328 ft.). 15-pin D connector Maximum twisted pair length is 50 m (164 ft.). BNC connector Maximum coax cable length is 185 m (607 ft.). +5V +15V -15V @ 1250 mA @ 30 mA @ 30 mA maximum maximum
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8KV air discharge) per IEC 1000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per IEC 1000-4-3 * Electrical fast transients per IEC 1000-4-4 on incoming power lines Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information. File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
B.4 - 8
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
Useful Internet Links http://www.3com.com/technology/tech_net/white_papers/ 500698.html#6 http://www.library.ucg.ie/Connected/Course/index.htm http://www.combsnet.com/cable/Basics/types.html http://www.jdltech.com/solutions/Standards_Terms.cfm http://www.jdltech.com/solutions/LAN_terms.cfm http://www.datatech.com/hot/w96_2.htm http://www.standards.ieee.org/catalog/IEEE802.3.html http://www.3com.com/nsc/glossary/main.htm http://www.alliedtelesyn.com/prd_tran.htm#microtrans http://www.lothlorien.net/collections/computer/ethernet_frames.html http://www.lantronix.com/htmfiles/mrktg/catalog/etntba.htm http://www.warehouse.com/datacomm/
B.4 - 9
ETHERNETTM - TCP/IP Module
NOTES
B.4 - 10
B.5 -
Profibus Module
Introduction
The PIC900 Profibus scanner module is an interface between the PiC and a Profibus network. The module contains an on-board processor, a Profibus compliant interface, and firmware that makes it act as the master to all nodes assigned to it on the network. Prior to initial operation, a file is generated with specific configuration information in an external PC. This file must be downloaded via the RS232 configuration port to the Profibus scannerProfibus module prior to initial operation. Two indicator LEDs (IN/OUT) are connected to this configuration port. Directly above the Profibus port are two LEDs that provide operation information; Network Status and Profibus Scanner Status. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure B5-1. Profibus Module
Diagnostic LED
Profibus
DIAG IN OUT CNFG PORT
Configuration Port LEDs
Network Status LED
Profibus Scanner Status LED
Profibus Port 9-pin D-sub Connector Open Door
Configuration Port RS232 Port 9-pin D Connector
B.5 -1
Profibus Module
Connections
Profibus connections are illustrated in Figure B5-2. Up to 31 Profibus nodes, without repeaters, may be attached to the Profibus scanner. Up to 125 other Profibus nodes, using repeaters, may be attached to the Profibus scanner module.
Figure B5-2. Profibus Connections
PiC
CSM CPU DEVIC
PC connected to RS232 port for downloading file generated with Giddings & Lewis Profibus configuration software.
Profibus Node
Profibus Node
The Profibus Port
The Profibus port is on the front of the module near the center as shown in Figure B5-1. The pinout for the Profibus port is shown below:
Pin # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Signal Name Chassis ground reserved data + Tx enable Isolated ground voltage plus reserved data reserved Note: It is strongly recommended that you use Profibus Sub-D connectors wiht switchable (ON/OFF) termination, such as Siemans 6ES7 972-0BA11-0XA0 or 6ES7 972-0BB11-0XA0. Only use Profibus type A cable, such as Belden 3079A or Siemens 6XV1 830-0AH10.
B.5 -2
Profibus Node
To Profibus Segment
To Profibus Segment
Profibus Module
The Configuration (RS232) Port
There is an RS232 port on the lower front of the module as shown in Figure B5-1. This is used to connect to a PC in order to download a file representing your Profibus network.
Pin # Signal Name In/Out
2 3 5
LEDs
Receive Data Transmit Data Ground
In Out In/Out
The two configuration port LEDs and the two Profibus port LEDs are described below.
Port Profibus LED Network status Color State Definition
Green
OFF ON
Off-line On-line and connected to at least one node On-line but bus error present (baud rate or wiring problem) No power or else reset asserted, interface closed Scanner OK and active (interface open) Interface open, at least one slave faulted Configuration (download) mode Data is being passed to the module No data to the module Data is being passed from the module No data from the module
Red
Scanner status
ON OFF ON
Green
Red Orange
Configuration IN
ON ON Flickering OFF
Red
OUT
Red
Flickering OFF
B.5 -3
Profibus Module
Theory of operation
The Profibus scanner module provides a memory image of the nodes (slaves) connected to a Profibus network. It is this memory image that is controlled by your LDO created in PiCPro. The module's on-board processor continually transfers data between this memory image and the actual Profibus nodes. Communication between the Profibus module and the nodes can be set between 9600 baud (1200m max.) and 12M baud (100m max.) The baud rate, the relationship between the memory image and specific data in each node, and other parameters are established with configuration software run in an external PC. This configuration software generates two files. One file is downloaded to the Profibus module through its RS232 serial port. The other file is used by PiCPro to establish the relationship between the memory image and the declared variables in the LDO. To ensure that a given location in the memory image is connected to a variable in the LDO and to the corresponding data in the Profibus node, the same tag name or label must be used. For example, when running the configuration software, PROX_SW1 could be used as the name for the boolean bit representing a Profibus proximity switch's logic state. The name PROX_SW1 must also be used for the corresponding variable in your LDO.
IMPORTANT Additional information about Profibus can be obtained from www.profibus.com.
NOTE The G&L Prorfibus configuration software (G&L Part No. M.1300.7794) is required to configure the Profibus scanner (within the Profibus module) for the devices on the associated network.
B.5 -4
Profibus Module
Specification Table
Characteristics
Profibus Module Specifications
Function Part number Profibus Port Configuration Port Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
Interfaces( acts as DP Master - Class 1), to a Profibus network with up to 125 other nodes, using repeaters M.1300.7050 Phoenix style 5-pin male connector RS232 interface 275 mA @ 5 V 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
B.5 -5
Profibus Module
NOTES
B.5 -6
Appendix C - Discrete I/O Modules
C.1 -
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Introduction
The output 24V DC module sources voltage for individual loads from one or more DC power supplies. Each external supply is nominally 24 volts, but can be between 5 and 32 volts. It is available in the following configurations.
1. 32 point 24V DC output module 2. 16 point 24V DC output module
32 or 16 LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state that drives each output. Another LED labeled FB turns on if the fuse in any active circuit is open or missing. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
32 point Figure C1-1. OUTPUT 24V DC source module 16 point
OUTPUT 24 V DC
Name of module Diagnostic LED "Fuse blown" LED Indicator LEDs
OUTPUT 24 V DC
Name of module Diagnostic LED "Fuse blown" LED Indicator LEDs
FB 1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29
DIAG
FB 1 5 9 13
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
1 3 5 7 9
Screw terminal connector
11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
Door
AA57-3290
AA30-0690
C.1 -3
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each output and for each external power supply connection. The outputs are isolated in four groups of eight or four with two additional terminals per group for the DC HOT and COMMON. (See Figure C1-2.) The external DC supply that powers the output signals should have a wire connected from its 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the single point ground used for the system rack. Its power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. In the power distribution diagrams in Chapter 1, a 24V DC supply was set up according to these guidelines. The DC power supply for each group of eight or four devices may be different if required. In most cases one power supply is daisy-chained to all groups. IMPORTANT Do not connect the DC HOT and COMMON to a group unless you plan to use one or more of its outputs.
C.1 -4
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Figure C1-2. Screw Terminal Connection Assignments
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS
DCCOM1 DCL1 DCOUT1 DCOUT2 DCOUT3 DCOUT4 DCOUT5 DCOUT6 DCOUT7 DCOUT8 DCCOM2 DCL2 DCOUT9 DCOUT10 DCOUT11 DCOUT12 DCOUT13 DCOUT14 DCOUT15 DCOUT16 DCCOM3 DCL3 DCOUT17 DCOUT18
GROUPS
LEDS
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS
DCCOM1
FUNCTION DC COMMON DC HOT DC output 1 DC output 2 DC output 3 DC output 4 DC COMMON DC HOT DC output 6 DC output 5 DC output 7 DC output 8
LED
1
DCL1
1 3 5
3
5 7 9 11 13
#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8
DCOUT1 DCOUT2 DCOUT3 DCOUT4 DCCOM2 DCL2 DCOUT5 DCOUT6 DCOUT7
Group 1
Group 2 Group 3 Group 4
#1 #2 #3 #4
Group 1
7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
#5 #6 #7 #8
Group 2
15 17 19 21 23
#9 # 10 # 11 # 12 # 13 # 14 # 15 # 16
DCOUT8 DCCOM3 DCL3 DCOUT9 DCOUT10 DCOUT11 DCOUT12 DCCOM4 DCL4
DC COMMON DC HOT DC output 9 DC output 10 DC output 11 DC output 12 DC COMMON DC HOT DC output 13 DC output 14 DC output 15 DC output 16 Optional diode protection
AA32-1690
#9 # 10 # 11 # 12
DCOUT19 DCOUT20 DCOUT21 DCOUT22 DCOUT23 DCOUT24 DCCOM4 DCL4 DCOUT25 DCOUT26 DCOUT27 DCOUT28 DCOUT29 DCOUT30 DCOUT31 DCOUT32
25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
# 17 # 18 # 19 # 20 # 21 # 22 # 23 # 24
DCOUT13 DCOUT14 DCOUT15 DCOUT16 DCCOM4A
# 13 # 14 # 15 # 16
Group 3 Group 4
# 25 # 26 # 27 # 28 # 29 # 30 # 31 # 32
AA79-4890
C.1 -5
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Each group has its own fuse. The "fuse blown" LED circuit is active for all groups that have a power supply connected. Connections for one group of outputs are illustrated in Figure C1-3 and C1-4. The common side of each load must be connected to the 0V terminal of the supply. This 0V terminal is connected to the SPG used by the system rack.
Figure C1-3. Connections for One Group of Outputs (32 pt module)
SCREW TERMINALS
LOADS DC Supply V+ 0V HOT
CONNECTIONS
DCCOM1 DCL1 DCOUT1 DCOUT2 DCOUT3 DCOUT4 DCOUT5 DCOUT6 DCOUT7 COMMON DCOUT8
1
3
5
7
9
AA78-4890
Figure C1-4. Connections for one group of outputs (16 pt module)
LOADS DC Supply V+ 0V
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS DCCOM1 1
HOT
DCL1 DCOUT1 DCOUT2 DCOUT3 5 3
COMMON
DCOUT4
AA31-0690
C.1 -6
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Theory of Operation
Each output point is a solid state switch rated at .4 A for the 32 point module and .75A for the 16 point module. It turns on or off according to the logic state sent to it by the CPU. If the CPU sends it a logic 1, the switch closes and the device is powered. If the CPU sends a logic 0, the switch opens and power to the device is cut off. The CPU updates the logic state for each switch every time it scans the program. The logic side of the switch is optically isolated from the field side. An LED gives the logic state of each switch. If you need to know whether voltage is actually present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. Each group has its own protective fuse in series with the source to protect against current overload in case the outputs are shorted to ground. In addition, each output is protected with internal clamping diodes. Without clamping, high voltage transients (kickback) from inductive loads might damage the module.
Protecting from an Inductive Load
Resistive loads can be connected to the module and controlled by the system with no precautions other than making sure they have a connection to the common of the DC power supply. When an output is energized, represented in Figure C1-4a by a closed switch, current passes through the load into the common line. When the output is de-energized, represented in C1-4b by an open switch, current stops. The state of the outputs is controlled by the CPU module. Inductive loads have an electrical "kickback" when current is stopped. This can damage or destroy the output switching device. Each output in the Output 24V DC module has a diode through which reverse current can be safely routed. Figure C1-5 shows how the internal diode works with an inductive load. When the output is turned off the inductive field collapses. This creates a reverse voltage across the load called "kickback" which tries to continue the current. The voltage is in series with the DC power supply. The combined voltage appears across the output switching device in the module. If this were the only path available, voltage across the device would peak at several hundred volts. The internal diode provides another path for current. This limits the peak reverse voltage across the load to less than 1 V. Every switch in the Output 24V DC module has this protection so you can connect an inductive load to any terminal.
C.1 -7
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Figure C1-5. Diagram of Internal Protection for Inductive Loads
DC power supply 0V V+
DCL1
OUTPUT MODULE
DC power supply 0V V+
DCL1
OUTPUT MODULE
DCCOM1
Output switching device INDUCTIVE LOAD
DCCOM1
Output switching device
INDUCTIVE LOAD
-
+
DCOUT1
+
-
DCOUT1
a) Output energized
b) Output de-energized
AA33-0690
External Zener Diode on 16 Point Module
In some cases such as a fast-switching device, the energy from an inductive load may need to be discharged more quickly than the built-in diode allows. The fourth group of outputs on the 16 point module allows you to provide an optional path through an external zener diode. A zener diode gives a higher voltage return path than an ordinary diode does. This fourth group has the anode side of the clamping diodes brought out to allow for this quicker discharge. As shown in Figure C1-6 you can connect a zener diode (rated up to 30 V) externally, between the common of the fourth group of outputs and this extra terminal. That is, connect the cathode side of the zener to terminal 19, the common of the fourth group of outputs, and connect the anode to terminal 25. IMPORTANT You must use either a jumper or a zener diode between terminals #19 and #25 any time the fourth group of outputs is in use with inductive load(s).
C.1 -8
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Figure C1-6. External Zener Diode for Fast-Switching Inductive Loads (Outputs 13 to 16 on the 16 point Module)
LOADS NAMES FOR TERMINALS SCREW TERMINALS
DC Supply V+ 0V HOT
DCCOM4 DCL4 DCOUT13 DCOUT14 DCOUT15
19
21 Zener 23
COMMON
DCOUT16 DCCOM4A 25
AA34-0690
Replacing a fuse
This module has four fuses, one for each group of outputs. Fuses are checked only for groups which have external power applied. If power is applied to a group in which the fuse is blown or missing, the FB LED on the module's upper segment lights up. The fuse is in series with the HOT line to the group, to protect the output switching device and the load. The fuse protects against a short circuit in an output device, but not against a sustained marginal overload current. See the specification table at the end of this section. Follow the procedure below to change a blown fuse.
1. 2.
Turn off the main disconnect switch for the system rack and the external DC power supply to this module. Remove the screw terminal connector. Press down the latch at the top of the OUTPUT 24V DC module and pull it out of the rack. Lay it on a static-free surface, label side up. Ground yourself using an antistatic wrist strap before you open the module. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module toward each other and lift off the module cover.
3.
C.1 -9
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Figure C1-7. Positions of Fuses
DIAG LED "Fuse blown" LED
LEDs for the outputs
Fuse for the second group of outputs
Screw terminal connector
64 pin connector to rack Spare fuse
AA836-1091
4.
Identify the fuse that has blown, and use an insulated screwdriver or fuse puller to remove it. Put a new fuse in its slot. The replacement must be a fast-acting 3A 250 VAC fuse. The following are recommended: Littlefuse 235-003 Bussman GMA-3 or an equivalent. For your convenience, there is an extra fuse in the lower front corner of the module.
5. 6. 7.
Replace the module cover, making sure that the top and bottom tabs are fully engaged. Check the wiring to the devices to find why the fuse blew, and correct the situation before you continue running the program. Slide the module back in its slot, connect the screw terminal connector, and turn power back on. After the diagnostic tests run, the DIAG and the FB LEDs should both be off.
C.1 -10
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Output 24V DC module specifications
Function Part number DC source requirements Field side connector Protection of logic circuits Grouping of outputs
Sources an external DC supply to 16/32 loads 32 point 16 point 502-03640-02 502-03549-02
Nominal 24V DC; range 5 to 32 VDC 32 point 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals 16 point 25-pin card edge connector, screw terminals Optical isolation between the logic and field side Four groups of 8 or 4 solid-state switches. Each group may use its own DC supply, or one supply may be daisy-chained. UL 508 spacing Fast-acting, UL rated 3A 250 VAC metric fuse, 5 x 20 mm 2 A of continuous current for the group; 32-point - each switch is rated at .4 A continuous 16 point - each switch is rated at .75 A continuous An LED for each output A DIAG LED turns OFF when the module passes its diagnostic tests at power-on A logic side LED lights to indicate a "blown fuse" condition when power is on to a group with missing or open fuse Solid-state switches 30 sec max 300 sec max 0.5 mA max 32 point 16 point 1.8 VDC @ .4 A 1.6 VDC @ .75A
Fuse per group of 8 switches Maximum current per group
Indicator lights, output circuits Indicator light, module Indicator light, fuses
Switch characteristics Time delay on for resistive loads Time delay off for resistive loads Leakage current in off state Switch voltage, maximum ON Surge current, maximum
32 point 2.5 A for 40 msec., every 2 seconds 16 point 5 A for 40 msec, every 2 seconds; fuse blows if this is exceeded
All outputs are reset to the OFF state
Response to scan loss
C.1 -11
Output 24V DC Source Module (32 or 16 points)
Logic side power requirements (typical) Field side power dissipation, worst case (at 32 VDC) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
1 mA @ +5V 32 point 25 mA per energized output @ +5V 16 point 23 mA per energized output @ +5V 15.8 W 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch). 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.1 -12
C.2 -
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
Introduction
The input 24V DC module converts DC signals from devices into logic levels that the CPU can use. Each signal is converted into a corresponding logic 1 or 0 which is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module. An "on" signal is nominally 24 VDC, but can be any level between 14 and 30 volts. An "off" signal is any level below 5V. The wiring configurations may be sink or source. The module is available in the following configurations.
1. 2.
32 point 24V DC input module 6 point 24V DC input module
32 or 16 LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state of each input. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostics tests are running.
Figure C2-1. INPUT 24V DC Module 32 point 16 point
INPUT
24 V DC
Name of module Diagnostic LED
INPUT 24 V DC
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
DIAG
1 5
1 5
9 13 17 21 25 29
Indicator LEDs
9 13
Indicator LEDs
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
1 3 5 7 9
Screw terminal connector
11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
Door
AA42-2290
AA37-0690
C.2 -1
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
Connections
A screw terminal connector is provided for each input and for each external power supply connection. The inputs are isolated in four groups of eight or four, with one additional terminal per group for the DC source/sink connection. The devices connected to terminals in the same group have a common DC supply and are wired in the same configuration, sink or source. The external DC supply that powers the input signals should have a wire connected from its 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the single-point ground used for the system rack. Its power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. In the power distribution diagrams in Chapter 1, a 24 VDC supply is set up according to these guidelines.
C.2 -2
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
Figure C2-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments 32 point 16 point
CONNECTIONS
DCIN1 DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN4 DCIN5 DCIN6 DCIN7 DCIN8 DCSS1
SCREW TERMINALS
FUNCTION
LED
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS
FUNCTION
LED
1 3 5 7 9 11
DCIN9 DCIN10 DCIN11 DCIN12 DCIN13 DCIN14 DCIN15 DCIN16 DCSS2
DC input 1 DC input 2
#1 #2 #3
1
DCSS1 DCIN1 DCIN 2 DCIN3 DCIN4
DC sink/source DC input 2 5 7 DC input 3 DC input 4 DC sink/source 9 11 13
Group 1
DC input 3 DC input 4 DC input 5 DC input 6 DC input 7
Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4
3
DC input 1
#1 #2 #3 #4
#4 #5 #6 #7 #8
DC input 8 DC sink/source DC input 9 DC input 10
DCSS2 DCIN5 DCIN6
DC input 5 DC input 6 DC input 7 DC input 8
#5 #6 #7 #8
13 15 17 19 21
Group 2
DC input 11 DC input 12 DC input 13
#9 # 10 # 11 # 12 # 13 # 14 # 15 # 16
DCIN7 DCIN8
DCSS3 DCIN9 DCIN10 DCIN11 DCIN12
DC sink/source 15 17 19 DC input 9 DC input 10 DC input 11 DC input 12 DC sink/source 21 23 25 DC input 13 DC input 14 DC input 15 DC input 16 # 13 # 14 # 15 # 16 #9 # 10 # 11 # 12
DC input 14 DC input 15 DC input 16 DC sink/source
DCIN17 DCIN18 DCIN19 DCIN20 DCIN21 DCIN22 DCIN23 DCIN24 DCSS3
23 25 27 29 31
DC input 17 DC input 18 DC input 19 DC input 20 DC input 21 DC input 22 DC input 23
DC input 24 DC sink/source DC input 25 DC input 26 DC input 27 DC input 28 DC input 29 DC input 30
# 17 # 18 # 19 # 20 # 21 # 22 # 23 # 24
DCSS4 DCIN13 DCIN14 DCIN15 DCIN16
DCIN25 DCIN26 DCIN27 DCIN28 DCIN29 DCIN30 DCIN31 DCIN32 DCSS4
Group 3 Group 4
33 35 37 39
# 25 # 26 # 27 # 28 # 29 # 30 # 31 # 32
DC input 31 DC input 32 DC sink/source
C.2 -3
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
Figure C2-3 and C2-4 illustrates two groups of inputs using the same power supply. Each group can work independently of the others; some groups may be sink and others source. The DC power supply for each group may be different if required. Typically just one DC power supply is used, daisy-chained from one group to the next. The first group of eight inputs is shown with devices "sinking" current through the DC Input module. The HOT terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS1. The second group of eight inputs are shown with devices "sourcing" current through the input module. The COMMON terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS2. In this example the DC power supply is the same for both groups.
Figure C2-3. Connectors for Two Groups of Inputs (32 point module)
SWITCHING DEVICE DC Supply 0V V+
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS 1 3 5
DCIN1 DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN4 DCIN5 DCIN6 DCIN7
SINK
7 9 11 13 15
COMMON HOT HOT
DCIN8 DCSS1 DCIN9 DCIN10 DCIN11 DCIN12 DCIN13 DCIN14 DCIN15 DCIN16
SOURCE
17 19
AA59-3290
COMMON
DCSS2
C.2 -4
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
Figure C2-4. Connectors for Two Groups of Inputs (16 point module)
SWITCHING DEVICES DC Supply V+ 0V
CONNECTIONS
SCREW TERMINALS
1 HOT DCSS1 DCIN1 DCIN2 DCIN3 5 3
SINK
COMMON COMMON HOT
DCIN4 7 DCSS2 DCIN5 DCIN6 DCIN7 DCIN8
AA38-0690
9
SOURCE
11
C.2 -5
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
Theory of Operation
Each input is guaranteed "on" at 14 to 30 VDC and guaranteed "off" at 0 to 5 VDC; polarity doesn't matter. Its on/off state is converted to a corresponding logic 1 or 0. This logic state is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module, where the processor uses it as data in the ladder program. The logic side of the input is optically isolated from the field side. An LED in the upper section of the module indicates the logic state of each input. Each group is represented by a horizontal row of 4 LEDs. If you need to know whether voltage is present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. The shaded blocks in Figure C2-5 show the limits specified by the IEC. The lines show the maximum and minimum V/I of the inputs in this module. The voltage/ current curve in this graph shows that the input module is well within the IEC Type 1 limits.
Figure C2-5. Input Characteristics Compared to IEC Standards
U IN VOLTS UHMAX 30
MIN MAX "ON" REGION
25 UNOM 24
INPUT VOLTAGE
20
(UTMAX )
UHMIN 15
10
TRANSITION REGION
(UTMIN )
ULMAX 5
0
"OFF" REGION
-5 .5 ITMIN 2 IH MIN 4 6 8 10 12 14 15 I IN mAMPS IMAX
AA40-0690
INPUT CURRENT
C.2 -6
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
IMPORTANT Switching devices can sometimes have a leakage current that exceeds the ITmin (current allowed when off) of an input module. In order to use such a device, an impedance (typically, a resistor) needs to be used in parallel with the input. For example, some of the newer proximity switches use two wires instead of three. The third wire was used for a power or ground line. Without the third wire, the switch is easier to install. However, it requires more leakage current in the off state to power its internal circuitry. As a conservative estimate, use the following formula to calculate an external resistance value. It keeps the input voltage at or below 2.4V when the switching device is in the "off" state. 2.4V -------------------------------------------------------------- R Switch Leakage - 0.75mA If the switch leakage specification is 1.7 mA, then: 2.4V ------------------------------- 2.5K 1.7 - 0.75mA Use a resistor less than or equal to 2.5 K . Be sure that the wattage is adequate for the resistor when the switching device is in the "on" state remembering that: V P = ----R
2
C.2 -7
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Input 24V DC module specifications
Function Part number Field side connector
Monitors on/off states from DC voltage inputs 32 point 16 point 502-03605-00 502-03548-00
32 point 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals 16 point 25-pin card edge connector, screw terminals
Input signals (exceed IEC standards) Nominal 24 VDC on, 0 VDC off, conforming to IEC Type 1 inputs per IEC 1131-2 (four groups of eight or four inputs) UH Max (max. allowed voltage) IH Max (max. current @ 30 VDC) UL Min Guaranteed on IH Min (min. current @ UH Min) Guaranteed off IT Min (current allowed when off) Time delay on Time delay off Protection of logic circuits Indicator lights, input circuits Indicator light, module Logic side power requirements (typical) 30 VDC 7.5 mA Polarity independent 14 VDC 2.8 mA 5 VDC .75 mA 1 ms max. 1 ms max. Optical isolation between the logic and field sides, 4000V peak An LED indicates the logic state of each input The DIAG LED goes OFF when the module passes power-on diagnostic tests 32 point 29 mA 7 mA per energized input 16 point 2mA 7mA per energized input 32 point 7.2W 16 point 3.6W 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing @+5V @+5V @+5V @+5V
Field side power dissipation, worst case Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
C.2 -8
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.2 -9
Input 24V DC Module (32 or 16 points)
NOTES
C.2 -10
C.3 -
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Introduction
The 120/240V output module switches voltage for individual loads from one or more AC power sources. Each external AC source is nominally 115 VAC, but can be between 48 and 240 volts. It is available in the following configurations;
1. 2.
32 point 120/240V AC output module 16 point 120/240V AC output module
32 or 16 LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state that drives each output. Another LED labeled FB turns on if the fuse in any active circuit is open or missing. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure C3-1. OUTPUT 120/240 VAC Module
32 POINT
16 POINT
OUTPUT 120 V AC
Name of module Diagnostic LED "Fuse blown" LED Indicator LEDs
OUTPUT 120/240VAC
Name of module Diagnostic LED "Fuse blown" LED Indicator LEDs
FB 1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29
DIAG
FB 1 5 9 13
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
1 3 5 7 9
Screw terminal connector
11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
Door
AA1115-3092
AA46-0690
C.3 -1
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each output, and for each external power source connection. The outputs are isolated in four groups of eight or four, with two additional terminals per group for the AC HOT and COMMON. (See Figure C3-2.) The external AC source for each group of 8 devices may be different if required. In most cases one power source is daisy-chained to each group. The AC source should be connected to the single-point ground used for the system rack. Its power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. See the power distribution diagrams in Chapter 1 for two possible AC external source set-ups.
NOTE Do not connect an AC HOT and COMMON to a group unless you plan to use one or more of its outputs.
C.3 -2
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Figure C3-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments 32 point 16 point
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS
ACL1 ACCOM1 ACOUT1 ACOUT2 ACOUT3 ACOUT4 ACOUT5 ACOUT6 ACOUT7 ACOUT8 ACL2 ACCOM2 ACOUT9 ACOUT10 ACOUT11 ACOUT12 ACOUT13 ACOUT14 ACOUT15 ACOUT16 ACL3 ACCOM3 ACOUT17 ACOUT18 ACOUT19 ACOUT20 ACOUT21 ACOUT22 ACOUT23 ACOUT24 ACL4 ACCOM4 ACOUT25 ACOUT26 ACOUT27 ACOUT28 ACOUT29 ACOUT30 ACOUT31 ACOUT32
LEDS
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS
ACL1
FUNCTION AC HOT
LED
1
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Group 1
ACOUT1 ACOUT2 ACOUT3 ACOUT4 ACL2 ACCOM2 ACOUT5
Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4
3 5 7 9 11
ACCOM1
#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8
AC COMMON AC output 1 AC output 2 AC output 3 AC output 4 AC HOT AC COMMON AC output 5 AC output 6 AC output 7 AC output 8 AC HOT AC COMMON AC output 9 AC output 10 AC output 11 AC output 12 AC HOT AC COMMON AC output 13 AC output 14 AC output 15 AC output 16
#1 #2 #3 #4
#5 #6 #7 #8
ACOUT6
13
Group 2
15 17 19 21 23
#9 # 10 # 11 # 12 # 13 # 14 # 15 # 16
ACOUT7 ACOUT8 ACL3 ACCOM3 ACOUT9 ACOUT10 ACOUT11 ACOUT12 ACL4
#9 # 10 # 11 # 12
25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
# 17 # 18 # 19 # 20 # 21 # 22 # 23 # 24
ACCOM4 ACOUT13 ACOUT14 ACOUT15 ACOUT16
Group 3
# 13 # 14 # 15 # 16
AA48-0690
# 25 # 26 # 27 # 28 # 29 # 30 # 31 # 32
Group 4
AA1112-2492
C.3 -3
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Each group has its own protective fuse. The "fuse blown" LED circuit is active for all groups that have a power source connected. Figure C3-3 and C3-4 illustrates the connections for one group of outputs. The common side of each load must be connected to the COMMON of the AC source.
Figure C3-3. Connectors for One Group of Outputs (32 point module)
AC SUPPLY HOT COMMON SCREW TERMINALS 1
LOADS
CONNECTIONS ACL1 ACCOM1 ACOUT1 ACOUT2 ACOUT3 ACOUT4 ACOUT5 ACOUT6 ACOUT7 ACOUT8
3
5
7
9
Figure C3-4. Connectors for One Group of Outputs (16 point module)
AC SUPPLY
LOADS
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS
HOT COMMON
ACL1 ACCOM1 ACOUT1 ACOUT2 ACOUT3 ACOUT4
1
3
5
AA47-0690
C.3 -4
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Theory of Operation
Each output point is a solid state switch rated at .75A continuous for the 32 point module and 2A continuous for the 16 point module. It turns on or off according to the logic state sent to it by the CPU. If the CPU sends it a logic 1, the switch closes and the load is powered. If the CPU sends a logic 0, the switch opens and power to the load is removed. The CPU updates the logic state for each switch every time it scans the program. The logic side of the switch is optically isolated from the field side. An LED gives the logic state of each output. If you need to know whether voltage is actually on at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. The output switch is turned on near the zero voltage crossing of the AC power source and is turned off at zero current. Each group has its own protective fuse in series with the source to protect against current overload in case the outputs are shorted to ground.
Protecting from an Inductive Load
Arc suppression is not required for a non-inductive load or for an inductive load switched only by the Output 120/240V AC (32 pt) module. If an inductive load is in series with an external switch or contact, an external arc suppresser is required as shown in Figure C3-5 and C3-6. When an inductive load is turned off it can generate a voltage spike which may peak at several thousand volts. Such a spike can cause erratic operation and may damage the module. You must place an arc suppresser across the inductive device to absorb the excess energy.
C.3 -5
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Figure C3-5. Arc Suppression for a Switched Inductive Load (32 pt module)
AC SUPPLY HOT COMMON
LOADS
CONNECTIONS ACL1 ACCOM1 ACOUT1 ACOUT2 ACOUT3 ACOUT4 ACOUT5 9 ACOUT6 ACOUT7 ACOUT8
SCREW TERMINALS 1
3
5
7
(RC bypass)
Figure C3-6. Arc Suppression for a Switched Inductive Load (16 pt module)
AC SUPPLY HOT COMMON
LOADS
SCREW CONNECTIONS TERMINALS ACL1 ACCOM1 ACOUT1 ACOUT2 ACOUT3 ACOUT4 5 3 1
(RC bypass)
AA49-0690
Specifications for the RC bypass:
resistor: 220 1 Watt capacitor: 1.0 F, 600 V
C.3 -6
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Replacing a Fuse
This module has four fuses, one for each group of outputs. Fuses are checked only for groups which have external power applied. If power is applied to a group in which the fuse is blown or missing, the FB LED on the module's upper segment lights up. The fuse is in series with the HOT line to the group, to protect the output switching device and the load. The fuse protects against a short circuit in an output device, but not against a sustained marginal overload current. See the specification table at the end of this section.
1. 2.
Turn off the main disconnect switch for the system rack and the external AC power source to this module. Remove the screw terminal connector bar. Press down the latch at the top of the OUTPUT 120/240V AC (32 pt) module and pull it out of the rack. Lay it on a static-free surface, label side up. Ground yourself using an antistatic wrist strap before you open the module. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module toward each other and lift off the module cover.
Figure C3-7. Position of Fuses
3.
Spare fuse DIAG LED "Fuse blown" LED
LEDs for the outputs
Fuses for each group of outputs
Screw termimal connector
64 pin connector to rack
AA1116-3092
C.3 -7
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
4.
Identify the fuse that has blown, and use an insulted screwdriver or fuse puller to remove it. Put a new fuse in its slot. The replacement fuse must be a fastacting 3A 250 VAC fuse. The following fuses are recommended: Littlefuse 235-003 Bussman GMA-3 or an equivalent. For your convenience, there is an extra fuse in the lower front corner of the module.
5. 6. 7.
Replace the module cover, making sure that the top and bottom tabs are fully engaged. Slide the module back in its slot, and turn power back on. After the diagnostic tests runs, the DIAG and the FB lights should both be off. Check the wiring to the devices to find why the fuse blew, and correct the situation before you continue running the program.
C.3 -8
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Output 120/240V AC module specifications
Function Part number AC source requirements Field side connector Protection of logic circuits Arrangement of outputs
Switches an external AC source to 32 or 16 loads 32 point 16 point 502-03641-02 502-03551-02
Nominal 115 VAC, range 48 to 240 VAC 32 point 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals 16 point 25-pin card edge connector, screw terminals Optical isolation between the logic and field side, 2830 VAC Four groups of 8 or 4 solid-state switches. Each group can use its own AC source, or one source can be daisychained. UL 508 spacing Fast-acting, UL rated 3A 250 VAC metric fuse, 5 x 20 mm 2 A of continuous current for the group; 32 point each switch is rated at .75 A continuous 16 point each switch is rated at 2 A continuous An LED for each output A DIAG LED turns OFF when the module passes its diagnostic tests at power-on. A logic side LED lights to indicate a "blown fuse" condition when power is on to a group with a missing or open fuse. Solid-state switches. 32 point 1V AC @ .75A RMS 16 point 1.2V AC @ 2A RMS 20 A for 2 cycles, every 2 seconds; fuse blows if this is exceeded. 50 / 60 Hz. 5% 1/2 cycle (turns on at zero voltage) 1/2 cycle (turns off at zero voltage) 50 mA 4 mA @ 120 VAC 6 mA @ 240 VAC
Fuse per group of 8 Maximum current per group
Indicator lights, output circuits Indicator light, module Indicator light, fuses
Switch characteristics Switch voltage, maximum ON Surge current, maximum Frequency Time delay on, maximum Time delay off, maximum Minimum load current Leakage current in OFF state, maximum
C.3 -9
Output 120/240V AC Module (32 or 16 point)
Response to scan loss Logic side power requirements (typical)
All outputs are reset to the OFF state 32 point 1 mA 7 mA per energized output 16 point 1 mA 23 mA per energized output 32 point 16 point 11.0W 12.0W @ @ @ @ +5V +5V +5V +5V
Field side power dissipation, worst case Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/31/ EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.3 -10
C.4 -
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
Introduction
The input 120V AC module converts AC signals from 16 devices into logic levels that the CPU can use. Each signal is converted into a corresponding logic 1 or 0 which is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module. An "on" signal is nominally 120 VAC, but can be any level between 79 and 132 volts. An "off" signal is any level below 20 VAC. The wiring configurations may be sink or source. 16 LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state of each input. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure C4-1. INPUT 120V AC Module (16 PT)
INPUT 120V AC
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 5 9 13
Indicator LEDs
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA52-0690
C.4 -1
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
Connections
A screw terminal connector is provided for each input, and for each external power source. The inputs are isolated in four groups of 4, with one additional terminal per group to determine sink or source operation. The devices for each group must be powered from the same AC source. (See Figure C4-2.) Each group can work independently from the others; some groups may be sink and others source. The AC power source for each group may be different if required. Typically just one source is used, daisy-chained from one group to the next. The AC input should be connected to the single point ground used for the system rack. Its power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. See the power distribution diagrams in Chapter 1 for AC power connections.
Figure C4-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
MNEMONIC SCREW TERMINALS 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
AA54-0690
FUNCTION
LED
ACSS1
AC sink/source, group 1 AC input 1 AC input 2 AC input 3 AC input 4 AC sink/source, group 2 AC input 5 AC input 6 AC input 7 AC input 8 AC sink/source, group 3 AC input 9 AC input 10 AC input 11 AC input 12 AC sink/source, group 4 AC input 13 AC input 14 AC input 15 AC input 16
ACIN1 ACIN 2 ACIN3 ACIN4 ACSS2
#1 #2 #3 #4
ACIN5 ACIN6 ACIN7 ACIN8 ACSS3
#5 #6 #7 #8
ACIN9 ACIN10 ACIN11 ACIN12 ACSS4
#9 # 10 # 11 # 12
ACIN13 ACIN14 ACIN15 ACIN16
# 13 # 14 # 15 # 16
C.4 -2
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
Figure C4-3 illustrates two groups of inputs using the same AC source. The first group of four inputs are shown with devices "sinking" current through the AC Input module. The HOT terminal of the power source must be connected to the module at ACSS1. The second group of four inputs are shown with devices "sourcing" current through the AC Input module. The COMMON terminal of the power source must be connected to the module at ACSS2.
Figure C4-3. Connectors for Two Groups of Inputs
SWITCHING DEVICE HOT
NAMES FOR TERMINALS ACSS1
SCREW TERMINALS
1
ACIN1 AC SOURCE ACIN2 ACIN3 COMMON COMMON ACIN4 ACSS2 ACIN5 ACIN6 ACIN7 ACIN8
3 5 7
SINK
HOT
9
SOURCE
11
AA53-0690
C.4 -3
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
Theory of Operation
Each input is guaranteed "on" between 79 and 132 VAC and guaranteed "off" between 0 and 20 VAC. Its on/off state is converted to a corresponding logic 1 or 0. This logic state is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module, where the processor uses it as data in the ladder program. The logic side of the input is optically isolated from the field side. An LED in the upper section of the module indicates the logic state of each input. The four LEDs representing each group are in a horizontal row. If you need to know the voltage at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. Figure C4-4 shows the input characteristics of the module compared to IEC standards. The shaded blocks show the limits specified by the IEC, and the lines show the maximum and minimum V/I of the inputs in this module. This voltage/current curve in this graph shows that the AC input module is well within the IEC Type 1 limits.
Figure C4-4. Input Characteristics Compared to IEC Standards
U IN VOLTS UHMAX 132 125 UNOM 120 MIN MAX
"ON" REGION 100
INPUT VOLTAGE
(UTMAX) 75
UHMIN 79
50
TRANSITION REGION
25 ULMAX 20 (UTMIN ) 0 1 2 4 6 8 10
"OFF" REGION 12 14 15 I IN mAMPS I MAX
AA55-0690
ITMIN IHMIN
INPUT CURRENT
C.4 -4
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
IMPORTANT Switching devices can sometimes have a leakage current that exceeds the ITmin (current allowed when off) of an input module. In order to use such a device, an impedance (typically, a resistor) needs to be used in parallel with the input. For example, some of the newer proximity switches use two wires instead of three. The third wire was used for a power or ground line. Without the third wire, the switch is easier to install. However, it requires more leakage current in the off state to power its internal circuitry. As a conservative estimate, use the following formula to calculate an external resistance value. It keeps the input voltage at or below 12V when the switching device is in the "off" state. 12V ------------------------------------------------------- R Switch Leakage - 1mA If the switch leakage specification 1.7 mA, then: 12V ------------------------ 17.1K 1.7 - 1mA Use a 16 K , 2W or any lower resistance and higher wattage resistor. Be sure that the wattage is adequate for the resistor remembering that: V rms P = ---------R It would be acceptable to use a .15 F (or greater) capacitor rated for 120V AC. The advantage of the capacitor is minimal power dissipation. 1 Xc = -----------2fC
2
C.4 -5
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Input 120V AC (16 pt) Module Specifications
Function Part number Field side connector Input signals
Monitors on/off states from up to 16 AC voltage inputs 502-03550-02 25-pin card edge connector, screw terminals Nominal 120 VAC on, 0 VAC off, conforming to IEC Type 1 inputs per IEC 1131-2 ( four groups of four inputs) 132 VAC 8.7 mA 0V 79 VAC 4.6 mA 20 VAC 1 mA 50/60 Hz 5% 14 ms 20 ms Optical isolation between the logic and field sides, 1780 VAC An LED indicates its logic state of each input The DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests at power-on. 1 mA 11 mA per energized input 18.4 W 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing @ +5V @ +5V
UH Max (max. allowed voltage) IH Max (max. current @ 132 VAC) UL Min Guaranteed on IH Min (min. current @ UH Min) Guaranteed off IT Min (current allowed when off) Frequency Time delay on, max. Time delay off, max. Protection of logic circuits Indicator lights, circuits Indicator light, module Logic side power requirements (typical) Field side power dissipation, worst case Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
C.4 -6
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.4 -7
Input 120V AC Module (16 points)
NOTES
C.4 -8
C.5 -
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Introduction
The output 24V DC module sinks voltage for 32 individual loads from one or more DC power supplies. Each external supply is nominally 24 volts, but can be between 5 and 32 volts. It is available in three configurations. 1. 32 point, all diode protected 2. 32 point, 16 diode protected/16 unprotected 3. 32 point, all unprotected 32 LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state that drives each output. Another LED labeled FB turns on if the fuse in any active circuit is open or missing. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure C5-1. OUTPUT 24V DC Sink Module
OUTPUT 24 V DC
Name of module Diagnostic LED "Fuse blown" LED Indicator LEDs
FB 1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA57-3290
C.5 -1
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each output. The outputs are isolated in four groups of eight with one additional terminal per group (DCOUT) for the DC fused supply (DCIN HOT). (See Figure C5-3.) Two terminals are provided for DC common. There is one common for two groups of eight outputs. Two terminals are provided for the DC supply input. Each DC supply input is split into two separate fused circuits and returned to a terminal for field use (See Figure C5-2.) The "fuse blown" LED circuit is active for all groups that have a power supply connected. The DC power supply for each set of 16 devices may be different if required. In most cases one power supply is daisy-chained to all groups. The external DC supply that powers the output signals should have a wire connected from its 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the single point ground used for the system rack. Its power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. In the power distribution diagrams in the Hardware chapter, a 24V DC supply was set up according to these guidelines. IMPORTANT Do not connect the DC HOT (DCIN) and COMMON (DCCOM) to a group unless you plan to use one or more of its outputs.
C.5 -2
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Figure C5-2. Internal Module Connections for Group 1 and 2 Outputs
OUTPUT MODULE
DCCOM DCIN1 (HOT) 1 2 Blown Fuse Detector
Common for Group 1
DCSINK1 DCSINK2
Group 1 Loads
DCSINK8 11 DCOUT1
12
DCOUT2 DCSINK9
Common for Group 2
DCSINK10
Group 2 Loads
DCSINK16
AA833-1591
C.5 -3
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Figure C5-3. Screw Terminal Connection Assignments
CONNECTIONS
DCCOM1 DCIN1 (line) DCSINK1 DCSINK2 DCSINK3 DCSINK4 DCSINK5 DCSINK6 DCSINK7 DCSINK8 DCOUT1 DCOUT2 DCSINK9 DCSINK10 DCSINK11 DCSINK12 DCSINK13 DCSINK14 DCSINK15 DCSINK16 DCCOM2 DCIN2 (line) DCSINK17 DCSINK18 DCSINK19 DCSINK20 DCSINK21 DCSINK22 DCSINK23 DCSINK24 DCOUT3 DCOUT4 DCSINK25 DCSINK26 DCSINK27 DCSINK28 DCSINK29 DCSINK30 DCSINK31 DCSINK32
SCREW TERMINALS
GROUPS
LEDS
1 3 5 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8
Group 1
7 9 11 13 15
#9 # 10 # 11
Group 2
17 19 21 23 25
# 12 # 13 # 14 # 15 # 16
Group 3
27 29 31 33 35
# 17 # 18 # 19 # 20 # 21 # 22 # 23 # 24
Group 4
37 39
# 25 # 26 # 27 # 28 # 29 # 30 # 31 # 32
AA830-1591
C.5 -4
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Connections for one group of outputs are illustrated in Figure C5-4.
Figure C5-4. Connections for One Group of Outputs
SCREW TERMINALS
CONNECTIONS DC 0V Supply V+ DCCOM1 HOT DCIN1 DCSINK1 DCSINK2 DCSINK3 DCSINK4 LOADS DCSINK5 DCSINK6 DCSINK7 DCSINK8 DCOUT1
1
3
5
7
9
11
AA831-1591
Theory of Operation
Each output point is a solid state switch rated at .4 A. It turns on or off according to the logic state sent to it by the CPU. If the CPU sends it a logic 1, the switch closes and the load is provided a path to common. If the CPU sends a logic 0, the switch opens and power to the load is cut off. The CPU updates the logic state for each switch every time it scans the program. The logic side of the switch is optically isolated from the field side. An LED gives the logic state of each switch. If you need to know whether voltage is actually present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. Each group has its own protective fuse in series with the source to protect against current overload in case the outputs are shorted to ground. In addition on the 32 point, all protected module, the outputs are protected with internal clamping diodes. Without clamping, high voltage transients (kickback) from inductive loads might damage the module. On the 32 point, 16 protected/16 unprotected module, 16 of the outputs are protected with internal clamping diodes. Without clamping, high voltage transients (kickback) from inductive loads might damage the module. The remaining 16 outputs do not have the internal clamping diode protection. These outputs should be used for non-inductive loads such as resistive or electronic loads.
C.5 -5
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
On the 32 point, all unprotected module, the outputs do not have internal clamping diode protection. These outputs should be used for non-inductive loads such as resistive or electronic loads.
Protecting from an Inductive Load
Resistive loads can be connected to the module and controlled by the system with no precautions other than making sure they have a connection to the DCOUT fused supply. When an output is energized, represented in Figure C5-5a by a closed switch, current passes through the load into the common line. When the output is de-energized, represented in C5-5b by an open switch, current stops. The state of the outputs is controlled by the CPU module. Inductive loads have an electrical "kickback" when current is stopped. This can damage or destroy the output switching device. Any diode protected output in the Output 24V DC module has a diode through which reverse current can be safely routed. Figure C5-5 shows how the internal diode works with an inductive load. When the output is turned off the inductive field collapses. This creates a reverse voltage across the load called "kickback" which tries to continue the current. The voltage is in series with the DC power supply. The combined voltage appears across the output switching device in the module. If this were the only path available, voltage across the device would peak at several hundred volts. The internal diode provides another path for current. This limits the peak reverse voltage across the load to less than 1 V. On the 32 point, all protected module, every point has this protection. You can connect an inductive load to any screw terminal. On the 32 point, 16 protected/16 unprotected module, the first 16 switches (DCSINK 1 through DCSINK 16) has this protection so you can connect an inductive load to any of these terminals. The last 16 switches (DCSINK 17 through DCSINK 32) do not have the internal clamping diode protection. These outputs should be used for non-inductive loads such as resistive or electronic loads. On the 32 point, all unprotected module, none of the points has the internal diode protection. These outputs should be used for non-inductive loads such as resistive or electronic loads.
C.5 -6
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Figure C5-4. Diagram of Internal Protection for Inductive Loads
DC power supply V+ 0V
DCCOM1 OUTPUT MODULE
DC power supply V+ 0V
DCCOM1
OUTPUT MODULE
DCIN1
DCIN1
DCOUT1 INDUCTIVE LOAD
Output switching device
DCOUT1 INDUCTIVE LOAD
Output switching device
+
- DCSINK1
-
+ DCSINK1
a) Output energized
b) Output de-energized
AA832-1591
NOTE If inductive loads need to be connected to any unprotected point, an external diode must be connected between the load and DCOUT.
Replacing a Fuse
This module has four fuses, one for each group of outputs. Fuses are checked only for groups which have external power applied. If power is applied to a group in which the fuse is blown or missing, the FB LED on the module's upper segment lights up. The fuse is in series with the HOT line to the group, to protect the output switching device and the load. The fuse protects against a short circuit in an output device, but not against a sustained marginal overload current. See the specification table at the end of this section. Follow the procedure below to change a blown fuse.
1. 2.
Turn off the main disconnect switch for the system rack and the external DC power supply to this module. Remove the screw terminal connector. Press down the latch at the top of the OUTPUT 24V DC module and pull it out of the rack. Lay it on a static-free surface, label side up. Ground yourself using an antistatic wrist strap before you open the module. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module toward each other and lift off the module cover.
3.
C.5 -7
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Figure C5-5. Positions of Fuses
DIAG LED "Fuse blown" LED
LEDs for the outputs
Fuse for the second group of outputs
Screw terminal connector
64 pin connector to rack Spare fuse
AA836-1091
4.
Identify the fuse that has blown, and use an insulated screwdriver or fuse puller to remove it. Put a new fuse in its slot. The replacement must be a fast-acting 3A 250 VAC fuse. The following are recommended: Littlefuse 235-003 Bussman GMA-3 or an equivalent. For your convenience, there is an extra fuse in the lower front corner of the module.
5. 6. 7.
Replace the module cover, making sure that the top and bottom tabs are fully engaged. Check the wiring to the devices to find why the fuse blew, and correct the situation before you continue running the program. Slide the module back in its slot, connect the screw terminal connector, and turn power back on. After the diagnostic tests run, the DIAG and the FB LEDs should both be off.
C.5 -8
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Specification Table Characteristic Output 24V DC module (32 pt sink) specifications
Function Part number
Sinks an external DC source to 32 loads 16 protected/16 unprotected 502-03674-02 All diode protected All unprotected 502-03674-22 502-03674-42
DC source requirements Field side connector Protection of logic circuits Grouping of outputs
Nominal 24V DC; range 5 to 32 VDC 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals Optical isolation between the logic and field side Four groups of 8 solid-state switches. Two groups share a DC supply. Two DC supplies are allowed per module. (One supply may be daisy chained.) UL 508 spacing Fast-acting, UL rated 3A 250 VAC metric fuse, 5 x 20 mm 2 A of continuous current for the group; each switch is rated at .4 A continuous An LED for each output A DIAG LED turns OFF when the module passes its diagnostic tests at power-on A logic side LED lights to indicate a "blown fuse" condition when power is on to a group with missing or open fuse Solid-state switches 30 sec max 300 sec max 0.5 mA max 1.8 VDC @ .4 A 2.5 A for 40 msec., every 2 seconds All outputs are reset to the OFF state. 1 mA 15.8 W @ +5V 25 mA per energized output @ +5V
Fuse per group of 8 switches Maximum current per group Indicator lights, output circuits Indicator light, module Indicator light, fuses
Switch characteristics Time delay on for resistive loads Time delay off for resistive loads Leakage current in off state Switch voltage, maximum ON Surge current, maximum Response to scan loss Logic side power requirements (typical) Field side power dissipation, worst case (at 32 VDC)
C.5 -9
Output 24V DC Sink Module (32 point)
Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch). 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.5 -10
C.6 -
Output Relay Module (8 points)
Introduction
The relay output module can switch eight relay contacts. Four relays are normally open(NO)/normally closed(NC) form C type and four are normally open (NO) form A type. Eight LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state that drives each relay. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure C6-1. OUTPUT Relay Module (8 PT)
OUTPUT RELAY
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Indicator LEDs
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA1064-4491
C.6 -1
Output Relay Module (8 points)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each side of the contact. The form C type has three connections; normally open (NO), normally closed (NC), and the common terminal (CT). Only two of the connections can be wired at any time. The common terminal connection must be wired with either the normally open or the normally closed connection depending on the application. The form A type has two connections; one for each side of the contact.
Figure C6-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
SCREW TERMINALS 1 CT 1 2 3 NOT USED 4 5 CT 2 6 7 NOT USED 8 9 CT 3 10 11 12 NOT USED 13 CT 4 14 15 NOT USED 16 17 18 NO 5 19 NO 6 20 21 NO 7 22 23 NO 8 24 25 NOT NO 8 NO 7 NO 6 NO 5 NC 4 NO 4 NC 3 NO 3 NC 2 NO 2 NC 1
CONNECTION
CONNECTION NO 1
AA1068-4491
C.6 -2
Output Relay Module (8 points)
If the normally open contact of the form C type is required for the application, wire as shown in Figure C6.3.
Figure C6-3. Connections for Form C Normally Open
Relay Module
1
NO 1 CT1 Load
Power Supply AC or DC Common
SPG
AA1069-4491
3
NC (not connected)
If the normally closed contact of the form C type is required for the application, wire as shown in Figure C6-4.
Figure C6-4. Connections for Form C Normally Closed
Relay Module
1
NO 1 (not connected) CT 1
Power Supply AC or DC
Load
3
NC 1
Common
SPG
AA1070-4491
To wire the normally open contact of form A, refer to Figure C6-5.
C.6 -3
Output Relay Module (8 points)
Figure C6-5. Connections for Form A Normally Open
Relay Module
23 24
NO 8 NO 8 Load
Power Supply AC or DC Common
SPG
AA1071-4491
Theory of Operation
A relay is composed of a coil and a set of contacts. When current is passed through the coil, the relay is energized. When no current flows through the coil, the relay is de-energized. The contacts close or open depending on the state of the coil. When the contacts are closed, current can pass through them. When the contacts are open, no current passes. There are three configurations for contacts referred to as form A, B and C as illustrated in Figure C6-6. The relay output module has form A and form C available.
Normally Open Form A Figure C6-6. Relay Forms A, B, and C Normally Closed Normally Open/Normally Closed Form B Form C
Coil
Normally open contact
Coil
Normally closed contact
Coil
Normally open contact Common Normally closed contact
AA1067-4491
AA1065-4491
AA1066-4491
A relay is energized or de-energized according to the logic state sent to it by the CPU. If the CPU sends a logic 1, the relay is energized. If the CPU sends a logic 0, the relay is de-energized. The logic state for each relay is updated every time the CPU scans the program. The names of the two types of contacts - normally open and normally closed reflect the state of the contacts when the coil is de-energized.
C.6 -4
Output Relay Module (8 points)
For example, a normally open contact will not pass current when the coil is deenergized. If the coil is energized, the contacts close and current will pass. The normally closed contact will pass current when the coil is de-energized. If the coil is energized the contacts open and no current will pass. These states are summarized in Table C6-1.
Table C6-1. Summary of NO and NC Relays
Normally Open Energized (LED on) De-energized (LED off)
Normally Closed
contacts closed/current flow contacts open/no current flow
contacts open/no current flow contacts closed/current flow
The LED for each output reflects the state of the coil. The LED is on when the coil is energized and off when the coil is de-energized.
Specification Table
Characteristic
Output relay (8) module specification
Function Part number Field side connector Output channels Relay characteristics Contact types Maximum switching voltage Minimum switching current Maximum switching current (DC) Maximum switching current (AC) Initial contact resistance Turn on time (resistive load) Turn off time (resistive load) Expected life, electrical Expected life, mechanical Breakdown voltage between contacts
Switches eight relay contacts 502-03644-02 25 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 8 Four form C (NO/NC) Four form A (NO) 280 VAC resistive load; 50 VDC resistive load 100 mA 0-24VDC 40VDC @ 3 A 30 VDC @ 1.5 A 50 VDC @ 2.5A @ 1.0A
0-120 VAC @ 3 A280 VAC @ 2.5A 100 m 10 msec maximum 10 msec maximum
105 operations minimum 107 operations minimum 750 Vrms for 1 minute
C.6 -5
Output Relay Module (8 points)
Breakdown voltage between contacts and coil Maximum switching frequency Indicator light, module
1500 Vrms for 1 minute
20 energize/deenergize cycles/min. (to satisfy expected life ratings) DIAG LED turns off after the module passes its diagnostic tests. A logic side LED for each relay turns on when the logic side energizes the relay. Electromechanical relay provides protection between logic and field side 1 mA @ 5V 5 mA @ +15V 39 mA per energized output @ +15V (Pt 1-4) 24 mA per energized output @ +15V (Pt 5-8) 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8KV air discharge) per NEC 1000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per IEC 1000-4-3 * Electrical fast transients per IEC 1000-4-4 on incoming power lines Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information. File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
Isolation Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity EMC Compliant Emissions Noise immunity
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
C.6 -6
C.7 -
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
Introduction
The TTL (Transistor-Transistor Logic) module provides 24 optically isolated input points and 8 optically isolated output points to interface with TTL devices (or other 5 VDC devices such as photoelectric sensors).
The module can also be used as a feedback module to read devices like linear displacement transducers (TEMPOSONICSTM, BALLUFF) or absolute encoders. These devices provide high speed, low voltage, low noise parallel digital signals.
An external +5V DC is required for operation. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure C7-1. TTL (24 inputs/8 outputs)
TTL
Name of module
DIAG
Diagnostic LED
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA1123-3792
C.7 -1
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each input and output point and for the external power supply connection as shown in Figure C7-2. The external power supply that powers the I/O circuitry should have a wire connected from its 0V (common) terminal to the rack's single point ground. The power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the CSM (Central Service Module). In the power distribution diagrams in Chapter 1, a DC supply is shown set up according to these guidelines.
C.7 -2
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
Figure C7-2. Screw Terminal Connection Assignments
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS
TTL input 2
CONNECTIONS
TTL input 1
1
TTL input 3
TTL input 4
3
TTL input 5
TTL input 6
5
TTL input 7
TTL input 8
7
TTL input 9
TTL input 10
9
TTL input 11
TTL input 12
11
TTL input 13
TTL input 14
13
TTL input 15
TTL input 16
15
TTL input 17
TTL input 18
17
TTL input 19
TTL input 20
19
TTL input 21
TTL input 22
21
TTL input 23
TTL input 24
23 25
(Not Used) +5V supply input
(Not Used) COMMON
27 29
(Not Used) TTL output 1
(Not Used)
TTL output 2
31
TTL output 3
TTL output 4
33
TTL output 5
TTL output 6
35
TTL output 7
TTL output 8
37 39
(Not Used)
(Not Used)
AA1124-3792
C.7 -3
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
A typical input is shown in Figure C7-3. A 10K pull-up resistor allows the inputs to be compatible with both totem pole and open collector output devices.
Figure C7-3. Connections for TTL Input 24
TTL Module
10K
TTL Input 24 24 External DC Power Supply +5V 0V SPG +5V Common 28
23
25 26 27
100
Optical Isolation
AA1126-3792
An output connection is shown in Figure C7-4.
Figure C7-4. Connections for TTL Output 1
TTL Module
27 28 30 Optical Isolation 29 31 56 32
+5V Common
External DC Power Supply +5V 0V
SPG TTL Output 1
AA1125-3792
The TTL inputs can also be connected to the digital outputs of a feedback device. These digital outputs must be of the totem pole or open collector variety and must meet the requirements listed in the specification table.
C.7 -4
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
The digital outputs of the feedback device are usually weighted from the least significant bit (LSB) to the most significant bit (MSB). Always connect the LSB to the TTL input 1. Continue to connect the remaining bits in order of significance until all available bits from the feedback device are connected. Figure C7-5 illustrates how a feedback device with 10 bits (29) of parallel data is connected to the TTL module.
Figure C7-5. Connections for Digital Inputs from Feedback Device
CONNECTIONS
TTL Module
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
TTL input 1 TTL input 2 TTL input 3 TTL input 4 TTL input 5 TTL input 6 TTL input 7 TTL input 8 TTL input 9 TTL input 10
20 1 2 2 2 23 4 2 5 2 6 2 7 2 8 2 MSB 9 2
LSB
Feed back Device
AA1127-3792
Some manufacturers of feedback devices provide a data valid signal in addition to the parallel output data. This signal is used to indicate when the parallel data is available for reading. The signal may be defined in one of two ways as shown in Figure C7-6.
Figure C7-6. Valid Data
Data valid (Outputs not changing) (Outputs changing) Data invalid
Data valid (Outputs not changing)
OR
Data invalid Data valid (Outputs not changing) (Outputs changing) Data valid (Outputs not changing)
AA1128-3792
This valid data signal is always connected to TTL input 24. The method of indicating valid data is defined in the servo setup software.
C.7 -5
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
Theory of Operation
The input circuitry of the TTL I/O module converts TTL level signals into logic levels that the CPU can use. A TTL device is at one of two defined voltage levels at any given moment. The voltage level corresponds to one of two defined logic levels: 1 or 0. A logic 1 (also "true" or "on") signal is a voltage level between 2 volts and the power supply voltage (nominally 5 volts). A logic 0 (also "false" or "off") signal is any level below 0.8 volts. These levels are compatible with TTL, LSTTL, ASTTL, and ALSTTL families.
C.7 -6
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
Specification Table Characteristics TTL module specifications
Function Part number Field side connector External power supply Isolation Input characteristics
Monitors on/off states of 24 TTL inputs and controls on/off state of 8 TTL outputs. 502-03810-03 40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals +5 V 5% 450 mA 2500 VRMS between field side and logic side Vin high2.0 V minimum Vin low 0.8 V maximum Iin high 1A maximum Iin low - -0.65 mA maximum Minimum input pulse width1 sec Vol -0.8 V maximum @ Io = 10 mA (sinking) Voh -4.0 V minimum @ Io = -10 mA (sourcing) Output turn on/off time - 300 nano sec Maximum cable length - 3 meters (approximately 10 feet)
Output characteristics
Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
+5V @ 450 mA 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
C.7 -7
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.7 -8
C.8 -
Input 12V DC Module (32 points)
Introduction
The input 12V DC module converts DC signals from 32 devices into logic levels that the CPU can use. Each signal is converted into a corresponding logic 1 or 0 which is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module. An "on" signal is nominally 12 VDC, but can be any level between 10 and 14 volts. An "off" signal is any level below 5V. The wiring configurations may be sink or source. 32 LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state of each input. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostics tests are running.
Figure C8-1. INPUT 12V DC Module (32 PT)
INPUT
12 V DC
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29
Indicator LEDs
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA1111-2392
C.8 -1
Input 12V DC Module (32 points)
Connections
A screw terminal connector is provided for each output and for each external power supply connection. The inputs are isolated in four groups of eight, with one additional terminal per group for the DC source/sink connection. The devices connected to terminals in the same group have a common DC supply and are wired in the same configuration, sink or source. The external 12 VDC supply that powers the input signals should have a wire connected from its 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the single-point ground used for the system rack. Its power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. In the power distribution diagrams in the Hardware chapter, a 24 VDC supply is set up according to these guidelines. Set up the 12 VDC supply in the same manner.
C.8 -2
Input 12V DC Module (32 points)
Figure C8-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
MNEMONIC
DCIN1 DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN4 DCIN5 DCIN6 DCIN7 DCIN8 DCSS1
SCREW TERMINALS 1 3 5 7 9 11
FUNCTION DC input 1 DC input 2 DC input 3 DC input 4 DC input 5 DC input 6 DC input 7
LED #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8
DC input 8 DC sink/source, group 1 DC input 9 DC input 10 DC input 11 DC input 12 DC input 13
DCIN9 DCIN10 DCIN11 DCIN12 DCIN13 DCIN14 DCIN15 DCIN16 DCSS2
13 15 17 19 21
#9 # 10 # 11 # 12 # 13 # 14 # 15
DC input 14 DC input 15 DC input 16 # 16 DC sink/source, group 2
DCIN17 DCIN18 DCIN19 DCIN20 DCIN21 DCIN22 DCIN23 DCIN24 DCSS3
23 25 27 29 31
DC input 17 DC input 18 DC input 19 DC input 20 DC input 21 DC input 22 DC input 23 DC input 24 DC sink/source, group 3 DC input 25 DC input 26 DC input 27 DC input 28 DC input 29 DC input 30
# 17 # 18 # 19 # 20 # 21 # 22 # 23 # 24
DCIN25 DCIN26 DCIN27 DCIN28 DCIN29 DCIN30 DCIN31 DCIN32 DCSS4
33 35 37 39
# 25 # 26 # 27 # 28 # 29
# 30 # 31 DC input 31 # 32 DC input 32 DC sink/source, group 4
AA44-3290
C.8 -3
Input 12V DC Module (32 points)
Figure C8-3 illustrates two groups of inputs using the same power supply. Each group can work independently of the others; some groups may be sink and others source. The DC power supply for each group may be different if required. Typically just one DC power supply is used, daisy-chained from one group to the next. The first group of eight inputs is shown with devices "sinking" current through the DC Input module. The HOT terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS1. The second group of eight inputs are shown with devices "sourcing" current through the input module. The COMMON terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS2. In this example the DC power supply is the same for both groups.
Figure C8-3. Connectors for Two Groups of Inputs
SWITCHING DEVICE DC Supply 0V V+
NAMES FOR TERMINALS
SCREW TERMINALS 1 3 5
DCIN1 DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN4 DCIN5 DCIN6 DCIN7
SINK
7 9 11 13 15
COMMON HOT HOT
DCIN8 DCSS1 DCIN9 DCIN10 DCIN11 DCIN12 DCIN13 DCIN14 DCIN15 DCIN16
SOURCE
17 19
AA59-3290
COMMON
DCSS2
C.8 -4
Input 12V DC Module (32 points)
Theory of Operation
Each input is guaranteed "on" at 10 to 14 VDC and guaranteed "off" at 0 to 5 VDC; polarity doesn't matter. Its on/off state is converted to a corresponding logic 1 or 0. This logic state is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module, where the processor uses it as data in the ladder program. The logic side of the input is optically isolated from the field side. An LED in the upper section of the module indicates the logic state of each input. Each group is represented by a horizontal row of 4 LEDs. If you need to know whether voltage is present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws.
Specification Table
Characteristic
Input 12V DC (32 pt) module specifications
Function Part number Field side connector Input signals
Maximum allowed voltage Maximum current @ 14 VDC Guaranteed on Minimum current @ 10 VDC Guaranteed off Current allowed when off Time delay on Time delay off
Monitors on/off states from up to 32 DC voltage inputs 502-03643-00 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals Nominal 12 VDC on, 0 VDC off conforming to IEC 1131-2 (four groups of eight inputs)
14 VDC 8.5 mA 10 VDC 5 mA 5 VDC 2 mA 1 ms max. 1 ms max.
Protection of logic circuits Indicator lights, input circuits Indicator light, module
Optical isolation between the logic and field sides, 4000 V peak An LED indicates the logic state of each input The DIAG LED goes OFF when the module passes power-on diagnostic tests
Logic side power requirements (typi- 29 mA @ +5V cal) 7 mA per energized input @ +5V Field side power dissipation, worst case 3.8 W
C.8 -5
Input 12V DC Module (32 points)
Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.8 -6
C.9 -
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Introduction
The input section of the 24V DC I/O module converts DC signals from 16 devices into logic levels that the CPU can use. Each signal is converted into a corresponding logic 1 or 0 which is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU. An "on" signal is nominally 24 VDC, but can be any level between 14 and 30 volts. An "off" signal is any level below 5V. The wiring configurations may be sink or source. 16 LEDs indicate the logic state of each input. The output section of the module sinks voltage for eight individual loads from one DC power supply. The external supply is nominally 24 volts, but can be between 5 and 32 volts. Eight LEDs on the module indicate the logic state that drives each output. Another LED labeled FB turns on if the fuse in the active circuit is open or missing. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostics tests are running.
Figure C9-1. 24V DC Input/Output Module (16/8 sink pt)
IN/OUT 24 V DC
DIAG
Name of module Diagnostic LED
INPUT 1 5 9 13 OUTPUT FB 1 5
Input LEDs Fuse Blown LED Output LEDs
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AG10-0493
C.9 -1
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Connections
Inputs
A screw terminal connector is provided for each input and for each external power supply connection. The inputs are isolated in two groups of eight, with one additional terminal per group for the DC source/sink connection. The devices connected to terminals in the same group have a common DC supply and are wired in the same configuration, sink or source.
Outputs
A screw terminal connection is provided for each output. The outputs are isolated in one group of eight with one additional terminal (DCOUT) for the DC fused supply (DCL HOT). See Figure C9-3. One terminal is provided for DC common and one terminal is provided for the DC supply input. The DC supply input is a fused circuit and returns to a terminal for field use. The "fuse blown" LED circuit is active when a power supply is connected. Figure C9-2 shows the internal fuse circuitry.
Figure C9-2. Internal Module Connections for Outputs
Output section of module
DCCOMMON DCL (HOT) 27 28 Blown Fuse Detector
DCSINK1 Common DCSINK2
Loads
DCSINK8 39 DCOUT
AG12-0493
C.9 -2
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
IMPORTANT Do not connect the DC HOT (DCL) and COMMON (DCCOMMON) to the group unless you plan to use one or more of its outputs. The external DC supplies that power the input and output signals should have a wire connected from their 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the single-point ground used for the system rack. Their power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. In the power distribution diagrams in the Hardware chapter, a 24 VDC supply is set up according to these guidelines. Figure C9.3 shows all the screw terminal connections.
C.9 -3
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Figure C9-3. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS 1 (Not Used) DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN5 3 DCIN4 5 DCIN6 DCIN7 DCSS1 DCIN9 DCIN11 DCIN13 DCIN15 DCSS2 7 DCIN8 9 11 13 DCIN12 15 DCIN14 17 DCIN16 19 21 (Not Used) 23 (Not Used) 25 (Not Used) 27 DCL Sink Out 1 Sink Out 2 29 Sink Out 3 Sink Out 4 31 33 (Not Used) Sink Out 5 Sink Out 6 Sink Out 8 35 Sink Out 7 37 DCOUT (Not Used) 39
AG01-0393
DCIN1
(Not Used) DCIN10
(Not Used)
(Not Used) (Not Used) COMMON
(Not Used)
C.9 -4
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Figure C9-4 illustrates two groups of inputs using the same power supply. Each group can work independently of the other; one group may be sink and the other source. The DC power supply for each group may be different if required. Typically just one DC power supply is used, daisy-chained from one group to the next. The first group of eight inputs is shown with devices "sinking" current through the module. The HOT (V+) terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS1. The second group of eight inputs are shown with devices "sourcing" current through the module. The COMMON (0V) terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS2. In this example the DC power supply is the same for both groups.
Figure C9-4. Connectors for Two Groups of Inputs
SWITCHING DEVICE DC Supply 0V V+ NAMES FOR TERMINALS SCREW TERMINALS 1 3 5
DCIN1 DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN4 DCIN5 DCIN6 DCIN7
SINK
7 9 11 13 15
COMMON HOT HOT
DCIN8 DCSS1 DCIN9 DCIN10 DCIN11 DCIN12 DCIN13 DCIN14 DCIN15 DCIN16
SOURCE
17 19
AA59-3290
COMMON
DCSS2
Connections for one group of outputs are illustrated in Figure C9-5.
C.9 -5
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Figure C9-5. Connections for One Group of Outputs
CONNECTIONS DC 0V Supply V+ DCCOMMON HOT DCL DCSINK1 DCSINK2 DCSINK3 DCSINK4
SCREW TERMINALS
27 28
29
30 32
31
LOADS
DCSINK5 DCSINK6 DCSINK7 DCSINK8 DCOUT1
35 36
37
38
39
Theory of Operation
Inputs
Each input is guaranteed "on" at 14 to 30 VDC and guaranteed "off" at 0 to 5 VDC. This is polarity independent. Its on/off state is converted to a corresponding logic 1 or 0. This logic state is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module where the processor uses it as data in the ladder program. The logic side of the input is optically isolated from the field side. An LED on the module indicates the logic state of each input. Each group is represented by a horizontal row of four LEDs. If you need to know whether voltage is present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. The shaded blocks in Figure C9-6 show the limits specified by the IEC. The lines show the maximum and minimum V/I of the inputs in this module. The voltage/ current curve in this graph shows that the input module is well within the IEC Type 1 limits.
C.9 -6
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Figure C9-6. Input Characteristics Compared to IEC Standards
U IN VOLTS UHMAX 30
MIN MAX "ON" REGION
25 UNOM 24
INPUT VOLTAGE
20
(UTMAX )
UHMIN 15
10
TRANSITION REGION
(UTMIN )
ULMAX 5
0
"OFF" REGION
-5 .5 ITMIN 2 IH MIN 4 6 8 10 12 14 15 I IN mAMPS IMAX
AA40-0690
INPUT CURRENT
C.9 -7
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
IMPORTANT Switching devices can sometimes have a leakage current that exceeds the ITmin (current allowed when off) of an input module. In order to use such a device, an impedance (typically, a resistor) needs to be used in parallel with the input. For example, some of the newer proximity switches use two wires instead of three. The third wire was used for a power or ground line. Without the third wire, the switch is easier to install. However, it requires more leakage current in the off state to power its internal circuitry. As a conservative estimate, use the following formula to calculate an external resistance value. It keeps the input voltage at or below 2.4V when the switching device is in the "off" state. 2.4V -------------------------------------------------------------- R Switch Leakage - 0.75mA If the switch leakage specification is 1.7 mA, then: 2.4V ------------------------------- 2.5K 1.7 - 0.75mA Use a resistor less than or equal to 2.5 K . Be sure that the wattage is adequate for the resistor when the switching device is in the "on" state remembering that: V P = ----R
2
Outputs
Each output point is a solid state switch rated at .4 A. It turns on or off according to the logic state sent to it by the CPU. If the CPU sends it a logic 1, the switch closes and the load is provided a path to common. If the CPU sends a logic 0, the switch opens and power to the load is cut off. The CPU updates the logic state for each switch every time it scans the program. The logic side of the switch is optically isolated from the field side. An LED gives the logic state of each switch. If you need to know whether voltage is actually present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. A fuse in series with the source protects against current overload in case the outputs are shorted to ground.
C.9 -8
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Protecting from an Inductive Load
The outputs should be used for non-inductive loads such as resistive or electronic loads. Resistive loads can be connected to the module and controlled by the system with no precautions other than making sure they have a connection to the DCOUT fused supply. When an output is energized, current passes through the load into the common line. When the output is de-energized, current stops. The state of the outputs is controlled by the CPU module. Inductive loads have an electrical "kickback" when current is stopped. This can damage or destroy the output switching device. When the output is turned off, the inductive field collapses. This creates a reverse voltage across the load called "kickback" which tries to continue the current. The voltage is in series with the DC power supply. The combined voltage appears across the output switching device in the module. If this were the only path available, voltage across the device would peak at several hundred volts.
IMPORTANT If inductive loads need to be connected to the outputs, an external diode must be connected between the load and DCOUT as shown in Figure C9-7 below.
Figure C9-7. Connecting an External Diode
DC power supply V+ 0V
DCCOMMON IN/OUT MODULE
DCL
DCOUT INDUCTIVE LOAD
Output switching device
-
+
SINK OUT 1 AG13-0493
C.9 -9
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Replacing a Fuse
This module has one fuse for the outputs. The fuse is checked only when external power is applied. If power is applied and the fuse is blown or missing, the FB LED on the module lights up. The fuse is in series with the HOT line to the group to protect the output switching device and the load. The fuse protects against a short circuit in an output device, but not against a sustained marginal overload current. See the specification table. Follow the procedure below to change a blown fuse.
1. 2.
Turn off the main disconnect switch for the system rack and the external DC power supply to this module. Remove the screw terminal connector. Press down the latch at the top of the module and pull it out of the rack. Lay it on a static-free surface, label side up. Ground yourself using an antistatic wrist strap before you open the module. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module toward each other and lift off the module cover.
Figure C9-8. Positions of Fuses
3.
DIAG LED LEDs for the inputs "Fuse blown" LED LEDs for the outputs
Fuse for the outputs
Screw terminal connector
64 pin connector to rack Spare fuse
AA836-0493
C.9 -10
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
4.
Use an insulated screwdriver or fuse puller to remove the fuse. Put a new fuse in the slot. The replacement must be a fast-acting 3A 250 VAC fuse. The following are recommended: Littlefuse 235-003 Bussman GMA-3 or an equivalent. For your convenience, there is an extra fuse in the lower front corner of the module.
5. 6. 7.
Replace the module cover, making sure that the top and bottom tabs are fully engaged. Check the wiring to the devices to find why the fuse blew, and correct the situation before you continue running the program. Slide the module back in its slot, connect the screw terminal connector, and turn power back on. After the diagnostic tests run, the DIAG and FB LEDs should both be off.
C.9 -11
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Specification Table Characteristic Module specifications
Function
Monitors on/off states from up to 16 DC voltage inputs Sinks an external DC source to eight loads 502-03843-02 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals 30 mA @ 7 mA per energized input @ 25 mA per energized output @ 3.6 W for inputs 4.0 W for outputs 5V +5V +5V
Part number Field side connector Logic side power requirements (typical) Field side power dissipation (worst case at 32V DC)
Indicator lights, input/output circuits An LED for each input/output Indicator light, module Indicator light, fuses A DIAG LED turns OFF when the module passes its diagnostic tests at power-on A logic side LED lights to indicate a "blown fuse" condition when power is on to the eight outputs when a fuse is missing or open 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/31/ EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information. UL and C/UL Listed
C.9 -12
Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
CE Marked
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Physical size Input section(16 pt)
1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch). 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
Input signals
Nominal 24 VDC on, 0 VDC off, conforming to IEC Type 1 inputs per IEC 1131-2 (two groups of eight inputs) 30 VDC 7.5 mA Polarity independent 14 VDC 2.8 mA 5 VDC .75 mA 1 ms max. 1 ms max. Optical isolation between the logic and field sides 4000 V peak
UH Max (max. allowed voltage) IH Max (max. current @ 30 VDC) UL Min Guaranteed on IH Min (min. current @ UH Min) Guaranteed off IT Min (current allowed when off) Time delay on Time delay off Protection of logic circuits Output section (8 pt sink) DC source requirements Protection of logic circuits Grouping of outputs Fuse per group of 8 switches Maximum current per group Switch characteristics Time delay on for resistive loads Time delay off for resistive loads Leakage current in off state Switch voltage, maximum ON Surge current, maximum Response to scan loss (present)
Nominal 24V DC; range 5 to 32 VDC Optical isolation between the logic and field side One group of 8 solid-state switches. UL 508 spacing Fast-acting, UL rated 3A 250 VAC metric fuse, 5 x 20 mm 2 A of continuous current for the group; each switch is rated at .4 A continuous Solid-state switches 30 sec max 300 sec max 0.5 mA max 1.8 VDC @ .4 A 2.5 A for 40 msec., every 2 seconds All outputs are reset to the OFF state
C.9 -13
24V DC Input/Output Sink Module (16/8 points)
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.9 -14
C.10 -
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Introduction
The input section of the 24V DC I/O module converts DC signals from 16 devices into logic levels that the CPU can use. Each signal is converted into a corresponding logic 1 or 0 which is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU. An "on" signal is nominally 24 VDC, but can be any level between 14 and 30 volts. An "off" signal is any level below 5V. The wiring configurations may be sink or source. 16 LEDs on the module indicate the logic state of each input. The output section of the module sources voltage for eight individual loads from one or two DC power supplies. Each external supply is nominally 24 volts, but can be between 5 and 32 volts. Eight LEDs indicate the logic state that drives each output. Another LED labeled FB turns on if the fuse in any active circuit is open or missing. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostics tests are running.
Figure C10-1. 24V DC input/output module (16/8 source PT)
IN/OUT 24 V DC
DIAG
Name of module Diagnostic LED
INPUT 1 5 9 13 OUTPUT FB 1 5
Input LEDs Fuse Blown LED Output LEDs
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AG10-0493
C.10 -1
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Connections
Inputs
A screw terminal connector is provided for each output and for each external power supply connection. The inputs are isolated in two groups of eight, with one additional terminal per group for the DC source/sink connection. The devices connected to terminals in the same group have a common DC supply and are wired in the same configuration, sink or source.
Outputs
A screw terminal connection is provided for each output and for each external power supply connection. The outputs are isolated in two groups of four with two additional terminals per group for the DC HOT (DCL) and COMMON (DC COMMON). See Figure C10-4. Two terminals are provided for DC common. There is one common for each group of four outputs. Two terminals are provided for the DC supply input. The "fuse blown" LED circuit is active for any group that has a power supply connected. The DC power supply for each group of four devices may be different if required. In most cases one power supply is daisy-chained to both groups.
IMPORTANT Do not connect the DC HOT (DCL) and COMMON (DCCOMMON) to a group unless you plan to use one or more of its outputs. The external DC supplies that power the input and output signals should have a wire connected from their 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the single-point ground used for the system rack. Their power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the system rack. In the power distribution diagrams in the Hardware chapter, a 24 VDC supply is set up according to these guidelines.
C.10 -2
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Figure C10-2 shows the screw terminal connections for the module.
Figure C10-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS 1 (Not Used) DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN5 DCIN7 3 DCIN4 5 DCIN6 7 DCIN8 DCSS1 DCIN9 DCIN11 DCIN13 DCIN15 DCSS2 9 11 13 DCIN12 15 DCIN14 17 DCIN16 19 21 (Not Used) 23 (Not Used) 25 (Not Used) DCL 1 Source Out 2 Source Out 4 DCL 2 Source Out 6 Source Out 8 27 Source Out 1 29 Source Out 3 31 DC COMMON 2 33 Source Out 5 35 Source Out 7 37 39 (Not Used) (Not Used) DC COMMON 1 (Not Used) (Not Used) (Not Used) DCIN10
DCIN1
(Not Used)
AG02-0393
C.10 -3
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Figure C10-3 illustrates two groups of inputs using the same power supply. Each group can work independently of the other; one group may be sink and the other source. The DC power supply for each group may be different if required. Typically just one DC power supply is used, daisy-chained from one group to the next. The first group of eight inputs is shown with devices "sinking" current through the module. The HOT (V+) terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS1. The second group of eight inputs are shown with devices "sourcing" current through the input module. The COMMON (0V) terminal of the power supply must be connected to the module at DCSS2. In this example the DC power supply is the same for both group.
Figure C10-3. Connectors for Two Groups of Inputs
SWITCHING DEVICE DC Supply 0V V+ NAMES FOR TERMINALS SCREW TERMINALS 1 3 5
DCIN1 DCIN2 DCIN3 DCIN4 DCIN5 DCIN6 DCIN7
SINK
7 9 11 13 15
COMMON HOT HOT
DCIN8 DCSS1 DCIN9 DCIN10 DCIN11 DCIN12 DCIN13 DCIN14 DCIN15 DCIN16
SOURCE
17 19
AA59-3290
COMMON
DCSS2
C.10 -4
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Connections for one group of outputs are illustrated in Figure C10-4.
Figure C10-4. Connections for One Group of Outputs
LOADS DC Supply V+ 0V DCCOMMON HOT DCL Source Out 1 Source Out 2 Source Out 3 COMMON Source Out 4
SCREW TERMINALS 27
29
31
AG14-0493
Theory of Operation
Inputs
Each input is guaranteed "on" at 14 to 30 VDC and guaranteed "off" at 0 to 5 VDC. This is polarity independent. Its on/off state is converted to a corresponding logic 1 or 0. This logic state is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module where the processor uses it as data in the ladder program. The logic side of the input is optically isolated from the field side. An LED indicates the logic state of each input. Each group is represented by a horizontal row of 4 LEDs. If you need to know whether voltage is present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. The shaded blocks in Figure C10-5 show the limits specified by the IEC. The lines show the maximum and minimum V/I of the inputs in this module. The voltage/ current curve in this graph shows that the input module is well within the IEC Type 1 limits.
C.10 -5
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Figure C10-5. Input Characteristics Compared to IEC Standards
U IN VOLTS UHMAX 30 "ON" REGION 25 UNOM 24
MIN MAX
INPUT VOLTAGE
20
(UTMAX )
UHMIN 15
10
TRANSITION REGION
(UTMIN )
ULMAX 5
0
"OFF" REGION
-5 .5 ITMIN 2 IH MIN 4 6 8 10 12 14 15 I IN mAMPS IMAX
AA40-0690
INPUT CURRENT
C.10 -6
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
IMPORTANT Switching devices can sometimes have a leakage current that exceeds the ITmin (current allowed when off) of an input module. In order to use such a device, an impedance (typically, a resistor) needs to be used in parallel with the input. For example, some of the newer proximity switches use two wires instead of three. The third wire was used for a power or ground line. Without the third wire, the switch is easier to install. However, it requires more leakage current in the off state to power its internal circuitry. As a conservative estimate, use the following formula to calculate an external resistance value. It keeps the input voltage at or below 2.4V when the switching device is in the "off" state. 2.4V -------------------------------------------------------------- R Switch Leakage - 0.75mA If the switch leakage specification is 1.7 mA, then: 2.4V ------------------------------- 2.5K 1.7 - 0.75mA Use a resistor less than or equal to 2.5 K . Be sure that the wattage is adequate for the resistor when the switching device is in the "on" state remembering that: V P = ----R
2
Outputs
Each output point is a solid state switch rated at .75 A. It is turned on or off according to the logic state sent to it by the CPU. If the CPU sends it a logic 1, the switch closes and the device is powered. If the CPU sends a logic 0, the switch opens and power to the device is cut off. The CPU updates the logic state for each switch every time it scans the program. The logic side of the switch is optically isolated from the field side. An LED gives the logic state of each switch. The four LEDs representing a group are in a horizontal row on the module. There are two rows for the two groups. If you need to know whether voltage is actually present at the field side, use a voltmeter on the terminal screws. Each group has its own protective fuse in series with the source to protect against current overload in case the outputs are shorted to ground. In addition, each output is protected with internal clamping diodes. Without clamping, high voltage transients (kickback) from inductive loads might damage the module.
C.10 -7
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Protecting from an Inductive Load
Resistive loads can be connected to the module and controlled by the system with no precautions other than making sure they have a connection to the DCOUT fused supply. When an output is energized, represented on the left in Figure C10-6 by a closed switch, current passes through the load into the common line. When the output is de-energized, represented on the right in C10-6 by an open switch, current stops. The state of the outputs is controlled by the CPU module. Inductive loads have an electrical "kickback" when current is stopped. This can damage or destroy the output switching device. Each output in the Output 24V DC module has a diode through which reverse current can be safely routed. Figure C10-6 shows how the internal diode works with an inductive load. When the output is turned off the inductive field collapses. This creates a reverse voltage across the load called "kickback" which tries to continue the current. The voltage is in series with the DC power supply. The combined voltage appears across the output switching device in the module. If this were the only path available, voltage across the device would peak at several hundred volts. The internal diode provides another path for current. This limits the peak reverse voltage across the load to less than 1 V. You can connect an inductive load to any of the output source terminals.
Figure C10-6. Diagram of Internal Protection for Inductive Loads (Outputs 1 to 8)
DC power supply 0V V+
DCL
IN/OUT MODULE
DC power supply 0V V+
DCL
IN/OUT MODULE
DCCOMMON
INDUCTIVE LOAD
Output switching device
DCCOMMON
Output switching device
-
+
Source Out
+
INDUCTIVE LOAD
Source Out
a) Output energized
b) Output de-energized
AG15-0493
Replacing a fuse
This module has two fuses, one for each group of outputs. Fuses are checked only for groups which have external power applied. If power is applied to a group in which the fuse is blown or missing, the FB LED on the module lights up. The fuse is in series with the HOT line to the group to protect the output switching device and the load. The fuse protects against a short circuit in an output device, but not against a sustained marginal overload current. See the specification table.
C.10 -8
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Follow the procedure below to change a blown fuse.
1. 2.
Turn off the main disconnect switch for the system rack and the external DC power supply to this module. Remove the screw terminal connector. Press down the latch at the top of the module and pull it out of the rack. Lay it on a static-free surface, label side up. Ground yourself using an antistatic wrist strap before you open the module. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the module toward each other and lift off the module cover.
Figure C10-7. Positions of Fuses
3.
DIAG LED LEDs for the outputs "Fuse blown" LED LEDs for the outputs
Fuse for the first group of outputs Screw terminal connector
Fuse for the second group of outputs 64 pin connector to rack Spare fuse
AA836-0493
4.
Identify the fuse that has blown, and use an insulated screwdriver or fuse puller to remove it. Put a new fuse in its slot. The replacement must be a fast-acting 3A 250 VAC fuse. The following are recommended: Littlefuse 235-003 Bussman GMA-3 or an equivalent. For your convenience, there is an extra fuse in the lower front corner of the module.
5.
Replace the module cover, making sure that the top and bottom tabs are fully engaged.
C.10 -9
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
6. 7.
Check the wiring to the devices to find why the fuse blew, and correct the situation before you continue running the program. Slide the module back in its slot, connect the screw terminal connector, and turn power back on. After the diagnostic tests run, the DIAG and the FB LEDs should both be off.
C.10 -10
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Input/Output module specifications
Function
Monitors on/off states from up to 16 DC voltage inputs Sources an external DC source to 8 loads 502-03842-02 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals
Part number Field side connector
Logic side power requirements (typi- 30mA@ +5V cal) 7 mA per energized input @ +5V 23 mA per energized output @ +5V for outputs Field side power dissipation worst case (at 32 VDC) 3.6 W for inputs 6.4 W for outputs
Indicator lights, input/output circuits An LED indicates the logic state of each input/output Indicator light, module Indicator light, fuses The DIAG LED goes OFF when the module passes power-on diagnostic tests A logic side LED lights to indicate a "blown fuse" condition when power is on to a group with missing or open fuse 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
C.10 -11
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
Input section(16 pt)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch). 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
Input signals
Nominal 24 VDC on, 0 VDC off, conforming to IEC Type 1 inputs per IEC 1131-2 (two groups of eight inputs) 30 VDC 7.5 mA Polarity independent 14 VDC
UH Max (max. allowed voltage) IH Max (max. current @ 30 VDC) UL Min Guaranteed on
IH Min (min. current @ UH Min) 2.8 mA Guaranteed off
IT Min (current allowed when off)
5 VDC .75 mA
C.10 -12
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
Time delay on Time delay off Protection of logic circuits
Output section (8 pt source)
1 ms max. 1 ms max. Optical isolation between the logic and field sides, 4000 V peak
DC source requirements Protection of logic circuits Grouping of outputs Fuse per group of 8 switches Maximum current per group Switch characteristics Time delay on for resistive loads Time delay off for resistive loads Leakage current in off state Switch voltage, maximum ON Surge current, maximum Response to scan loss (present)
Nominal 24V DC; range 5 to 32 VDC Optical isolation between the logic and field side Two groups of four solid-state switches. UL 508 spacing Fast-acting, UL rated 3A 250 VAC metric fuse, 5 x 20 mm 2 A of continuous current for the group; each switch is rated at .75 A continuous Solid-state switches 30 sec max 300 sec max 0.5 mA max 1.8 VDC @ .4 A 2.5 A for 40 msec., every 2 seconds All outputs are reset to the OFF state
C.10 -13
24V DC Input/Output Source Module (16/8 points)
C.10 -14
C.11 -
Input Switch Module (16 switches)
Introduction
The input switch module converts the position status of 16 on/off switches mounted on the face plate into logic levels that the CPU can use. The on/off position status of each switch is converted into a corresponding logic 1 or 0 which is transmitted through the system bus to the CPU module. 16 LEDs in the upper section of the module indicate the logic state of each switch input. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure C11-1. INPUT switch module (16)
Name of module Diagnostic LED
INPUT
24V DC
DIAG
1 5 9 13
Indicator LEDs
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Face mounted switches
Door
ON/OFF ON/OFF
Theory of Operation
The switch module contains the same circuitry as the input 24VDC module. In addition, it has an internal 5V to 15VDC converter. This 15VDC source is electrically isolated from the logic and is routed to each face mounted switch. Each
C.11 -1
Input Switch Module (16 switches)
switch can then supply either 15VDC (on) or 0V (off) to an optically isolated input. The switch's on/off state is converted to a corresponding logic 1 or 0. This logic state is transmittted through the system bus to the CPU module where the processor uses it as data in the ladder program. An LED in the upper section of the module indicates the logic state of each input.
Specification Table Characteristic Input switch (16) module specifications
Function Part number Field side connector Protection of logic circuits Indicator lights, input circuits Indicator light, module Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
Monitors on/off states from up to 16 face mounted switches 502-03651-00 25-pin card edge connector, face plate, switches Optical isolation between the logic and field sides An LED indicates the logic state of each switch The DIAG LED goes OFF when the module passes power-on diagnostic tests 2 mA @ +5V 11mA per energized input @ +5V 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
C.11 -2
Input Switch Module (16 switches)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm.
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
C.11 -3
Input Switch Module (16 switches)
C.11 -4
Appendix D - Servo/Feedback Modules
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
D.1 -
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Introduction
The encoder module can interface to two or four independent incremental encoders or equivalent devices. Information from the encoders is used to update four separate position counters and latches within the module. For each channel, a 24-bit counter is incremented or decremented based on signals it receives from the A and B outputs of an encoder. The counter value can be latched (stored) if the module receives either an "index" signal from the encoder or a 24 VDC "fast" input signal. An LED in the upper section of the module goes on when the fast input for each channel is energized. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure D1-1. INPUT ENCODER module
INPUT ENCODER
Name of module Diagnostic LED Indicator LEDs for fast inputs
DIAG
IN1 IN2 IN3 IN4
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA66-0190
D.1 -1
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Connections
All signals to the encoder module must come to its screw terminal connector through shielded twisted pair wires. These wires must be protected against electrical noise because of the speed and/or voltage levels of the signals transmitted through them. See the discussion on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" in the Hardware chapter. Each encoder module channel has four signal pairs, each of which has two screw terminal connections. The signal pairs are: encoder input A encoder input B index input 24 VDC fast input In addition the module has eight screw connections for terminating the shields. All eight are connected together inside the module. They are the same point electrically and are connected internally to SPG.
IMPORTANT The power supply to the encoder (or signal source device) must have its common connected to the SPG. If the 24 VDC "fast" input is used, its power supply common must also be connected to the SPG. Figure D1-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module. To make the diagram more readable, The shielded twisted pair wires are shown with transparent shields. * The shielded twisted pair wires are shown grounded only for channel 4. In an actual application, every cable shield must be grounded. * For the 4 channel module, the fast inputs for channels 1 and 2 are shown in source configuration; those for channels 3 and 4 are shown in sink configuration.
*
D.1 -2
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Figure D1-2. Connections for the Input encoder module (4 ch) terminals
ENCODER POWER SUPPLY For High-Speed, 5 VDC For 2 or 4 Ch, 5 to 15 VDC +V 0V TO SPG A A A A B B index B B INDEX INDEX A A A A B ENCODER B index index B B INDEX INDEX A A A A B ENCODER B index index B B INDEX INDEX A A A A B ENCODER B index index B B INDEX INDEX SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD
1 3 5 7 9 CHANNEL
ENCODER
1
index
CHANNEL
2
11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 CHANNEL CHANNEL
3
4
24 VDC POWER SUPPLY
0V TO SPG 24 V
SHIELD SHIELD FAST INPUT SWITCHES SHIELD SHIELD FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT
31 33 35 37 39 CHANNEL
1 2
CHANNEL CHANNEL
3
CHANNEL
4
D.1 -3
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Encoder Drivers
For 2, 4 , and high-speed encoder modules
Acceptable drivers provided by encoder manufacturers include:
Differential voltage drivers 75183 8830 75114 9614 26LS31
For 2 or 4 channel encoder modules Single-ended open collector drivers 7406
339 type output devices will not work with the Input encoder module (2, 4 ch) because their output current level is too low. NOTE Encoders with differential drivers are strongly recommended. They provide better noise immunity and capability for the module to detect "loss of feedback." See the section in the Hardware chapter on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" for a comparison of signals from differential and single-ended drivers. If the encoder has differential output drivers as shown in Figure D1-3, the three encoder outputs are paired: A and A B and B index and index The high speed encoder module accepts differential inputs only.
D.1 -4
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Figure D1-3. Wiring from an Encoder with Differential Drivers
A A A B ENCODER B index index +ENCODER POWER SUPPLY +V 0V TO SPG A B B INDEX INDEX
1
3 5
25 27
If the 2 or 4 channel encoder has single-ended drivers, there are three single outputs: A, B, and index. Each output is referenced to the +V terminal of the encoder power supply. (See Figure D1-4.)
Figure D1-4. Wiring from an Encoder with Single-Ended Drivers
A
1
A ENCODER B index
A B B INDEX INDEX
3
5
+5 to 15 VDC ENCODER POWER SUPPLY
25
+V 0V
TO SPG
27
The signal at output A or B from the encoder has a frequency that is the product of: the resolution of the encoder in pulses (lines) per revolution, and the speed of the encoder in revolutions per second. Thus an encoder that generates 2,000 pulses (lines) per revolution and rotates at 10 revolutions per second generates 20,000 pulses (lines) per second. In a quadrature
D.1 -5
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
type encoder, the interface module would supply 80,000 Feedback Units per second.
Incremental Encoders
An incremental encoder is a position transducer. It transmits quadrature or pulse type signals through its "A" and "B" outputs with a frequency proportional to the rotational velocity of its shaft. It transmits a pulse through its index output once per revolution of the device. There are two types of incremental encoders, quadrature and pulse. Giddings & Lewis recommends quadrature type encoders, which are the most commonly used. A quadrature encoder sends square wave type signals. When the shaft rotates at a constant velocity, the A and B outputs are square waves and are at the same frequency. However they are out of phase with each other by 90. When the encoder shaft rotates in one direction, each A pulse leads the corresponding B pulse by 90. When it rotates the other direction each A pulse lags its B pulse by 90. The signals illustrated in Figure D1-5 indicate that the encoder shaft rotates in one direction at first. Its speed of rotation decreases to 0 and then it starts rotating the other direction. The signals are shown as differential. A is the inverse of the signal A and B is the inverse of signal B.
Figure D1-5. Signals Transmitted by a Quadrature Encoder with Differential Outputs
OUTPUT ROTATION SPEED 0 A A
B B AA71-2290
A pulse encoder sends pulses through output A for one direction of its shaft rotation, and output B for the other direction. When the shaft is not rotating, no pulse is generated. The signals illustrated in Figure D1-6 indicate that the encoder shaft rotates in one direction at first. Its speed of rotation decreases to 0 and then it starts rotating the other way. The signals are shown as differential, with the inverse of signal A and the inverse of signal B. A pulse encoder may alternate signals at its two outputs, but it cannot send signals from both outputs at the same time.
D.1 -6
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Figure D1-6. Signals Transmitted by a Pulse Encoder with Differential Outputs
OUTPUT ROTATION SPEED 0 A A
B B AA70-1690
Theory of Operation
The encoder module uses differential type inputs to interface with up to four independent incremental encoders.
Quadrature Type For the 2, 4 channel module *
The maximum input frequency is 250,000 lines per second, which results in 1,000,000 Feedback Units (FUs) per second in the encoder module.
For the high-speed module *
The maximum input frequency is 2,500,000 lines per second, which results in 10,000,000 Feedback Units (FUs) per second in the encoder module.
Figure D1-7. Counting quadrature pulses
A B
The module counts positive and negative transitions at both channel A and channel B. One quadrature cycle in this case gives 4 Feedback Units.
Pulse Type For the 2, 4 channel module *
The module can accept up to 500,000 pulses per second at either input.
For the high-speed module *
The module can accept up to 5,000,000 pulses per second at either input.
For each encoder channel, there is a 24-bit up/down counter. It is incremented or decremented in accordance with the counting mode selected. There is also a 24-bit latch associated with each Input encoder module channel.
D.1 -7
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
The module can be programmed so that the counter value is "latched" or stored under one of these conditions: an index pulse from the encoder * a positive or negative transition of the fast input * the next index pulse after the required transition of the fast input
*
Each of the four 24-bit latches has a fast 24 VDC input associated with it. Each input is optically isolated. This input is intended to receive a signal from a device other than an encoder. It is typically used for referencing or synchronization purposes. Fast input characteristics include: The detection of a signal occurs faster than it does for the DC inputs in other modules, due to less filtering. Because of this there is also less noise immunity. * The response to a fast input signal is independent of ladder scan time. The module can be programmed to latch a position count as soon as this input is detected.
*
D.1 -8
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Specification table Characteristic Input Encoder module (2, 4, HS) specifications
Function
Counts pulses from up to 4 encoders Latches the counter value at an index or 24 VDC input event
4 ch 2ch 502-03782-02 502-03786-02 (2.5 VDC - 7 VDC) (3.5 VDC - 16.5 VDC) 502-03782-22 (2.5 VDC - 7 VDC) 502-03786-22 (3.5 VDC - 16.5 VDC)
Part number
high-speed 502-03947-00
2,4 Ch Encoder (A, B, and index) High-speed Encoder Guaranteed on, min. Input voltage, max. Input current, max.
Differential or single ended; differential recommended 2632 differential receiver
502-03782-XX 502-03786-XX
2.5 VDC @ 2.5 mA 3.5 VDC @ 7.3 mA
502-03782-XX 502-03786-XX 502-03947-00 5 VDC 502-03786-XX)
7 VDC
16.5 VDC
502-03782-XX
22 mA @ 7 VDC Input voltage, threshold (high-speed) 200mV 120 Input termination (high-speed) Signal pulse width, min. (2, 4 ch) (high-speed) Quad signal freq, max. (2, 4 ch) (high-speed) Pulse signal freq, max. (2, 4 ch) (high-speed) Field side connection Encoder device .6 s(600 ns) 75 ns
30 mA @ 16.5VDC
250 KHz for A or B input (1 M FU count rate) 2.5 MHz (10M FU count rate) 500 KHz for A or B input (500 KFU count rate) 5 MHz (5M FU count rate) 40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 1. Quadrature type incremental encoder (recommended) 2. Pulse type incremental encoder 24-bit up/down counter 24-bit latch Nominal 24 VDC, switched externally to the module Active high or low Reverse polarity protected 30 VDC
Stored position value range Fast input
Voltage max.
D.1 -9
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
Guaranteed on Guaranteed off Input impedance On/off time, max. Indicator light Indicator light, module
Cable length, max. (2, 4 ch)
15 VDC 5 VDC 2.7 K 50 s LED is lit when current flows into the input DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests 200 ft. @ 250 KHz and 45 quad error (with differential driver) 50 ft. @ 2.5 MHz with 100 ns minimum separation between A and B 572 mA 1 mA 1 mA @ +5V @ +15V @ -15V +5V +5V +5V +5V
Cable length, max. (high speed) Logic side power requirements (typical for 2, 4 ch)
21 mA per energized input @ 12 mA per fast input @ Logic side power requirements (typical for high-speed) Field side power dissipation, worst case (2, 4 ch) Field side power dissipation, worst case (high speed) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity 370 mA 12 mA per fast input 7.4 W 1.5 W from encoder +5V supply 1.6 W from fast input supply 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing @ @
D.1 -10
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
D.1 -11
Input Encoder Module (2, 4, or High-Speed 4 channel)
NOTES
D.1 -12
D.2 -
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
Introduction
The input resolver module can interface to two or four independent resolvers (or equivalent transducers). Information from the resolvers is used to update two or four separate position counters and latches within the module. For each channel, the module sends out two sine waves 90 out of phase with each other and receives a signal whose phase represents the angular position of the resolver. This input signal is used to update a 24-bit counter. This module can be programmed to "latch" (store) the counter value when a signal is received by the fast input for that channel. An LED in the upper section of the module goes on when the fast input for each channel is energized. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure D2-1. INPUT RESOLVER module (4 CH)
INPUT RESOLVER
Name of module Diagnostic LED Indicator LEDs for fast inputs
DIAG
IN1 IN2 IN3 IN4
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA83-1790
D.2 -1
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
Connections
All signals to the resolver module must come to its screw terminal connector through shielded twisted pair wires. These wires must be protected against electrical noise because of the speed and/or voltage levels of the signals transmitted through them. See the discussion in the Hardware chapter on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines". Each input resolver channel has four signal pairs, each of which has two screw terminal connections. The signals are: RPO output QPO output FDBK input 24 VDC fast input In addition the module has eight screw connections for terminating the shields. All eight are connected inside the module so they are the same point electrically.
IMPORTANT If the 24 VDC fast input is used, its power supply common must be connected to the SPG. Figure D2-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module. To make the diagram more readable, The shielded twisted pair wires are shown with transparent shields. * Channel 3 shows how a potentiometer can be wired to the module. * The shielded twisted pair wires are shown grounded only for channel 4. In an actual application, every cable shield must be grounded. * The fast inputs for channels 1 and 2 are shown in source configuration; that for channel 4 is shown in sink configuration.
*
D.2 -2
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
Figure D2-2. Connections for the Input Resolver Terminals
FDBK FDBK (R1) FDBK (R2) FDBK (S1) RPO RESOLVER (S3) RPO (S2) QPO (S4) QPO COLOR KEY R1 R2 S1 S3 S2 S4 RED/WHITE YELLOW/WHITE RED BLACK YELLOW BLUE QPO FDBK (R1) FDBK (R2) FDBK (S1) RPO RESOLVER (S3) RPO (S2) QPO (S4) QPO FDBK RPO RPO QPO QPO FDBK RPO RPO QPO
1 3 5 7 9 CHANNEL
1
CHANNEL
2
11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 CHANNEL CHANNEL
POTENTIOMETER
MIN MAX QPO RPO
3
FDBK FDBK (R1) FDBK (R2) FDBK (S1) RPO RESOLVER (S3) RPO (S2) QPO (S4) QPO RPO RPO QPO QPO SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD
4
24 VDC POWER SUPPLY
0V TO SPG 24 V
SHIELD SHIELD FAST INPUT SWITCHES SHIELD SHIELD FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT FAST INPUT
31 33 35 37 CHANNEL
1 2
CHANNEL CHANNEL
3
FAST INPUT FAST INPUT
39
CHANNEL
4
D.2 -3
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
IMPORTANT If a channel is not being used, tie its FDBK input to its RPO output to ensure proper operation. See Figure D2-3.
Figure D2-3. Unused Channel Connection
FDBK (R1) FDBK (R2) FDBK (S1) RPO RESOLVER (S3) RPO (S2) QPO (S4) QPO FDBK RPO RPO QPO QPO FDBK FDBK RPO RPO QPO QPO
1 3 5 7 9 11 Connect FDBK to RPO on any unused channel. CHANNEL
1
CHANNEL
2
AA1118-3292
Resolvers
A resolver (Figure D2-4) is a servo feedback device which provides absolute position over one electrical revolution. It receives RPO (reference phase output) and QPO (quadrature phase output) signals from the interface module. RPO and QPO signals are sine waves 90 out of phase with each other. They energize two stator coils positioned at 90 to each other. The stator coils induce a sine wave signal called FDBK (feedback) in the rotor coil. The phase of this signal, with respect to RPO, depends on the rotor coil's position.
D.2 -4
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
Figure D2-4. Diagram of a Resolver
R1
S4
QPO
S2
RPO
S1
S3 AA85-1790
The recommended resolver has a part number in the specification sheet at the end of this section. Other resolvers may be used, if they conform to the interface module specifications.
Theory of Operation
The module sends out two sine wave signals, RPO and QPO. These signals have the same voltage amplitude and frequency but are 90 out of phase. The module then receives a FDBK sine wave signal whose phase is a measure of the angular rotation of the resolver. The phase information is used to increment or decrement an internal 24-bit up/ down counter. A phase shift of 360 corresponds to 4,000 counts of resolution, so one count represents 5.4 arc-minutes of rotation of the resolver. The value in the counter thus represents the current position of the resolver. In addition to the counter, there is a 24-bit latch associated with each resolver interface. This module can be programmed so that the counter value is latched or stored when a fast 24 VDC input pulse is received for that channel. Each of the four 24-bit latches has a fast 24 VDC input associated with it. Each input is optically isolated. This input is typically used for referencing or synchronization purposes. Fast input characteristics include: The detection of a signal occurs faster than it does for the DC inputs in other modules, due to less filtering. Because of this there is also less noise immunity. * The response to a fast input signal is independent of ladder scan time. The module can be programmed to latch a position count as soon as this input is detected.
*
R2 ck ba ed Fe
D.2 -5
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Input Resolver module specifications
Function
Measures the position of a transducer that accepts a 2phase quadrature excitation, such as a resolver or potentiometer 4 ch 502-03552-02 2 ch 502-03552-22
Part number Field side connector Excitation method Excitation frequency RPO and QPO outputs Output voltage Current per output channel, max. Resolver transformer ratio Resolution, resolver Resolution, potentiometer Accuracy at constant temperature
40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 2-phase quadrature for control transformer type of resolver 2 KHz
16 VP-P (5.7 VRMS) 4ch 5 mA RMS (14 mA p-p) 2ch 10mARMS (20 mA p-p)
.5 to 1.0 4000 Feedback Units (FUs) per electrical revolution 1000 Feedback Units (FUs) per electrical revolution 20 arc minutes
Accuracy over temperature range 45 arc minutes Electrical velocity, max. Cable length, max. Stored position value range Fast input Reverse polarity protection Voltage max. Guaranteed on Guaranteed off Input impedance On/off time, max. Indicator lights, fast inputs Indicator light, module 15000 RPM (1M FU/Sec.) 200 ft. 24-bit up/down counter 24-bit latch Nominal 24 VDC YES 30 VDC 15 VDC 5 VDC 2.7 K 50 s LED is lit when current flows into the input. DIAG LED goes off when the module passes its diagnostic tests
D.2 -6
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
Logic side power requirements (typical for 4 ch)
473 mA @ 5V 133 mA @+15V 20 mA @-15V 14 mA per energized input @ +15V 14 mA per energized input @ -15V 12 mA per fast input
Logic side power requirements (typical for 2 ch)
296 mA @ 5V 105 mA @ +15V 16 mA @ -15V 14 mA per energized input @ +15V 14 mA per energized input @ -15V 13 mA per fast input
Field side power dissipation, worst case Recommended resolver Other suggested resolvers Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
4 ch
1.4 W
2 ch
.7W
Giddings & Lewis part number 501-98409-00 Harowe 11BRW 300-F-1/10 Clifton 11BHW-0IE/A004 Kearfott CR41095050 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
D.2 -7
Input Resolver Module (2, 4 channel)
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
D.2 -8
D.3 -
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
Introduction
The input multi-channel resolver module can interface to 12 independent resolvers (or equivalent transducers). Feedback information from the resolvers is used to update the on-board memory. The position of each resolver can be read at any time by the PIC900. For each channel, the module sends out two sine waves 90 out of phase with each other and receives a signal whose phase represents the angular position of the resolver. The resolution of the angular position is 4000 counts per revolution or 0.09 degrees. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure D3-1. INPUT RESOLVER (Multi-Channel) Module (12 CH)
INPUT RESOLVER
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA1094-1292
D.3 -1
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
Figure D3-2. Connections for the Input Resolver Terminals
SCREW TERMINALS 1
RPO2 / QPO2
CONNECTIONS
RPO1
CONNECTIONS
RPO2
Up to 6 resolvers
RPO1 / QPO1
3
QPO2
Up to 6 resolvers
QPO1
5
SHIELD
FDBK1
7
SHIELD
9
FDBK1 SHIELD SHIELD
11
FDBK2
FDBK3
13
FDBK2
FDBK3
15
SHIELD
FDBK5
17
FDBK4
FDBK5
19
FDBK4
SHIELD
21
FDBK6
FDBK7
23
FDBK6
FDBK7
25
SHIELD
FDBK9
27
FDBK8
29
FDBK9 FDBK8 SHIELD
31
FDBK10
FDBK11
33
FDBK10
FDBK11
35
FDBK12
SHIELD
37
FDBK12
SHIELD
39
D.3 -2
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
Connections
Figure D3-2 shows the screw terminal connections for the multi-channel resolver module. To connect 12 resolvers to the multi-channel resolver module, two user-supplied external terminal blocks must be used - one for each group of six resolvers as shown in Figure D3-3. (See Figure D3-4 for detail wiring of one resolver.)
Figure D3-3. Using Terminal Blocks to Connect 12 Resolvers
Multi-channel Resolver Module
INPUT RESOLVER
DIAG
Terminal Block RPO/QPO
Resolver 1
Terminal Block RPO/QPO
Resolver 7
Resolver 2
Resolver 8
Resolver 3
Resolver 9
Resolver 4
Resolver 10
Resolver 5
Resolver 11
Resolver 6
Resolver 12
AA1142-4292
Each resolver has three signal pairs. The signals and where they are connected are listed below. All signals from the resolvers must come to the screw terminal connectors (either on the multi-channel resolver or on the terminal block) through shielded twisted pair wires. These wires must be protected against electrical noise because of the speed and/or voltage levels of the signals transmitted through them.
D.3 -3
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
The maximum length of the twisted pair wire from the resolver to the terminal block is 100 feet.
Signal pair from resolver Connection
RPO and /shield QPO and /shield FDBK and /shield
To terminal block To terminal block To multi-channel resolver
The feedback from each resolver is brought back to the appropriate feedback channel connections on the multi-channel resolver module. The module has nine screw connections for terminating the feedback shields. All are connected inside the module so they are the same point electrically. If you are using more than nine resolvers, some of the feedback shields will have to be doubled up on the shield connections. The shields from the RPO and QPO signals are terminated on shield screw connections on the terminal block. The shield at the device end of the cable is not connected. Figure D3-4 shows how to wire a terminal block and the first resolver. The RPO, QPO, and outputs from the module are each connected to the terminal block. Each is then jumpered so that there are six signals of each type available for the six resolvers (RPO1, RPO2,... QPO1, QPO2,... , ,... etc.). 18 AWG wire is recommended for these connections. The maximum wire length between the multi-channel resolver module and the terminal block is 6 feet. The feedback signal from the resolver and its shield are wired directly to the module, not the terminal block.
D.3 -4
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
Figure D3-3. Connecting Resolver to Terminal Block to Module
External Terminal Block
FDBK FDBK (R1) FDBK (R2) FDBK (S1) RPO Resolver (S3) RPO 1 (S2) QPO (S4) QPO RPO RPO QPO RPO3 QPO RPO4 COLOR KEY R1 R2 S1 S3 S2 S4 RED/WHITE YELLOW/WHITE RED BLACK YELLOW BLUE RPO5 RPO6 RPO1/QPO1 RPO2/QPO2 RPO3/QPO3 RPO1 RPO2
(use to connect up to six resolvers)
Resolver Module Screw Terminals
RPO2 RPO1
1
RPO2 / QPO2
RPO1 / QPO1
3
QPO2
QPO1
5
SHIELD
FDBK1
7
SHIELD
FDBK1
9
SHIELD
SHIELD
11
FDBK2
Make appropriate connections for remaining resolvers
RPO4/QPO4 RPO5/QPO5 RPO6/QPO6 FDBK3
13
FDBK2
Resolver 2
QPO1 QPO2
FDBK3
15
SHIELD
FDBK5 QPO3 QPO4 FDBK5
17
FDBK4
19
FDBK4
Resolver 3
QPO5 QPO6 SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD FDBK7 SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD FDBK9 FDBK9 FDBK7 SHIELD
21
FDBK6
23
FDBK6
25
SHIELD
Resolver 4
SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD
27
FDBK8
29
FDBK8
Resolver 5
SHIELD
31
FDBK10
FDBK11
33
FDBK10
FDBK11
35
FDBK12
Resolver 6
SHIELD
37
FDBK12
SHIELD
39
D.3 -5
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
Resolvers
A resolver (Figure D3-5) is a servo feedback device which provides absolute position over one electrical revolution. It receives RPO (reference phase output) and QPO (quadrature phase output) signals from the interface module. RPO and QPO signals are sine waves 90 out of phase with each other. They energize two stator coils positioned at 90 to each other. The stator coils induce a sine wave signal called FDBK (feedback) in the rotor coil. The phase of this signal, with respect to RPO, depends on the rotor coil's position.
Figure D3-4. Diagram of a Resolver
R1
S4
QPO
S2
RPO
S1
S3 AA85-1790
The recommended resolver has a part number in the specification sheet at the end of this section. Other resolvers may be used if they conform to the interface module specifications.
Theory of Operation
The module sends out two sine wave signals, RPO and QPO. These signals have the same voltage amplitude and frequency but are 90 out of phase. The module then receives a FDBK sine wave signal whose phase is a measure of the angular rotation of the resolver. A phase shift of 360 corresponds to 4,000 counts of resolution, so one count represents 5.4 arc-minutes of rotation of the resolver. The value in the on-board memory represents the current position of the resolver. The on-board memory position is updated every 3.0 msec for each of the 12 resolvers. There is a loss of feedback indicator for each resolver.
D.3 -6
R2 ck ba ed Fe
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Input Resolver (12 ch) ModuleSpecifications
Function
Measures the position of a transducer that accepts a 2phase quadrature excitation, such as a resolver or potentiometer 502-03722-02 40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 2-phase quadrature for control transformer type of resolver 4KHz
Part number Field side connector Excitation method Excitation frequency RPO and QPO outputs Output voltage Current per output channel, max. Resolver transformer ratio Resolution, resolver Resolution, potentiometer
15 VP-P (5.3VRMS)
100 mA .5 to 1.0 4000 Feedback Units (FUs) per electrical revolution 1000 Feedback Units (FUs) per electrical revolution
Accuracy at constant temperature 12 arc minutes Accuracy over temperature range 5.4 arc minutes /10F Velocity, max. Cable length, max. Stored position value range Indicator light, module Logic side power requirements (typical) Recommended resolver Other suggested resolvers Operating temperature range Storage temperature range 15000 electrical RPM (1M FU/Sec.) 6 ft. from module to terminal block (18 AWG) 100 ft. from terminal block to resolvers (twisted pair) 0-3999 DIAG LED goes off when the module passes its power-on diagnostic tests 200 mA @ +5V 60 mA @ +15V 60 mA @ -15V Giddings & Lewis part number 501-98409-00 Harowe 11BRW 300-F-1/10 Clifton 11BHW-0IE/A004 Kearfott CR410959 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F)
D.3 -7
Input Multi-Channel Resolver Module (12 channel)
Humidity CE Marked
5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed
Physical size
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers
1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
D.3 -8
D.4 -
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Introduction
The servo encoder module provides:
* * * * 2 analog output channels 4 analog input channels 3 encoder input channels 3 fast inputs
An LED goes on when the fast input for each encoder channel is energized. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure D4-1. Servo Encoder Module
SERVO ENCODER
Name of module Diagnostic LED Fast input LEDs
DIAG
IN1 IN2 IN3
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AG11-0493
D.4 -1
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Connections
All signals to the module must come to the screw terminal connectors through shielded twisted pair wires. Shielded twisted pair wires are used to connect: * * * * Each analog output channel to a receiving device. All analog input signals to the module. All encoder signals to the module. All fast input signals to the module.
These wires must be protected against electrical noise because of the speed and/or voltage levels of the signals transmitted through them. See the discussion on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" in the Hardware chapter.
IMPORTANT One end of the shield from the twisted pair wire must be connected to chassis ground. Any power supplies used must be connected to the Single Point Ground. Figure D4-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module.
D.4 -2
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Figure D4-2. Connections for the Servo I Encoder Module Terminals
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS 1 An Out Ch 2+ An Out Ch 2An In Ch 2+ An In Ch 23 An In Ch 1+ 5 An In Ch 17 CONNECTIONS An Out Ch 1+
Analog Output
Analog Output
An Out Ch 1-
Analog Input
Analog Input
Ch 1 250 resistor Ch 2 250 resistor An In Ch 4+ An In Ch 4Ch 4 250 resistor Enc Ch 1 A Enc Ch 1 B 9 An In Ch 3+ 11 An In Ch 313 Ch 3 250 resistor 15 Enc Ch 1 A 17 Enc Ch 1 B 19 Enc Ch 1 Index Enc Ch 1 Index Enc Ch 2 A Enc Ch 2 B Enc Ch 2 Index Enc Ch 3 A 21 Enc Ch 2 A 23 Enc Ch 2 B
Encoder Input
Encoder Input
25 Enc Ch 2 Index 27 Enc Ch 3 A 29 Enc Ch 3 B
Enc Ch 3 B
31 Enc Ch 3 Index 33 Ch 1+ Fast Input 35 Ch 2+ Fast Input
Enc Ch 3 Index
Fast Input
Fast Input
Ch 1- Fast Input Ch 2- Fast Input Ch 3- Fast Input
37 Ch 3+ Fast Input 39
AG09-0393
D.4 -3
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Analog Output Connections
You may connect the differential type output from this module to a single-ended or differential input device. Figure D4-3 shows the difference between the two types of connections. Note that one wire in the twisted pair is connected to the 0 V terminal on the single-ended receiving device. This 0V terminal must be referenced to the SPG through the device's ground connection.
Figure D4-3. Differential and Single-Ended Receiving Devices
Receiving Device Differential input device
CH1 CH1
Analog Out Section
GND
1
CH1
CH1 CH2 0V
Channel 1 Channel 2
To SPG
GND
CH2 CH2
3
Single-ended input device
To SPG
D.4 -4
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Analog Input Connections
Each input channel has three connection pins. The signals are: + voltage input - voltage input 250 ohm current sense resistor for 0/20 mA and 4/20 mA applications When connecting an analog voltage output device to the module, the positive wire of the twisted pair goes to the + screw terminal and the negative wire goes to the screw terminal. Figure D4-4 illustrates these connections for channel one. Notice that no connection is made to the screw terminal with the internal 250 resistor when connecting a voltage source device.
Figure D4-4. Voltage Input Connections Analog Input Section
Voltage signal source
+ -
Ch 1 +
5 Channel 1
Ch 1 Ch 1 250 ohm Resistor
7 9 11 13 15
To SPG
D.4 -5
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
When using a 0 to 20 mA or 4 to 20 mA current output device, the positive wire of the twisted pair is connected to the + input and the negative wire is connected to the 250 resistor input. A jumper is placed between the - input and the 250 resistor input as shown in Figure D4-5 (from pin 8 to pin 10 for channel 2). This connects a 250 internal resistor across the input.
Figure D4-5. Current Input Connections (0 to 20 or 4 to 20 mA)
Analog Input Section
Current signal source
0 to 20 or 4 to 20 mA
5
Ch 2 +
Power + supply
+ Ch 2 -
-
7 9
To SPG
Ch 2 250 ohm Resistor
11 13 15
D.4 -6
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
An alternative method of connecting a two wire 4 to 20 mA current device is shown in Figure D4-6. Place a jumper between the - input and the 250 resistor input.
Figure D4-6. Current Input Connections (4 to 20 mA)
Current signal source
+ Input from power supply
Output
Analog Input Section
5
Ch 2 +
Power supply
+ -
Ch 2 -
7 9
Ch 2 250 ohm Resistor
11 13 15
To SPG
D.4 -7
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Figure D4-7 illustrates an example of wiring an external potentiometer to the module using twisted pair wire. For this example, set up the channel initialization function (A_INCHIT) in software for 5 V unipolar with a filter of 100 ms. The 5 V power supply output voltage adjustment can be set for the maximum potentiometer output value. For example, the supply could be adjusted until the VALU output of the analog input channel read function (A_INCHRD) reads 4095 with the pot at its maximum position.
Figure D4-7. Adding an External Potentiometer Analog Input Section
5Volt Adjustable Regulated Power supply
1K to 50K Pot
5
Ch 2 + Ch 2 -
+ -
7 9
To SPG
Ch 2 250 ohm Resistor
11 13 15
D.4 -8
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Encoder Connections
Each encoder channel has four signal pairs, each of which has two screw terminal connections. The signal pairs are: encoder input A encoder input B index input 24 VDC fast input
Encoder Drivers
Information from the encoders is used to update three separate position counters and latches within the module. For each channel, a 24-bit counter is incremented or decremented based on signals it receives from the A and B outputs of an encoder. The counter value can be latched (stored) if the module receives either an "index" signal from the encoder or a 24 VDC "fast" input signal. Acceptable drivers provided by encoder manufacturers include: Differential voltage drivers 75183 8830 75114 9614 7513 26LS31 7406
Single-ended open collector drivers
339 type output devices will not work with the module because their output current level is too low.
NOTE Encoders with differential drivers are strongly recommended. They provide better noise immunity and capability for the module to detect "loss of feedback." See the section in the Hardware chapter on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" for a comparison of signals from differential and single-ended drivers.
D.4 -9
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
If the encoder has differential output drivers as shown in Figure D4-8, the three encoder outputs are paired: A and A B and B index and index
Figure D4-8. Wiring from an Encoder with Differential Drivers
5 VDC ENCODER POWER SUPPLY 0V +V
Encoder Input Section
TO SPG
-+ -+
ENCODER
AA A A B B B index index
A A B B INDEX INDEX
17 19 21 Channel 1
D.4 -10
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
If an encoder has single-ended drivers, there are three single outputs: A, B, and index. Each output is referenced to the + V terminal of the encoder power supply. See Figure D4-9.
Figure D4-9. Wiring from an Encoder with Single-Ended Drivers
5 VDC ENCODER POWER SUPPLY 0V +V
Encoder Input Section
TO SPG
-+ -+
ENCODER
AA A B index
A A B B INDEX INDEX
17 19 21
Channel 1
IMPORTANT The minimum width signal that can be accepted by the encoder section is 0.6 seconds. The signal at output A or B from the encoder has a frequency that is the product of the resolution of the encoder in pulses (lines) per revolution and the speed of the encoder in revolutions per second. Thus an encoder that generates 2,000 pulses (lines) per revolution and rotates at 10 revolutions per second generates 20,000 pulses (lines) per second. In a quadrature type encoder, the interface module would supply 80,000 Feedback Units per second.
D.4 -11
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Fast inputs should be connected as shown in Figure D4-10.
Figure D4-10. Fast Input Connections
24 VDC POWER SUPPLY
0V 24 V
Fast Input Switches Source
Fast Input Section
FAST INPUT FAST INPUT
35 37 39
Channel 1 Channel 2
TO SPG
FAST INPUT FAST INPUT
Sink
Incremental encoders
An incremental encoder is a position transducer. It transmits quadrature or pulse type signals through its "A" and "B" outputs with a frequency proportional to the rotational velocity of its shaft. It transmits a pulse through its index output once per revolution of the device. There are two types of incremental encoders, quadrature and pulse. Giddings & Lewis recommends quadrature type encoders, which are the most commonly used. A quadrature encoder sends square wave type signals. When the shaft rotates at a constant velocity, the A and B outputs are square waves and are at the same frequency. However they are out of phase with each other by 90. When the encoder shaft rotates in one direction, each A pulse leads the corresponding B pulse by 90. When it rotates the other direction each A pulse lags its B pulse by 90. The signals illustrated in Figure D4-11 indicate that the encoder shaft rotates in one direction at first. Its speed of rotation decreases to 0 and then it starts rotating the other direction. The signals are shown as differential. A is the inverse of the signal A and B is the inverse of signal B.
Figure D4-11. Signals Transmitted by a Quadrature Encoder with Differential Outputs
OUTPUT ROTATION SPEED 0 A A
B B AA71-2290
D.4 -12
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
A pulse encoder sends pulses through output A for one direction of its shaft rotation, and output B for the other direction. When the shaft is not rotating, no pulse is generated. The signals illustrated in Figure D4-12 indicate that the encoder shaft rotates in one direction at first. Its speed of rotation decreases to 0 and then it starts rotating the other way. The signals are shown as differential, with the inverse of signal A and the inverse of signal B. A pulse encoder may alternate signals at its two outputs, but it cannot send signals from both outputs at the same time.
Figure D4-12. Signals Transmitted by a Pulse Encoder with Differential Outputs
ROTATION SPEED 0 A A
OUTPUT
B B AA70-1690
Analog Output Theory of Operation
The CPU sends the analog output section a 16-bit digital word for each analog output channel used. Each digital word is converted to a corresponding voltage within the range of 11 V. The voltage is buffered and brought out to a pair of screw terminal connections as a differential type voltage output. This output is less subject to interference from electrical noise than a single-ended output would be. You can adjust each analog output channel in software for offset adjustments, gain scaling, and unipolar outputs. For safety reasons, all outputs are automatically reset to 0 V when a scan loss condition occurs.
Analog Input Theory of Operation
A 12 bit A/D converter samples each analog input channel in sequence at the input scan rate. These values are stored in memory on the module so that any channel value can be read while the A/D converter is processing another channel sample. Each channel can be set up for a maximum input sensitivity of .125 V to 10 V, bipolar or unipolar, or for 4 to 20 mA or 0 to 20 mA current input. To sense current the internal 250 resistor must be connected as shown in Figures D4-5 or D46. All inputs are differential with the input signals electrically isolated from the logic side and filtered for a high degree of noise immunity.
D.4 -13
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
The default noise filter time constant is 1 ms. If more noise filtering is required, two longer time constants, 10 ms and 100 ms, are software selectable. The longer time constants will improve noise immunity but lengthen signal response time. Using the longer time constants may reduce closed position loop performance if the input is used for position feedback.
Encoder Theory of Operation
The encoder section uses differential type inputs to interface with up to three independent incremental encoders. These inputs are optically isolated and current limited.
*
From a quadrature type, the maximum input frequency is 250,000 lines per second, which results in 1,000,000 Feedback Units (FUs) per second in the module.
Figure D4-13. Counting Quadrature Pulses
A B
The module counts positive and negative transitions at both channel A and channel B. One quadrature cycle in this case gives 4 Feedback Units.
*
From a pulse type, the module can accept up to 500,000 pulses per second at either input.
There is a 24-bit up/down counter on the module. It is incremented or decremented in accordance with the counting mode selected. There is also a 24-bit latch associated with each encoder channel. The module can be programmed so that the counter value is "latched" or stored under one of these conditions: An index pulse from the encoder * A positive or negative transition of the fast input * The next index pulse after the required transition of the fast input
*
Each of the four 24-bit latches has a fast 24 VDC input associated with it. Each input is optically isolated. This input is intended to receive a signal from a device other than an encoder. It is typically used for referencing or synchronization purposes. Fast input characteristics include: The detection of a signal occurs faster than it does for the DC inputs in other modules, due to less filtering. Because of this there is also less noise immunity. * The response to a fast input signal is independent of ladder scan time. The module can be programmed to latch a position count as soon as this input is detected.
*
D.4 -14
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Specification Table
Characteristic
Servo Encoder module specifications
Function
Converts a 16-bit digital word into a 11V analog output signal for each of two channels Converts an analog input signal into a 12-bit digital word for each of four channels. Counts pulses from up to three encoders Latches the counter value at an index or 24 VDC fast input event
Part number Logic side power requirements (typical)
502-03839-04 482 mA @ +5V 42 mA @ +15V 62 mA @ -15V Analog Output 1 mA per energized output 11 mA per energized output 11 mA per energized output Analog Input 120 mA 112 mA Encoder 21 mA per energized input @ +5V 12 mA per fast input @ +5V 40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 7.4 W DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests LED is lit when current flows into the fast input 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing @ +5V @ +15V @ +5V @ +15V @ -15V
Field side connection
Field side power dissipation, worst case
Indicator light, module Indicator light Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
D.4 -15
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Analog Output section (2 ch)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
Output channels Resolution Output voltage characteristics Nominal voltage range Voltage accuracy @ 11 V Output current, max. @ 10V Output update time increment Output voltage after power up Response to "scan loss" Output ripple Short circuit protection
2 16 bits, or 65536 steps over the full output range
11 VDC 5% 10 mA 32 sec 0 V 20 mV
All outputs reset to 0 V 20 mV < 10 mVRMS at 30 KHz
Current limited outputs
D.4 -16
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Response to scan loss (present) Response to scan loss (future)
All outputs are reset to the OFF state Software selectable: All outputs reset to the OFF state All outputs retain their current state
Analog Input section (4 ch)
Input channels Resolution Input sensitivity (software selectable) Voltage ranges
4 12 bits, or 4096 steps over the full input range
Unipolar 0 to 10 V 0 to 5V 0 to 2.5V 0 to 1.25V 0 to 1V 0 to .5 V 0 to .25V 0 to .125V
Bipolar 10 V 5 V 2.5 V 1.25V 1 V .5 V .25 V .125 V
Current range
0 to 20 mA, 4 to 20 mA
Common mode maximum voltage 40V (The maximum voltage that can safely be applied between either input terminal and circuit common.) Common mode operating voltage 11V (The maximum voltage that can be applied between either input terminal and circuit common with inputs still operating properly.) Internal current sense resistor Maximum current sense resistor power Differential input resistance (each input to ground) Filter time constant - software selection Accuracy 250 ohms .12 W 1 M Ohms 1 ms, 10 ms, 100 ms .5% of FSR at 25oC 100 PPM /oC From 2 counts @ 10V to 8 counts @ .125V
D.4 -17
0 Offset
Servo Module Encoder with Analog Input
Encoder Input section (3 ch)
Input Encoder (3 ch) (A, B, and index) Guaranteed on, min. Input voltage, max. Input current, max. Signal pulse width, min. Quadrature signal frequency, max. Pulse encoder signal frequency, max. Encoder device
Differential or single ended; differential recommended 2.5 VDC @ 2.5 mA 7 VDC 22 mA @ 7 VDC .6 s(600 ns) 250 KHz for A or B input (1 M FU count rate) 500 KHz for A or B input (500 KFU count rate) 1. Quadrature type incremental encoder (recommended) 2. Pulse type incremental encoder 24-bit up/down counter 24-bit latch Nominal 24 VDC, switched externally to the module Active high or low Reverse polarity protected 30 VDC 15 VDC 5 VDC 2.7 K 50 s 200 ft. @ 250 KHz and 45 quad error (with differential driver) 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
Stored position value range Fast input
Voltage max. Guaranteed on Guaranteed off Input impedance On/off time, max. Cable length, max. Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
D.4 -18
D.5 -
Servo Module Encoder
Introduction
Depending on the model you have, the Servo encoder module provides:
* * * 4, 3, or 2 analog output channels 3, 2, or 1 encoder input channels 3, 2, or 1 fast input
An LED goes on when the fast input for each encoder channel is energized. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure D5-1. Servo Encoder Module
SERVO ENCODER
Name of module Diagnostic LED Fast input LEDs
DIAG
IN1 IN2 IN3
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AG11-0493
D.5 -1
Servo Module Encoder
Connections
All signals to the module must come to the screw terminal connectors through shielded twisted pair wires. Shielded twisted pair wire is used to connect: * * * Each analog output channel to a receiving device All encoder signals to the module All fast input signals to the module
These wires must be protected against electrical noise because of the speed and/or voltage levels of the signals transmitted through them. See the discussion on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" in the Hardware chapter. The module has eight screw terminal connections for terminating the shields. All eight are connected internally to SPG. The shield at the device end of the cable is not connected. Figure D5-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module.
D.5 -2
Servo Module Encoder
Figure D5-2. Connections for the Servo Encoder Module Terminals
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS 1 An Out Ch 2+ An Out Ch 2An Out Ch 3An Out Ch 43 An Out Ch 3+ 5 An Out Ch 4+ 7 Shield Shield Shield Shield 9 Shield 11 Shield 13 Shield Shield Enc Ch 1 A Enc Ch 1 B 15 Enc Ch 1 A 17 Enc Ch 1 B 19 Enc Ch 1 Index Enc Ch 1 Index Enc Ch 2 A 21 Enc Ch 2 A 23 Enc Ch 2 B CONNECTIONS An Out Ch 1+ An Out Ch 1-
Analog Output
Analog Output
Encoder Input
Encoder Input
Enc Ch 2 B Enc Ch 2 Index Enc Ch 3 A
25 Enc Ch 2 Index 27 Enc Ch 3 A 29 Enc Ch 3 B
Enc Ch 3 B
31 Enc Ch 3 Index
Enc Ch 3 Index
33 Ch 1+ Fast Input
Fast Input
Fast Input
Ch 1- Fast Input Ch 2- Fast Input Ch 3- Fast Input
35 Ch 2+ Fast Input 37 Ch 3+ Fast Input 39
AG08-0393
D.5 -3
Servo Module Encoder
Analog Output Connections
You may connect the differential type output from the analog output section to a single-ended or differential input device. Figure D5-3 shows the two types of connections. Note that one wire in the twisted pair is connected to the 0 V terminal on the single-ended receiving device. This 0 V terminal must be referenced to the SPG through the device's ground connection.
Figure D5-3. Differential and Single-Ended Receiving Devices
Receiving Device Differential input device
CH1 CH1
Analog Out Section
GND
1
CH1
CH1 CH2 0V
Channel 1 Channel 2
To SPG
GND
CH2 CH2
3 5
Single-ended input device
To SPG
7 9 11 13 15 Shields
Encoder Connections
Each encoder channel has four signal pairs, each of which has two screw terminal connections. The signal pairs are: encoder input A encoder input B index input 24 VDC fast input
D.5 -4
Servo Module Encoder
IMPORTANT The power supply to the encoder (or signal source device) must have its common connected to the Single Point Ground. If the 24 VDC "fast" input is used, its power supply common must also be connected to the Single Point Ground.
Encoder Drivers
Information from the encoders is used to update four separate position counters and latches within the module. For each channel, a 24-bit counter is incremented or decremented based on signals it receives from the A and B outputs of an encoder. The counter value can be latched (stored) if the module receives either an "index" signal from the encoder or a 24 VDC "fast" input signal. Acceptable drivers provided by encoder manufacturers include:
Differential voltage drivers 75183 8830 75114 9614 7513 26LS31 7406
Single-ended open collector drivers
339 type output devices will not work with the Input encoder module (4 ch) because their output current level is too low.
NOTE Encoders with differential drivers are strongly recommended. They provide better noise immunity and capability for the module to detect "loss of feedback." See the section in the Hardware chapter on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" for a comparison of signals from differential and single-ended drivers. If the encoder has differential output drivers as shown in Figure D5-4, the three encoder outputs are paired: A and A B and B index and index
D.5 -5
Servo Module Encoder
Figure D5-4. Wiring from an Encoder with Differential Drivers
9
55 VDC VDC ENCODER ENCODER POWER POWER SUPPLY SUPPLY 0V +V
11 13 Shields
Encoder Input Section
TO SPG A AA A A B B B index index A B B INDEX INDEX
15 17 19 Channel 1
-+ -+
ENCODER
21
If an encoder has single-ended drivers, there are three single outputs: A, B, and index. Each output is referenced to the + V terminal of the encoder power supply. See Figure D5-5.
Figure D5-5. Wiring from an Encoder with Single-Ended Drivers Encoder Input Section
9
5 VDC ENCODER POWER SUPPLY 0V +V
11 13 15 Shields
To SPG
-+ -+
A A A B B
A A B B index INDEX INDEX
17 19 Channel 1
ENCODER
21
D.5 -6
Servo Module Encoder
IMPORTANT The minimum width signal that can be accepted by the encoder section is 0.6 seconds. The signal at output A or B from the encoder has a frequency that is the product of the resolution of the encoder in pulses (lines) per revolution and the speed of the encoder in revolutions per second. Thus an encoder that generates 2,000 pulses (lines) per revolution and rotates at 10 revolutions per second generates 20,000 pulses (lines) per second. In a quadrature type encoder, the interface module would supply 80,000 Feedback Units per second. The fast input is connected as shown in Figure D5-6.
Figure D5-6. Fast Input Connections
9 11 Shields 13 24 VDC POWER SUPPLY
0V 24 V
Fast Input Switches Source
15
Fast Input Section
FAST INPUT FAST INPUT
35 37
TO SPG
FAST INPUT FAST INPUT
Channel 1 Channel 2
Sink
39
Incremental encoders
An incremental encoder is a position transducer. It transmits quadrature or pulse type signals through its "A" and "B" outputs with a frequency proportional to the rotational velocity of its shaft. It transmits a pulse through its index output once per revolution of the device. There are two types of incremental encoders, quadrature and pulse. Giddings & Lewis recommends quadrature type encoders, which are the most commonly used.
D.5 -7
Servo Module Encoder
A quadrature encoder sends square wave type signals. When the shaft rotates at a constant velocity, the A and B outputs are square waves and are at the same frequency. However they are out of phase with each other by 90. When the encoder shaft rotates in one direction, each A pulse leads the corresponding B pulse by 90. When it rotates the other direction each A pulse lags its B pulse by 90. The signals illustrated in Figure D5-7 indicate that the encoder shaft rotates in one direction at first. Its speed of rotation decreases to 0 and then it starts rotating the other direction. The signals are shown as differential. A is the inverse of the signal A and B is the inverse of signal B.
Figure D5-7. Signals Transmitted by a Quadrature Encoder with Differential Outputs
OUTPUT ROTATION SPEED 0 A A
B B AA71-2290
A pulse encoder sends pulses through output A for one direction of its shaft rotation, and output B for the other direction. When the shaft is not rotating, no pulse is generated. The signals illustrated in Figure D5-8 indicate that the encoder shaft rotates in one direction at first. Its speed of rotation decreases to 0 and then it starts rotating the other way. The signals are shown as differential, with the inverse of signal A and the inverse of signal B. A pulse encoder may alternate signals at its two outputs, but it cannot send signals from both outputs at the same time.
Figure D5-8. Signals transmitted by a pulse encoder with differential outputs
ROTATION SPEED 0 A A
OUTPUT
B B AA70-1690
Analog Output Theory of Operation
The CPU sends the analog output section a 16-bit digital word for each analog output channel used. Each digital word is converted to a corresponding voltage within the range of 11 V. The voltage is buffered and brought out to a pair of screw terminal connections as a differential type voltage output. This output is less subject to interference from electrical noise than a single-ended output would be.
D.5 -8
Servo Module Encoder
You can adjust each analog output channel in software for offset adjustments, gain scaling, and unipolar outputs. For safety reasons, all outputs are automatically reset to 0 V when a scan loss condition occurs.
Encoder Theory of Operation
The encoder section uses differential type inputs to interface with up to three independent incremental encoders. These inputs are optically isolated and current limited.
*
From a quadrature type, the maximum input frequency is 250,000 lines per second, which results in 1,000,000 Feedback Units (FUs) per second in the encoder module.
Figure D5-9. Counting Quadrature Pulses
A B
The module counts positive and negative transitions at both channel A and channel B. One quadrature cycle in this case gives 4 Feedback Units.
*
From a pulse type, the module can accept up to 500,000 pulses per second at either input.
There is a 24-bit up/down counter on the module. It is incremented or decremented in accordance with the counting mode selected. There is also a 24-bit latch associated with each encoder channel. The module can be programmed so that the counter value is "latched" or stored under one of these conditions: an index pulse from the encoder * a positive or negative transition of the fast input * the next index pulse after the required transition of the fast input
*
Each of the four 24-bit latches has a fast 24 VDC input associated with it. Each input is optically isolated. This input is intended to receive a signal from a device other than an encoder. It is typically used for referencing or synchronization purposes. Fast input characteristics include: the detection of a signal occurs faster than it does for the DC inputs in other modules, due to less filtering. Because of this there is also less noise immunity. * the response to a fast input signal is independent of ladder scan time. The module can be programmed to latch a position count as soon as this input is detected.
*
D.5 -9
Servo Module Encoder
Specification Table
Characteristic
Servo module encoder specifications
Function
Converts a 16-bit digital word into a 11V analog output signal for each of two channels Counts pulses from up to three encoders Latches the counter value at an index or 24 VDC input event
Part number
502-03840-04 502-03840-24 502-03840-44
4 Analog Outputs/3 Encoder Inputs 3 Analog Outputs/2 Encoder Inputs 2 Analog Outputs/1 Encoder Input
Logic side power requirements (typical)
413 mA @ +5V 55 mA @ +15V 51 mA @ -15V Analog Output 1 mA per energized output 11 mA per energized output 11 mA per energized output Encoder 21 mA per energized input 12 mA per fast input @ +5V @ +5V @ +5V @ +15V @ -15V
Field side connection
Field side power dissipation, worst case
40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 7.4 W DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests LED is lit when current flows into the fast input 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
Indicator light, module Indicator light, fast inputs Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
D.5 -10
Servo Module Encoder
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
Analog Output section (4, 3, or 2 ch)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
Resolution Output voltage characteristics Nominal voltage range Voltage accuracy @ 11 V Output current, max. @ 10V Output update time increment Output voltage after power up Response to "scan loss" Output ripple Short circuit protection Response to scan loss
16 bits, or 65536 steps over the full output range
11 VDC 5% 10 mA 32 sec 0 V 20 mV
All outputs reset to 0 V 20 mV < 10 mVRMS at 30 KHz
Current limited outputs All outputs are reset to the OFF state
D.5 -11
Servo Module Encoder
Encoder Input section (3, 2, or 1 ch)
Input Encoder (A, B, and index) Guaranteed on, min Input voltage, max Input current, max Signal pulse width, min
Differential or single ended; differential recommended 2.5 VDC @ 2.5 mA 7 VDC 22 mA @ 7 VDC .6 s(600 ns)
Quadrature signal frequency, max 250 KHz for A or B input (1 M FU count rate) Pulse encoder signal frequency, max Encoder device 500 KHz for A or B input (500 KFU count rate) 1. Quadrature type incremental encoder (recommended) 2. Pulse type incremental encoder 24-bit up/down counter 24-bit latch Nominal 24 VDC, switched externally to the module Active high or low Reverse polarity protected 30 VDC 15 VDC 5 VDC 2.7 K 50 s 200 ft. @ 250 KHz and 45 quad error (with differential driver) 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
Stored position value range Fast input
Voltage max Guaranteed on Guaranteed off Input impedance On/off time, max Cable length, max Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6)
D.5 -12
D.6 -
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Introduction
The output stepper motor control module (SMCM) can control up to eight stepper drives. The maximum step rate is one million steps per second. An external power supply (4.5 VDC to 20 VDC) is required for operation. Commands and control data are sent to the module, and status and position information are received from the module, via software. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure D6-1. OUTPUT STEPPER Module (2, 4, 8 ch)
OUTPUTSTEPPER
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA854-2491
D.6 -1
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each output and for the external power supply connection. (See Figure D6-2.) The outputs are optically isolated. (See Figure D6-3.) The external DC supply that powers the output signals should have a wire connected from its 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the rack's single point ground. The power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the Central Service Module. In the power distribution diagrams in the Hardware chapter, a DC supply was set up according to these guidelines. The external DC supply can be provided by any combination of the following:
* *
The stepper drive
An external DC supply daisy-chained to several channels * Separate external DC supplies for individual channels
D.6 -2
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Figure D6-2. Screw terminal connection assignments
CONNECTIONS
SCREW TERMINALS
CONNECTIONS
CH 1 +V INPUT
CH 2 +V INPUT
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
CH2 STEP/CW
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 2
CH 2 DIRECTION/CCW
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
Channel 1
CH 2 +V COMMON
7
SHIELD
SHIELD
9
CH 3 +V INPUT
CH 4 +V INPUT
11
CH 3 STEP/CW
CH 4 STEP/CW
13
CH 3 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 4
CH 4 DIRECTION/CCW
15
CH 3 +V COMMON
Channel 3
CH 4 +V COMMON
17
SHIELD
SHIELD
19
CH 5 +V INPUT
CH 6 +V INPUT
21
CH 5 STEP/CW
CH 6 STEP/CW
23
CH 5 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 6
CH 6 DIRECTION/CCW
25
CH 5 +V COMMON
Channel 5
CH 6 +V COMMON
27
SHIELD
SHIELD
29
CH 7 +V INPUT
CH 8 +V INPUT
31
CH 7 STEP/CW
CH 8 STEP/CW
33
CH 7 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 8
CH 8 DIRECTION/CCW
35
CH 7 +V COMMON
Channel 7
CH 8 +V COMMON
37
SHIELD
SHIELD
39
AA855-2491
D.6 -3
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Connections for one channel are illustrated on the right in Figure D6-3. +V input Step/cw output Direction/ccw output Common to the +V terminal of the external power supply to the step or clockwise input of the drive to direction or counterclockwise input of the drive to the 0V terminal of the external power supply NOTE: When the drive inputs are optically isolated, tie the 0V of the external power supply to SPG. All shield pins on the module are connected to each other internally and AC coupled to SPG.
Figure D6-3. Connections for One Channel
Shield
Stepper Module
Internal Circuitry Connections
CH 1 +V INPUT
External DC Supply +V 0V
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
SPG
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
7
SHIELD
9
SPG
D.6 -4
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Connecting the SMCM to Stepper Drives
Consult your drive manual regarding the proper connection of an indexer such as the SMCM. Four types of drive inputs and the proper connection techniques are shown in Figures D6-4 to D6-7. When working with opto-coupler drive inputs, be sure the input diode is protected by a current-limiting resistor as stated in the following important note.
IMPORTANT There is a limit to the amount of current the input diode of the drive opto-coupler can withstand. If this current is exceeded, the device will be destroyed. The SMCM is capable of sinking considerably more current than the 15 mA specified. Most drives having opto-coupler inputs have a series current-limit resistor sized properly for a +5V external supply. If the drive being used has an opto-coupler input but does not have a current-limit resistor or if the current-limit resistor is too small, then one will have to be added externally. Consult your drive manual for information regarding this topic. Following the wiring guidelines listed below will increase the reliability of the SMCM/drive system.
1. 2. 3.
Route the wiring from the SMCM separately from any high current or electrically noisy wiring. Keep the wires connecting the SMCM to the drive less than 10 feet in length. Shield the wiring from the SMCM. Tie shields to the SMCM shield terminal screw and leave the other end of the shield unconnected.
D.6 -5
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Opto-Coupler Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. 2. 3. 4.
Step + Step Direction + Direction -
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D6-4:
SMCM External Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step to Direction to Step + and Direction + to N/C
Figure D6-4. SMCM Connections to Opto-Coupler Drive Inputs
+5VDC External Supply +V 0V
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
SPG
Step +
Drive with opto-coupler inputs
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
220 Ohm Step Opto isolator
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
3
Dir + 220 Ohm
CH 1 +V COMMON
5
Dir -
Opto isolator
7
SHIELD
9
D.6 -6
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Opto-Coupler with Common Source Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. 2. 3.
Opto power input Step Direction
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D6-5:
SMCM External Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step to Direction to Opto power input to N/C
Figure D6-5. SMCM Connections to Opto-Coupler Drive Inputs with Common Source
+15V DC External Supply +V 0V
Drive with opto-coupler (common source) inputs
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
SPG 1
CH 1 STEP/CW
Opto power 220 Ohm Step
Opto isolator
680 Ohm 680 Ohm Dir
CH 1 +V COMMON
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
220 Ohm Opto isolator
5 7
SHIELD
9 External Resistors
D.6 -7
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Single-Ended Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. 2. 3.
Step Direction Signal ground
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D6-6:
SMCM Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step to Direction to N/C to Signal ground
Figure D6-6. SMCM Connections to Single-Ended Drive Inputs
+5 VDC External Supply +V 0V
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
Drive with single-ended inputs
+5V 1K
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
Step
+5V 1K
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
Dir
7
SHIELD
Signal ground
9
AA859-2491
If the pull-up resistors internal to the drive are inadequate, you may need to add external pull-up resistors. Install them as close as possible to the drive.
D.6 -8
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Differential Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. Step + 2. Step 3. Direction + 4. Direction 5. Signal ground
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D6-7:
SMCM Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/ CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step + to Direction + to N/C to Signal ground
Figure D6-7. SMCM Connections to Differential Drive Inputs
+5VDC External Supply +V 0V
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
Drive with differential inputs
+5V +5V
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
Step + Step Dir + Dir +5V
+ + -
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
7
SHIELD
Signal ground
9
AA860-2491
If the Step- and Direction- inputs are not biased to one half the external supply by the drive, external voltage dividers will be required. Install them as close to the drive as possible.
D.6 -9
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Theory of Operation
The stepper module is part of an open loop control system used to position from one to eight axes. The diagram in Figure D6-8 illustrates one axis being controlled by the SMCM. Digital signals from the SMCM are converted into fixed increments of motion via the stepper drive. This allows the stepper motor to move the load accurately and reliably by following the number of input steps.
Figure D6-8. Open Loop Stepper System
PIC900
CPU
Data Transfer
SMCM Stepper Drive Stepper Motor L o a d
AA861-2491
The SMCM controls the position, velocity, and acceleration of the stepper motor. The number of pulses generated by the SMCM provides distance information (steps) and the rate of these pulses provides velocity information (steps/sec). The rate of change of the pulse rate provides acceleration/deceleration information (steps/sec/sec). Commands (acc/dec rates, maximum velocity, reference position, distance, position, and velocity moves) and control data (E-stop, C-stop, start, pause, continue, modes) are sent to the module and status and position information are received from the module via software. Each channel can have up to 500 commands queued up on the module. The step rate programmed by you for a velocity command (or calculated by the SMCM during acceleration or deceleration) versus the actual rate output from the SMCM is defined by the following equation: 10 x 10 6 ActualRate = -------------------X 10 x 10 6 where X is the integer quotient of ---------------------------------------------ProgrammedRate Refer to the Software Manual for information on controlling the SMCM via software.
D.6 -10
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Output stepper module (2, 4, 8 ch) specifications
Function Part number
Controls up to eight stepper drives 502-03677-02 502-03677-22 502-03677-42 8 channel 2 channel 4 channel
+V input (from external supply) Step/CW output rating Direction/CCW output rating Field side connector Protection of logic circuits Indicator light, module Position range Step rate Step rate accuracy
4.5 VDC to 20 VDC, 45 mA per connected channel Totem pole, 15 mA sink, 5 mA source 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals Optical isolation between the logic and field side A DIAG LED turns OFF when the module passes its diagnostic tests at power-on 2,147,352,575 steps 0 to 1,000,000 steps/sec 10 x 10 6 ActualRate = -------------------X where X is the integer quotient of 10 x 10 6 ---------------------------------------------ProgrammedRate 1 to 16,777,215 steps/sec/sec 2,147,352,575 steps Pulse output halted 8 channel 4 channel 2 channel
Acceleration/deceleration rate Reference range Response to scan loss
Logic side power requirements (typi- 404 mA @ +5V cal) 239 mA @ +5V 156 mA @ +5V Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
6 mA per active channel @ +5V 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
D.6 -11
Output Stepper Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
D.6 -12
D.7 -
Slider Driver Module
Introduction
The Slider Driver module is an interface between the PiC Resolver module and up to two independent Inductosyn systems. For each Inductosyn system, the Slider Driver module accepts two sinusoidal signals from the Resolver module and applies them to the slider of the Inductosyn system. The Slider Driver module then accepts feedback from the scale amplifier of the Inductosyn system, conditions the signal and passes this information to the Resolver module. The Resolver module uses the feedback signal to determine position information. Refer to the Input Resolver Module for additional information.
Figure D7-1. Slider Driver Module
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
D.7 -1
Slider Driver Module
Connections
All signals to this module must come to the screw terminal connector through shielded twisted pair wires. These wires must be protected against electrical noise. See the discussion in the Hardware chapter on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines". Three signal pairs connect the module to the PiC Resolver module. Each signal pair has two screw terminal connections. The signals are: RPO from resolver module QPO from resolver module FDBK to resolver module Three signal pairs connect the module to each Inductosyn system. Two signal pairs are connected to the slider and one signal pair is connected to the output of the scale amplifier. Each signal pair has two screw terminal connections. The signals are: RPO to slider QPO to slider SFDBK from scale amplifier Two connections are required for an external +24VDC power supply. In addition the module has 12 screw connections for terminating the shields. All twelve are connected inside the module so they are the same point electrically. They are also internally connected to the common pins 4 and 6. Connect pin 4 or 6 to the Single Point Ground (SPG) to which the system rack is connected. The slider and scale amplifier have ground connection points also. Connect these points to the Single Point Ground (SPG) to which the system rack is connected.
D.7 -2
Slider Driver Module
Figure D7-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS DC COMMON 1 +12V DC OUT COMMON COMMON RPO From Resolver Module QPO From Resolver Module SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD 3 -12V DC OUT 5 RPO From Resolver Module 7 QPO From Resolver Module 9 RPO To Slider 1 11 RPO From Slider 1 13 RPO To Slider 2 15 RPO From Slider 2 17 QPO To Slider 1 19 QPO From Slider 1 21 QPO To Slider 2 23 QPO From Slider 2 25 SFDBK From Scale Amp1 27 SFDBK From Scale Amp1 29 SFDBK From Scale Amp 2 SHIELD SHIELD FDBK1 To Resolver Module FDBK2 To Resolver Module 31 SFDBK From Scale Amp 2 33 35 FDBK1 To Resolver Module FDBK2 To Resover Module CONNECTIONS +24V DC IN
37 39 (Not Used)
(Not Used)
D.7 -3
Slider Driver Module
Figure D7-3 illustrates the connections between the PiC Resolver Module, the Slider Driver Module, and a single Inductosyn system. Note that RPO2 pins 15 and 17 are jumpered and QPO2 pins 23 and 25 are jumpered when only one Inductosyn system is connected.
Figure D7-3. Connections to a Single Inductosyn System Slider Driver Module
+24V DC IN
Resolver Module
FDBK1 FDBK1
24V DC +V Power Supply 0V
DC COMMON To SPG
1
+12V DC OUT
3
-12V DC OUT
1 5 3
RPO
SHIELD
RPO RPO QPO QPO
5
QPO QPO
RPO 1 11 RPO 1 13 25
SHIELDS
SHIELD RPO 2
15 RPO 2 17 QPO 1 19 QPO 1 21 QPO 2 23 QPO 2 25 SFDBK1 27 SFDBK1 29 SHIELD
To SPG To SPG
27 29
31
33 FDBK1 FDBK1 35 37 39 (Not Used) (Not Used)
D.7 -4
Scale Amp
-V +V FB FB
9
Slider 1
Scale
RPO
7
Slider Driver Module
Figure D7-4 illustrates the connections between the PiC Resolver Module, the Slider Driver Module, and two Inductosyn systems.
Figure D7-4. Connections to Two Inductosyn Systems Slider Driver Module
+24V DC IN
Resolver Module
FDBK1 FDBK1
24V DC +V Power Supply 0V
DC COMMON To SPG
1
+12V DC OUT
3
-12V DC OUT
1 5 3
RPO
SHIELD
RPO RPO QPO QPO FDBK2 FDBK2
Slider 1
5
QPO QPO
7
RPO 1 11 RPO 1 13 SHIELD RPO 2 15 RPO 2
25
SHIELDS
To SPG To SPG
27
Slider 2
17 19
QPO 1 21 SHIELD QPO 2 23 25 27 SFDBK1 29 SHIELD SFDBK2 31 SFDBK2 33 FDBK1 FDBK1 35 FDBK2 37 FDBK2 39 (Not Used) (Not Used) SHIELD QPO 2 SHIELD SFDBK1
To SPG
To SPG
Scale Amp
-V +V FB FB
QPO 1
Scale
SHIELD
Scale Amp
-V +V FB FB
9
Scale
RPO
7
D.7 -5
Slider Driver Module
Theory of Operation
An Inductosyn system is a linear transducer consisting of printed circuit patterns along two flat bars. One of these bars is called the scale, the other is the slider. The scale is permanently attached along an axis of interest. The slider is attached to part of a machine that moves along the axis of interest. When the machine moves, the slider passes over the scale. The slider and the scale are separated by an air gap. Alternating current passing through the slider creates a field which induces a signal in the scale. Position information is determined by the phase relationship between these signals. The PiC Resolver module does not have the capability to drive a slider directly. The Slider Driver module provides the necessary current drive requirements. This module takes RPO and QPO from the Resolver module and applies them to the slider. The output of the scale is quite small and requires amplification. The Slider Driver module accepts the output of the scale amplifier and passes this signal back to the Resolver module, where the position information is determined. The Slider Driver module obtains all of its power from an external +24VDC supply. Output voltages of 12VDC are available to power the scale amplifier.
D.7 -6
Slider Driver Module
Specification Table
Characteristic
Slider Driver Module Specifications
Function Part number Field side connector External Supply Input Voltage range Nominal input Input current (max) Output Voltages Scale Amplifier
Drives up to two Inductosyn sliders 502-03956-02 40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals
+18 to 30 VDC +24VDC 1Amp 12VDC current limited 503-13704-00 NOTE: If the Inductosyn scales and sliders are purchased from Giddings & Lewis, this is the required scale amplifier. 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/31/EEC, 93/ 68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
D.7 -7
Slider Driver Module
Physical size
1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
Vibration (per IEC 68-2- 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 6) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
D.7 -8
Slider Driver Module
NOTES
D.7 -9
Slider Driver Module
D.7 -10
D.8 -
SERCOS Module
Introduction
The SERCOS module is an interface between the PiC and one or two fiber optic rings. A ring can have from one to eight SERCOS slaves. The module contains an on board processor. Five LEDs provide diagnostic information and transmit and receive status for the SERCOS rings. There are one or two SERCOS ring ports located at the bottom of the module. Each ring port has a receive and a transmit fiber optic connector. There is also an RS232 port used for loading FLASH memory updates.
Figure D8-1. SERCOS Module with Two Ring Ports
SERCOS
Name of module Diagnostic LED
Ring1
Ring 2
XMT REC XMT REC
SERCOS LEDs
RS232 port 9-pin D
Bottom View of Ring Ports
R2
R1
T2
T1
Key SERCOS Ring Ports Fiber Optic Connections on bottom (see inset)
T = Transmit R = Receive
Ring 2
Ring 1
D.8 -1
SERCOS Module
Connections
SERCOS Ports
The SERCOS ports located on the bottom of the module can connect to one or two SERCOS rings. The connection to each ring is made through a pair of female fiber optic SMA connectors. The module's transmitter is connected to the first receiver in the loop and the module's receiver is connected to the last transmitter in the loop.
Figure D8-2. SERCOS Connections - One Ring
PiC
CSM CPU SERC
PC connected to RS232 port for Field Updates of Giddings & Lewis system software Position, Velocity, or Torque Commands
TR Feedback and Diagnostics
Fiber Optic Ring
RT SERCOS Slave 1
R SERCOS Slave 2
T (Up to eight SERCOS slaves)
RT SERCOS Slave n
Serial Port
There is an RS232 serial port on the front of the module. This is used to connect to a PC in order to do a field update of the FLASH memory on the processor. The pinout is shown below.
Figure D8-3. Pinout for the 9-Pin D Connector
Pin #
Signal Name
In/Out
2 3 5
Receive Data Transmit Data Ground
In Out In/Out
D.8 -2
SERCOS Module
Theory of Operation
The SERCOS module is controlled by your LDO created in PiCPro. An on-board processor interprets the functions and performs appropriate operations according to the SERCOS communications protocol. The data transfer rate is 2M Baud with user-defined update rate. If a scan loss occurs, SERCOS communications are reset. There is no communication with the SERCOS slaves until you reinitialize.
D.8 -3
SERCOS Module
Specification Table
Characteristic
SERCOS Module Specifications
Function Part number SERCOS port Update port
Interfaces with up to two rings with from one to eight digital drives Two-Ring Module 502-03944-04 One-Ring Module 502-03944-14
SMA female connectors for interfacing to 1000 meter plastic fiber optic cable with SMA male connectors RS232 interface Fiber optic receiver specifications: Peak input power (optical level low) Peak input power (optical level high Fiber optic transmitter specifications: Peak output power (optical level high) -10.5 dBm min, -5.5 dBm max -31.2 dBm max -20.0 dBm min, -5 .0 dBm max
Logic side power requirements Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
575 mA @ 5V 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
D.8 -4
SERCOS Module
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/31/EEC, 93/ 68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
D.8 -5
SERCOS Module
Specification Table for the Fiber Optic Cable
Characteristics
Fiber optic cable specifications
Function Type Core diameter Fiber diameter Operating temperature Minimum bend radius Tensile strength Connectors Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
For use with SERCOS rings with segments from 0 to 30 meters (98 feet) Plastic with step index profile 980 m 60 m 1000 m 60 m 0 C to 55 C (32 F to 131 F) One time: Continuous: One time: Continuous: 30 mm 80 mm 250 N 100 N
SMA style which accommodates 1000 m size cable 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
D.8 -6
D.9 -
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Introduction
The output stepper axis module (SAM) can control up to eight stepper drives. The maximum step rate is ten million steps per second. An external power supply (4.75 VDC to 5.25 VDC) is required for operation. Commands and control data are sent to the module, and status information is received from the module, via the motion.lib software in PiCServoPro. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure D9-1. OUTPUT STEPPER Axis Module (2, 4, 8 ch)
OUTPUTSTEPPER
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA854-2491
D.9 -1
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Connections
A screw terminal connection is provided for each output and for the external power supply connection. (See Figure D9-2.) The outputs are optically isolated. (See Figure D9-3.) The external DC supply that powers the output signals should have a wire connected from its 0V (COMMON) terminal directly to the rack's single point ground. The power disconnect switch should be the same one used for the Central Service Module. In the power distribution diagrams in the Hardware chapter, a DC supply was set up according to these guidelines. The external DC supply can be provided by any combination of the following:
* *
The stepper drive
An external DC supply daisy-chained to several channels * Separate external DC supplies for individual channels
D.9 -2
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Figure D9-2. Screw terminal connection assignments
CONNECTIONS
SCREW TERMINALS
CONNECTIONS
CH 1 +V INPUT
CH 2 +V INPUT
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
CH2 STEP/CW
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 2
CH 2 DIRECTION/CCW
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
Channel 1
CH 2 +V COMMON
7
SHIELD
SHIELD
9
CH 3 +V INPUT
CH 4 +V INPUT
11
CH 3 STEP/CW
CH 4 STEP/CW
13
CH 3 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 4
CH 4 DIRECTION/CCW
15
CH 3 +V COMMON
Channel 3
CH 4 +V COMMON
17
SHIELD
SHIELD
19
CH 5 +V INPUT
CH 6 +V INPUT
21
CH 5 STEP/CW
CH 6 STEP/CW
23
CH 5 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 6
CH 6 DIRECTION/CCW
25
CH 5 +V COMMON
Channel 5
CH 6 +V COMMON
27
SHIELD
SHIELD
29
CH 7 +V INPUT
CH 8 +V INPUT
31
CH 7 STEP/CW
CH 8 STEP/CW
33
CH 7 DIRECTION/CCW
Channel 8
CH 8 DIRECTION/CCW
35
CH 7 +V COMMON
Channel 7
CH 8 +V COMMON
37
SHIELD
SHIELD
39
AA855-2491
D.9 -3
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Connections for one channel are illustrated on the right in Figure D9-3. +V input Step/cw output Direction/ccw output Common to the +V terminal of the external power supply to the step or clockwise input of the drive to direction or counterclockwise input of the drive to the 0V terminal of the external power supply NOTE: When the drive inputs are optically isolated, tie the 0V of the external power supply to SPG. All shield pins on the module are connected to each other internally and AC coupled to SPG.
Figure D9-3. Connections for One Channel
Shield
Stepper Module
+5VDC External Supply +V 0V
CH 1 STEP/CW
Internal Circuitry Connections
CH 1 +V INPUT
1 3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
SPG
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
7
SHIELD
9
SPG
D.9 -4
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Connecting the SAM to Stepper Drives
Consult your drive manual regarding the proper connection of an indexer such as the SAM. Four types of drive inputs and the proper connection techniques are shown in Figures D9-4 to D9-7. When working with opto-coupler drive inputs, be sure the input diode is protected by a current-limiting resistor as stated in the following important note.
IMPORTANT There is a limit to the amount of current the input diode of the drive opto-coupler can withstand. If this current is exceeded, the device will be destroyed. The SAM is capable of sinking considerably more current than the 15 mA specified. Most drives having opto-coupler inputs have a series current-limit resistor sized properly for a +5V external supply. If the drive being used has an opto-coupler input but does not have a current-limit resistor or if the current-limit resistor is too small, then one will have to be added externally. Consult your drive manual for information regarding this topic. Following the wiring guidelines listed below will increase the reliability of the SAM/drive system.
1. 2. 3.
Route the wiring from the SAM separately from any high current or electrically noisy wiring. Keep the wires connecting the SAM to the drive less than 10 feet in length. Shield the wiring from the SAM. Tie shields to the SAM shield terminal screw and leave the other end of the shield unconnected.
D.9 -5
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Opto-Coupler Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. 2. 3. 4.
Step + Step Direction + Direction -
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D9-4:
SAM External Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step to Direction to Step + and Direction + to N/C
Figure D9-4. SAM Connections to Opto-Coupler Drive Inputs
+5VDC External Supply +V 0V
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
SPG
Step +
Drive with opto-coupler inputs
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
220 Ohm Step Opto isolator
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
3
Dir + 220 Ohm
CH 1 +V COMMON
5
Dir -
Opto isolator
7
SHIELD
9
D.9 -6
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Opto-Coupler with Common Source Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. 2. 3.
Opto power input Step Direction
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D9-5:
SAM External Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step to Direction to Opto power input to N/C
Figure D9-5. SAM Connections to Opto-Coupler Drive Inputs with Common Source
+5V DC External Supply +V 0V
Drive with opto-coupler (common source) inputs
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
SPG 1
CH 1 STEP/CW
Opto power 220 Ohm Step 220 Ohm Dir
Opto isolator
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
Opto isolator
7
SHIELD
9
D.9 -7
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Single-Ended Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. 2. 3.
Step Direction Signal ground
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D9-6:
SAM Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step to Direction to N/C to Signal ground
Figure D9-6. SAM Connections to Single-Ended Drive Inputs
+5 VDC External Supply +V 0V
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
Drive with single-ended inputs
+5V 1K
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
Step
+5V 1K
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
Dir
7
SHIELD
Signal ground
9
AA859-2491
If the pull-up resistors internal to the drive are inadequate, you may need to add external pull-up resistors. Install them as close as possible to the drive.
D.9 -8
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Differential Drive Inputs
The inputs for this type of drive will be:
1. Step + 2. Step 3. Direction + 4. Direction 5. Signal ground
Make the following connections as illustrated in Figure D9-7:
SAM Power Supply Drive
Step/CW Direction/ CCW +V Input +V Common
to to to to
N/C N/C +V 0V
to Step + to Direction + to N/C to Signal ground
Figure D9-7. SAM Connections to Differential Drive Inputs
+5VDC External Supply +V 0V
Stepper Module
CH 1 +V INPUT
Drive with differential inputs
+5V +5V
1
CH 1 STEP/CW
Step + Step Dir + Dir +5V
+ + -
3
CH 1 DIRECTION/CCW
5
CH 1 +V COMMON
7
SHIELD
Signal ground
9
AA860-2491
If the Step- and Direction- inputs are not biased to one half the external supply by the drive, external voltage dividers will be required. Install them as close to the drive as possible.
D.9 -9
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Theory of Operation
The stepper module is part of an open loop control system used to position from one to eight axes. The diagram in Figure D9-8 illustrates one axis being controlled by the SAM. Digital signals from the SAM are converted into fixed increments of motion via the stepper drive. This allows the stepper motor to move the load accurately and reliably by following the number of input steps.
Figure D9-8. Open Loop Stepper System PIC900
CPU
Data Transfer
SAM Stepper Drive Stepper Motor L o a d
The CPU, through the SAM controls the position, velocity, and acceleration of the stepper motor. The number of pulses generated by the SAM provides distance information (steps) and the rate of these pulses provides velocity information (steps/sec). The rate of change of the pulse rate provides acceleration/deceleration information (steps/sec/sec). For safety reasons, the SAM stops outputting pulses to the stepper drive when a scan loss occurs. Valid step rates sent by the CPU for a velocity command (or calculated by the CPU during acceleration or deceleration) are defined by the following equation: 10 x 10 6 ValidRate = -------------------X where X is any integer from 1 to 8,388,609. Refer to the Software Manual for information on controlling the SAM via software.
D.9 -10
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Output stepper module (2, 4, 8 ch) specifications
Function Part number
Controls up to eight stepper drives 502-04077-00 502-04077-20 502-04077-40 8 channel 2 channel 4 channel
+V input (from external supply) Step/CW output rating Direction/CCW output rating Field side connector Protection of logic circuits Indicator light, module Step rate Step rate accuracy
4.75 VDC to 5.25 VDC, 45 mA per connected channel Totem pole, 15 mA sink, 5 mA source 40-pin card edge connector, screw terminals Optical isolation between the logic and field side A DIAG LED turns OFF when the module passes its diagnostic tests at power-on 0 to 10,000,000 steps/sec 10 x 10 6 ValidRate = -------------------X where X is any integer from 1 to 8,388,609 Pulse output halted 8 channel 4 channel 2 channel
Response to scan loss
Logic side power requirements (typi- 140 mA cal) 80 mA 50 mA Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
D.9 -11
Output Stepper Axis Module (2, 4, or 8 channel)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
D.9 -12
Appendix E - Analog Modules
E.1 -
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
Introduction
The analog input module is designed to interface the PiC with voltage or current output devices to monitor such things as pressure, flow, speed, position, or temperature. There are two versions of the analog input module available. One has 12bit resolution and the other has 14-bit resolution. The module has eight independent analog conversion channels. Each channel converts a unipolar or bipolar analog input voltage or current into a 12- or 14- bit digital value. This data is transmitted to the PiCs CPU for processing. There is an internal current sense resistor for each channel for use with 0 to 20 mA or 4 to 20 mA devices. This module contains no user adjustable potentiometers or hardware switches. All necessary gain adjustments are done in software. The analog module can be configured as a feedback module using the Servosetup software. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure E1-9. INPUT ANALOG Module (8 CH)
INPUT ANALOG
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA60-3290
E.1 -1
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
Connections
All signals to the input module must come to the screw terminal connectors through shielded twisted pair wires. See the discussion in the Hardware chapter on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines". Each input channel has three connection pins. (See Figure E1-2.) The signals are: +voltage input -voltage input 250 ohm current sense resistor for 0/20 mA and 4/20 mA applications There are five common connection pins. All five pins are interconnected within the module so that they are the same point electrically. These pins are internally connected to the Single Point Ground (SPG). In addition the module has nine screw connections for terminating the shields. All nine are interconnected within the module so they are the same point electrically. These pins are internally connected to SPG. The shield at the device end of the cable is not connected.
E.1 -2
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
Figure E1-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module.
Figure E1-10. Connections for the Input Terminals
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS
2
Ch 2 +
1 3
Ch 1 + Ch 1 Ch 1 250 ohm Resistor Ch 3 +
4 Channel 2
Ch 2 -
Channel 1
6
Ch 2 250 ohm Resistor
5 7 9
8
Ch 4 +
10 Channel 4
Ch 4 -
Ch 3 Ch 3 250 ohm Resistor Ch 5 + Ch 5 Ch 5 250 ohm Resistor Ch7 + Ch 7 Ch 7 250 ohm Resistor
Channel 3
12
Ch 4 250 ohm Resistor
11 13 15 17
14
Ch 6 +
16 Channel 6
Ch 6 Ch 6 250 ohm Resistor Ch 8 +
Channel 5
18 20 22 19 21 23 25 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 27 29 31 33 35
Channel 7
Channel 8
Ch 8 -
24
Ch 8 250 ohm Resistor Not used Not used Common Common Common Common Common Shield Shield Shield Shield Shield Shield Shield Shield Shield
Common Pins 27 to 31 (No external connection)
Shield Pins 32 to 40 37 39
E.1 -3
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
When connecting an analog voltage output device to the module, the positive wire of the twisted pair goes to the + screw terminal and the negative wire goes to the - screw terminal. Figure E1-3 illustrates these connections for channel one. Notice that no connection is made to the screw terminal with the internal 250 resistor when connecting a voltage source device.
Figure E1-11. Voltage Input Connections
1 3 5
Ch 1 + Ch 1 -
+ Voltage signal source
Ch 1 250 ohm Resistor
30 31 32
Shield Common
33 34 35 36
Shield
Shield Shield
Shield
37 38
Shield
Shield Shield
39 40
Shield
To SPG
E.1 -4
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
When using a 0 to 20 mA or 4 to 20 mA current output device, the positive wire of the twisted pair is connected to the + input and the negative wire is connected to the 250 resistor input. A jumper is placed between the - input and the 250 resistor input as shown in Figure E1-4 (from pin 3 to pin 5 for channel 1). This connects a 250 internal resistor across the input.
Figure E1-12. Current Input Connections (0 to 20 or 4 to 20 mA)
1 3 5
Ch 1 + Ch 1 -
+ -
Current signal source
0 to 20 or 4 to 20 mA
+ Power - supply
Ch 1 250 ohm Resistor
Common
30 31 32
Common
Shield
33 34
Shield
Shield
35 36
Shield
Shield
37 38
Shield
Shield Shield
39 40
Shield
To SPG
E.1 -5
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
An alternative method of connecting a two wire 4 to 20 mA current device is shown in Figure E1-5. Place a jumper between the - input and the 250 resistor input.
Figure E1-13. Current Input Connections (4 to 20 mA)
Current Signal Source 4-20 mA
+Input from power supply Output
1 3 5
Ch 1+ Ch 1Ch 1 250 ohm Resistor
+ Power - Supply
Common
30 32 31 Common 33 Shield 35 Shield 37 39
Shield Shield
Shield
34
Shield
36
Shield
38
Shield Shield
40
To SPG
Figure E1-6 illustrates an example of wiring an external potentiometer to the module using twisted pair wire. For this example, set up the channel initialization function (A_INCHIT) in software for 5 V unipolar with a filter of 100 ms.
E.1 -6
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
The 5 V power supply output voltage adjustment can be set for the maximum potentiometer output value. For example, the supply could be adjusted until the VALU output of the analog input channel read function (A_INCHRD) reads 4095 (12-bit) or 16383 (14-bit) with the pot at its maximum position.
Figure E1-14. Adding an External Potentiometer
1K to 50K Pot
1 3 5
Ch 1 + Ch 1 -
+ Adjustable
Regulated
5Volt
- Power supply
Ch 1 250 ohm Resistor
Common
30 31 32
Common
Shield
33 34
Shield
Shield
35 36
Shield
Shield
37 38
Shield
Shield Shield
39 40
Shield
To SPG
Theory of Operation
A 12- or 14- bit A/D converter samples each channel in sequence at the input scan rate. These values are stored in memory on the module so that any channel value can be read while the A/D converter is processing another channel sample. Each channel can be set up for a maximum input sensitivity of .125 V to 10 V, bipolar or unipolar, or for 4 to 20 mA or 0 to 20 mA current input. To sense current the internal 250 resistor must be connected as shown in Figures E1-4 or E15. All inputs are differential with the input signals electrically isolated from the logic side and filtered for a high degree of noise immunity. The default noise filter time constant is 1 ms. If more noise filtering is required, two longer time constants, 10 ms and 100 ms, are software selectable. The longer time constants will improve noise immunity but lengthen signal response time. Using the longer time constants may reduce closed position loop performance if the input is used for position feedback.
E.1 -7
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Input Analog (8 ch) module specification
Function Part number Field side connector Input channels Resolution Input sensitivity (software selectable)
Voltage ranges
Converts an analog input signal into a 12- or 14-bit digital word for each of eight channels. 12-bit 502-03642-03 14-bit 502-04050-00
40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 8 12 bits, or 4096 steps over the full input range 14 bits, or 16384 steps over the full input range
Unipolar 0 to 10 V 0 to 5V 0 to 2.5 V 0 to 1.25 V 0 to 1V 0 to .5 V 0 to .25 V 0 to .125 V
Bipolar 10 V 5 V 2.5 V 1.25V 1 V .5 V .25 V .125 V
Current range
0 to 20 mA, 4 to 20 mA
Common mode maximum voltage 40V (The maximum voltage that can safely be applied between either input terminal and circuit common.) Common mode operating voltage (The maximum voltage that can be applied between either input terminal and circuit common with inputs still operating properly.) Internal current sense resistor 11V
250 ohms
Maximum current sense resistor power .12 W Differential input resistance (each input to ground) Filter time constant - software selection 1 M Ohms 1 ms, 10 ms, 100 ms
E.1 -8
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
Accuracy of 4-20 mA range
12-bit - .2% of FSR at 25oC 14-bit - .15% of FSR at 25oC 100 PPM /oC 12-bit - .5% of FSR at 25oC 14-bit - .2% of FSR at 25oC 100 PPM /oC 12-bit-from 2 counts @ 10V to 8 counts @ .125V 14-bit-from 5 counts @ 10V to 40 counts @ .125V 120 mA @ +5V 112 mA @ +15V DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
Accuracy of all other ranges
0 Offset
Logic side power requirements (typical) Indicator light, module Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
E.1 -9
Input Analog Module (8 channel)
Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
E.1 -10
E.2 -
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
Introduction
The input temp J-K thermocouple modules (one for use with grounded thermocouples and one for use with ungrounded thermocouples) has 12 independent thermocouple or analog conversion channels which receive signals from J or K type thermocouples or from a voltage source. Each channel converts an analog signal into a 12-bit digital word which is processed by the PIC900. This module requires no hardware adjustments. All adjustments such as Fahrenheit or Celsius scaling and thermocouple ranges are software selectable. The DIAG LED turns on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure E2-1. INPUT TEMP J-K Module (12 CH)
INPUT TEMP J-K
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA82-0391
E.2 -1
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
Connections
Thermocouple signal levels are very small (1C is approximately 50 V) and, consequently, sensitive to electrical noise. The module inputs are processed to reduce noise sensitivity. Always follow procedures to eliminate electrical noise from the system. Some guidelines for reducing noise are listed below. Route thermocouple wires separately from sources of noise such as motors, AC wiring, etc. * Keep both wires of the thermocouple physically close. * If the point being measured is a noisy source, use shielded wire and electrically isolate the thermocouple junction from the point of measurement. * Use shielded thermocouple wire in severe noise environments.
*
For 100 mV input signals, do the following to protect from noise: Use shielded twisted pair wire. * Connect the shield to the cabinet or to the metal enclosure at the cable entrance. Figure E2-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module.
*
E.2 -2
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
Figure E2-2. Connection for Input Terminals
CONNECTION S
Ch 2 +
SCREW TERMINALS 1 3
CONNECTION S
Ch 1 +
2 4 6
Channel 1
Ch 1 Ch 3 +
Channel 2
Ch 2 -
5 7 9
Ch 4 +
Channel 3
Ch 3 Ch 5 + Ch 5 -
Channel 4
Ch 4 -
8 10
Ch 6 +
Channel 6
Ch 6 -
12 14 16 18 20 22
11 13 15 17
Channel 5
Ch 7 + Ch 7 -
Ch 8 +
Channel 7
Channel 8
Ch 8 Ch 10 +
Ch 9 +
Channel 10
19 21 23 25
Channel 9
Ch 9 Ch 11 +
Ch 10 -
Ch 12 +
Channel 11
24
Ch 11 Common (No external connection)
Channel 12
Ch 12 -
E.2 -3
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
When connecting thermocouples to the module, the white wire of J type (the yellow wire of K type) is connected to the + input and the red wire of J or K type is connected to the - input as shown on the left in Figure E2-3. On the right is a shielded thermocouple connection.
Figure E2-3. Thermocouple Connections
Thermocouple connections to Channel 1
White (J), Yellow (K) +
Thermocouple connections with shield
White (J), Yellow (K) +
1 3
Ch 1 + Ch 1 -
1 3
Ch 1 + Ch 1 -
Red (J or K)
5
Red (J or K) To metal enclosure at cable entrance
When making an analog input connection to a 100 mV type signal, shielded twisted pair wire should be used with the shield connected to SPG close to the module as shown in Figure E2-4.
Figure E2-4. Analog Input Connections
1 3
Ch 1 +
+
Ch 1 -
To metal enclosure at cable entrance
Voltage signal source
To SPG
E.2 -4
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
If the 100 mV range will be exceeded, external resistors must be added. The resistors should be positioned as close to the PIC900 as possible. NOTE: Units are Vin in volts and R1 and R2 in K s. Select a R1 value from .5K to 2K . Use the following formula to calculate the R 1 x 260 value of R2: R 2 = ( V in x 10 ) -------------------- R 1 + 260 For example, if the input range will be 10 V and R1 = 1K , then the value of R2 1 x 260 would be: R 2 = ( 10V x 10 ) ----------------- 1 + 260 R 2 = 99.6K A 100K resistor could be used for R2 in this example. It is the closest standard 1% value.
Figure E2-5. Analog Input Connections with External Resistors
R2
1 3
Ch 1 + Ch 1 -
R1
+ Voltage To metal enclosure at cable entrance signal source
To SPG
E.2 -5
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
Theory of Operation
The input thermocouple module receives analog signals from thermocouples or analog inputs and converts them to a 12 bit digital word for each channel in use. Each channel can be set up individually for three different thermocouple input ranges (see specification table) or for 100 mV. The module provides cold junction compensation. Cold junction compensation corrects for error voltages which occur at the point where the thermocouple wire terminates into the PIC900 module connector. Always make the connection into the module with the thermocouple wire to ensure that cold junction compensation is effective. All inputs are differential with input signals electrically isolated from the logic side. The inputs are filtered with a 120 ms time constant for a higher degree of noise immunity. The 100 mV input can be used only in applications which do not require a response time faster than 120 ms.
Thermocouple Precautions
Certain precautions should be taken when working with thermocouples to ensure the integrity of your system. Avoid any vibration, bending or other mechanical stress which may strain the thermocouple wire and change its characteristics. * Use 24 AWG solid or larger for runs less than 30 feet. Use 20 AWG or larger for runs greater than 30 feet. (The maximum thermocouple wire length is 1,000 feet.) * Use shielded wire to protect from severe electrical noise. * Use the thermocouple wire well within its temperature rating.
*
E.2 -6
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Thermocouple module specification
Function Part numbers Field side connector Input channels Resolution Input voltage sensitivity (software selectable) J type thermocouple temperature ranges (at 25C) K type thermocouple temperature ranges (at 25C) J or K type accuracy 100 mV accuracy Time between samples (software selectable) Filter time constant Cold junction compensation Open thermocouple detection
Measure J or K type thermocouple wire inputs or 100 mV analog inputs Ungrounded 502-03658-02 Grounded 502-03809-02
25-pin card edge connector, screw terminals 12 12 bits 100 mV -150C to 1200C (-238F to 2192 F) -35C to 620C (-31F to 1148 F) -10C to 280C (+14F to 536 F) -200C to 1300C (-328F to 2372 F) -80C to 820C (-112F to 1508 F) -35C to 415C (-31F to 779 F) J type .37% of the 1350C span K type .36% of the 1500C span
(50 V + 1 count + input x 1%)
5000 to 65,535 sec 120 ms 0 to 80C 1C at the sensor Indicated by software (No detection for grounded thermocouples) mA @ +5V mA @ +15V
Logic side power requirements (typi- 80 cal) 112 Indicator light, module UL and C/UL Listed Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
E.2 -7
Input J-K Thermocouple Module (12 channel)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
E.2 -8
E.3 -
Input RTD Module (6 channel)
Introduction
The input resistance temperature detector (RTD) module has 6 independent RTD conversion channels which receive signals from 50 or 100 RTDs. Each channel converts a resistance into a 12-bit digital word which is processed by the PIC900. This module requires no hardware adjustments. All adjustments such as Fahrenheit or Celsius scaling and temperature ranges are software selectable. The DIAG LED turns on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure E3-1. INPUT RTD Module (6 CH)
INPUT
RTD
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA881-2591
E.3 -1
Input RTD Module (6 channel)
Connections
RTD signal levels are very small (approximately 1.0 mA constant current source) and, consequently, sensitive to electrical noise. The module inputs are processed to reduce noise sensitivity. Always follow procedures to eliminate electrical noise from the system. Refer to the EMC Guidelines. Some additional guidelines for reducing noise are listed below. Route RTD wires separately from sources of noise such as motors, AC wiring, etc. * Keep RTD wires physically close to each other. * In severe noise environment, use twisted pair wire for two pin RTDs and use shielded wire (3 conductor w/ground recommended) for three pin RTDs.
*
Figure E3-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module.
E.3 -2
Input RTD Module (6 channel)
Figure E3-2. Connection for Input Terminals
SCREW TERMINALS 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 19 21 23 25 11 13 15 17 5 7 9 1 3
CONNECTIONS
Ch 1 Common Ch 1 Pin 3 Ch 1 Pin 2 Ch 1 Pin 1 Ch 2 Common Ch 2 Pin 3 Ch 2 Pin 2 Ch 2 Pin 1 Ch 3 Common Ch 3 Pin 3 Ch 3 Pin 2 Ch 3 Pin 1 Ch 4 Common Ch 4 Pin 3 Ch 4 Pin 2 Ch 4 Pin 1 Ch 5 Common Ch 5 Pin 3 Ch 5 Pin 2 Ch 5 Pin 1 Ch 6 Common Ch 6 Pin 3 Ch 6 Pin 2 Ch 6 Pin 1 Common (No external connection)
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Channel 4
Channel 5
Channel 6
RTDs may be 2- or 3-wire types. Inaccuracies in temperature will occur as the RTD wire (lead) length increases. Compensation for temperature inaccuracies must be taken into account when using RTDs. The RTD module provides internal lead compensation for 3-wire RTDs with lead lengths up to 1000 feet. No internal lead compensation is available for 2-wire RTDs. They are accurate without any lead compensation up to 20 feet. Adjustments for lead compensation can be made by you via the software for both 2- and 3-wire RTDs for up to 5000 feet of lead length. When connecting the 2-wire RTD to the module, the black wire and red wires may be connected to pins 1 and 2 for the channel. Pin 3 is connected to the channel common with a jumper. See Figure E3-3 below. NOTE: All the channel commons are connected internally to Pin 25 and to single point ground. No external connection to Pin 25 should be made.
E.3 -3
Input RTD Module (6 channel)
Figure E3-3. RTD (2-wire) Connections
RTD Module
1
Ch 1 Common
RTD (2 Wire)
Ch 1 Pin 3
3
Ch 1 Pin 1
Ch 1 Pin 2
Black
Red
When connecting a 3-wire RTD to the module, the red wire and the black wires are connected to pins 1, 2, and 3 for the channel.
Figure E3-4. RTD (3-wire) Connections
RTD (3 Wire)
Black Black
Ch 1 Pin 3
RTD Module
1 3
Ch 1 Common
Ch 1 Pin 2
Red
Ch 1 Pin 1
Theory of Operation
The input RTD module receives analog signals from 50 or 100 RTDs and converts them to a 12 bit digital word for each channel in use. Each channel can be set up individually for up to three different RTD input ranges. The three temperature ranges for RTDs are.
50 RTD 1 2 3 100 RTD
-200C to 350C (-328F to 1562F) -200C to 850C (-328F to 1562F) -200C to 266C (-328F to 510.8F) -200C to 266C (-328F to 510.8F) -200C to 0C (-328F to 32F)
E.3 -4
Input RTD Module (6 channel)
RTD Precautions
Certain precautions should be taken when working with RTDs to ensure the integrity of your system. Avoid any vibration, bending or other mechanical stress which may strain the RTD wire and change its characteristics. * Use 24 AWG solid or larger for runs less than 30 feet. Use 20 AWG or larger for runs greater than 30 feet. * Use shielded wire to protect from severe electrical noise. * Use the RTD wire well within its temperature rating.
* Specification Table
Characteristic
RTD module specification
Function Part number Field side connector Input channels Resolution RTD types 50 temperature ranges 100 temperature ranges
Measures 50 and 100 RTD inputs 502-03679-02 25-pin card edge connector, screw terminals 6 12 bits European curve (Alpha = .00385) for 50 and 100 two and three wire RTDs -200C to -200C to -200C to -200C to -200C to 850C 266C 850C 266C 0C (-328F to 1562 F) (-328F to 510.8 F) (-328F to 1562 F) (-328F to 510.8 F) (-328F to 32 F)
Maximum RTD lead wire length 24 AWG or smaller 20 AWG or larger < 20 feet 2-wire RTD - under 20 feet without lead compensation NOTE: Lead length can affect accuracy of 2-wire RTDs with lengths over 20 feet. 2-wire RTD - up to 5000 feet with lead compensation 3-wire RTD - up to 1000 feet without lead compensation 3-wire RTD - up to 5000 feet with lead compensation .6% FSR @ 25C Temperature coefficient of 75 PPM/C
Accuracy
E.3 -5
Input RTD Module (6 channel)
Time between samples (software selectable) Filter time constant Open RTD detection Logic side power requirements (typical) Indicator light, module Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
2000 to 65,535 sec 120 ms Indicated by software 80 mA @ +5V 112 mA @ +15V DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
E.3 -6
E.4 -
Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel)
Introduction
The output 10V DC module has independent D/A conversion channels. Each channel converts a 16-bit digital word into a differential type analog output signal. The full range of the output signal is - 11 V to + 11 V, with a resolution of 1 part in 65,536. It is available in the following configurations:
1. 2.
8 channel 10V DC module 4 channel 10V DC module
A typical use for this module is to supply the velocity command to a servo drive. This module contains no potentiometers or hardware switches. All necessary adjustments are done in software. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure E4-1. OUTPUT 10V DC Module
OUTPUT +10 VDC -
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA62-0190
E.4 -1
Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel)
Connections
Each analog output channel must be connected to a receiving device with shielded twisted pair wires. Figure E4-2 illustrates the 8 channel module. Only channels 1 through 4 are available on the 4 channel module. Because of the signal levels involved, these wires must be protected from electrical noise. Refer to the EMC Guidelines for information on how to protect these wires. Two screw terminal connections are assigned to each channel to carry the signals. In addition, the module has nine screw terminal connections for terminating the shields. All nine are connected together inside the module, so they are the same point electrically. They are internally connected to SPG and no external connection should be made.
Figure E4-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
RECEIVING DEVICE SCREW TERMINALS 1
CH2 CH2 CH2 CH2 CH1 CH1 CH1 CH1
RECEIVING DEVICE
3
5
CH4 CH4 CH4 CH4
CH3 CH3 CH3 CH3
7
9
CH6 CH6 CH6 CH6
CH5 CH5 CH5 CH5
11 13
CH7 CH7 CH7 CH7
CH8 CH8 CH8 CH8
15
17 19 21 23 SHIELD COMMONS
25
E.4 -2
Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel)
Analog Output Receiving Devices
In Figure E4-2 it was assumed that all the receiving device inputs were differential. However, you may connect the differential type output from this module to a single-ended input device. Figure E4-3 shows the difference between the two types of connections. Note that one wire in the twisted pair is connected to the 0 V terminal on the receiving device. This 0V terminal must be referenced to the SPG through the device's ground connection. It is recommended that the receiving device have a differential input for best noise immunity. See the discussion on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" in the Chapter 1 and the EMC Guidelines.
Figure E4-3. Differential and Single-Ended Receiving Devices
SCREW TERMINALS
CH1
RECEIVING DEVICES
1
CH1
CH1 CH1
Differential input
GND TO SPG
3 5 7
CH3 CH3 CH3 0V GND
Single-ended input device
TO SPG
9
TO SHIELD COMMONS
AA64-1890
Theory of Operation
The CPU module sends the output module a 16-bit digital word for each channel used. Each digital word is converted to a corresponding voltage within the range of 11 V. The voltage is buffered and brought out to a pair of screw terminal connections as a differential type voltage output. This output is less subject to interference from electrical noise than a single-ended output would be. You can adjust each channel in software for offset adjustments, gain scaling, and unipolar outputs. For safety reasons, all outputs are automatically reset to 0 V when a scan loss condition occurs.
E.4 -3
Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Output 10V DC module specification
Function Part number Field side connector Output channels Resolution Output voltage characteristics Nominal voltage range Voltage accuracy @ 11 V Output current, max. @ 10V Output update time increment Output voltage after power up Response to "scan loss" Output ripple Short circuit protection Indicator light, module Logic side power requirements (typical)
Converts a 16-bit digital word into a +/- 11 V analog signal for each of eight or four channels. 8 ch 4 ch 502-03518-03 502-03518-23
25 pin card edge connector, screw terminals 8 4 16 bits, or 65536 steps over the full output range
11 VDC 5% 10 mA 32 s 0 V 20 mV All outputs reset to 0 V 20 mV < 10 mVRMS at 30 KHz Current limited outputs DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests For 8 channel module; 43 mA @ +5V 11 mA @ +15V 6 mA @ -15V 2 mA per energized output @ +5V 12 mA per energized output @ +15V 12 mA per energized output @ -15V For 4 channel module; 37 mA 5 mA 3 mA @ +5V @ +15V @ -15V
1 mA per energized output @ +5V 11 mA per energized output @+15V
E.4 -4
Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel)
Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity CE Marked
7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
E.4 -5
Output 10V DC Module (8 or 4 channel)
NOTES
E.4 -6
E.5 -
Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel)
Introduction
The 4-20mA output module has six independent 4-20mA conversion channels. Each channel converts a 15-bit digital value into a single ended type 4-20mA analog current output signal. The full range of the output signal is 4mA to 20mA, with a 15-bit resolution of one part in 32,768. A typical use for this module is to supply a control signal to valves. This module contains no user adjusted potentiometers or hardware switches. All necessary adjustments are done in software. The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure E5-1. OUTPUT 4-20mA Module (6 CH)
OUTPUT 4-20mA
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Screw terminal connector
Door
AA1047-3991
E.5 -1
Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel)
Connections
Two screw terminal connections are assigned to each channel to carry the signals. (See Figure E5-2.) The negative outputs of each channel (CHn) are connected internally to the +V Common. In addition, the module has six screw terminal connections for terminating the shields. All six are connected internally, so they are the same point electrically. Two connections are used to connect an external power supply.
Figure E5-2. Screw Terminal Connector Assignments
SCREW TERMINALS CONNECTIONS 1 CH2 2 3 CH2 4 5 CH4 6 7 CH4 8 9 10 CH6 11 12 CH6 13 NOT USED 14 15 NOT USED 16 17 18 NOT USED 19 SHIELD 20 21 SHIELD SHIELD 22 23 24 25 (No external connection) SHIELD SHIELD SHIELD +V COMMON +V EXTERNAL NOT USED CH5 CH5 CH3 CH3 CH1 CONNECTIONS CH1
Each 4-20mA output channel is connected to a receiving device with twisted pair wires. (See Figure E5-3.) For extremely noisy environments, use shielded twisted pair wire. See the discussion on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" in the Chapter 1 and the EMC Guidelines.
E.5 -2
Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel)
The shield connections are internally connected to the Single Point Ground (SPG) to which the system rack is connected. No external connection should be made.
Figure E5-3. Receiving Devices and Power Supply Connections
RECEIVING DEVICE
SCREW TERMINALS 1 2
CH2 CH1
RECEIVING DEVICE
CH1
CH2 CH2 CH2
3 4 5 6
CH1
CH1
CH3 CH3 CH3
CH4 CH4 CH4 CH4
7 8 9 10
CH5
CH3
CH5 CH5
CH6 CH6 CH6 CH6
11 12 13 14 15
+V External
CH5
Power Supply +15 V
(Pins 13, 14, 16, and 18 not used)
16 17 18 19
SHIELD SHIELD +V Common
0V TO SINGLEPOINT GROUND
20 21
SHIELD
SHIELD
22 23
SHIELD
SHIELD
24 25 (No external connection)
E.5 -3
Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel)
Theory of Operation
The CPU module sends the output module a 16-bit digital word for each channel used. Each digital word is converted to a corresponding current within the range 420mA. The current is brought out to a pair of screw terminal connections as a single-ended type current output. You can adjust each channel in software for offset adjustments and gain scaling. For safety reasons, all outputs are automatically reset to 4mA when a scan loss condition occurs. All outputs have clamping diodes and a capacitor to permit the driving of nonresistive (i.e. inductive) loads. All outputs can drive loads whose impedance is less than or equal to: V EXT -------------- = R LOAD 20mA Example: If VEXT = 24V, then the maximum impedance equals: 24V EXT --------------------- = 1020 20mA The load range in this example is from 0 to 1020 . Anytime the load impedance is exceeded, the OPEN flag is set in software. Normally, it is an open circuit that causes this flag to be set.
- 3.6V - 3.6V
E.5 -4
Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel)
Specification Table
Characteristic
Output 4-20mA (6 ch) specification
Function Part number Field side connector Output channels Resolution Zero Offset Accuracy Output current, max. Output update time increment Output voltage after power up Response to "scan loss" Short circuit protection Indicator light, module External power supply +V and current Line and load regulation Maximum noise Isolation
Converts a 15-bit digital value into a 4-20mA analog current signal for each of six channels 502-03681-02 25-pin card edge connector, screw terminals 6 15 bits, or 32,768 steps over the full output range .1% FSR (Full Scale Range)over full temperature range .1% FSR (Full Scale Range)over full temperature range 20 mA 100 sec
VOUT = IOUT * RLOAD
All outputs reset to 4mA
Current is limited to: IOUT = where IOUT = 4 to 20mA
DIAG LED goes off after module passes its diagnostic tests
+15 V to +24 V: 250mA .5% 100mV pk-pk
Field side has differential isolation via Op Amp buffer between logic and field side The open alarm flag is optically isolated between field and logic side 125 mA @ +5V 30 mA @+15V 18 mA @ -15V 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
Logic side power requirements (typical) Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
E.5 -5
Output 4-20mA Module (6 channel)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/31/ EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
E.5 -6
E.6 -
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Introduction
The analog in/out module provides: 4 analog input channels * 4 analog output channels
*
The DIAG LED goes on briefly while the diagnostic tests are running.
Figure E6-1. Analog In/ 10V Out Module
IN/OUT ANALOG
Name of module Diagnostic LED
DIAG
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39
Screw terminal connector
Door
E.6 -1
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Connections
All signals to the module must come to the screw terminal connectors through shielded twisted pair wires. Shielded twisted pair wires are used to connect: Each analog output channel to a receiving device. * All analog input signals to the module.
*
These wires must be protected against electrical noise because of the speed and/or voltage levels of the signals transmitted through them. See the discussion on "Preventing electrical noise in data lines" in the Hardware chapter and the EMC guidelines. Shields are provided for the analog input section and for the analog output section. Any power supplies used must be connected to SPG. Figure E6-2 shows the assignments for all the screw terminal connections on the module.
E.6 -2
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Figure E6-2. Connections for the Analog In/ 10V Out Module Terminals
SCREW TERMINALS
1 CONNECTIONS 3 An In Ch 1+ An In Ch 2+ An In Ch 25 An In Ch 17 CONNECTIONS
Analog Input
Ch 1 250 resistor
Analog Input
Ch 2 250 resistor An In Ch 4+ An In Ch 4Ch 4 250 resistor
9 An In Ch 3+ 11 An In Ch 313 Ch 3 250 resistor 15 Shield
Analog Input Shields
Analog Input Shields
Shield Shield
17 Shield 19 Shield 21
23 An Out Ch 1+ An Out Ch 2+ 25 An Out Ch 1An Out Ch 227 An Out Ch 3+ An Out Ch 4+ 29 An Out Ch 3An Out Ch 431 Shield
Analog Output
Analog Output
Analog Output Shields
Analog Output Shields
Shield
33 Shield 35 Shield 37 39
Shield
E.6 -3
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Analog Output Connections
You may connect the differential type output from this module to a single-ended or differential input device. Figure E6-3 shows the difference between the two types of connections. Note that one wire in the twisted pair is connected to the 0 V terminal on the single-ended receiving device. This 0V terminal must be referenced to the SPG through the device's ground connection.
Figure E6-3. Differential and single-ended receiving devices
Receiving Device Differential input device
CH1 CH1
Analog Out Section 25
CH1
GND
CH1 CH2 0V
Channel 1 Channel 2
To SPG
GND
CH2 CH2
27
Single-ended input device
To SPG
33 35 37
Analog Input Connections
Each input channel has three connection pins. The signals are: + voltage input - voltage input 250 ohm current sense resistor for 0/20 mA and 4/20 mA applications When connecting an analog voltage output device to the module, the positive wire of the twisted pair goes to the + screw terminal and the negative wire goes to the screw terminal. Figure E6-4 illustrates these connections for channel one. Notice that no connection is made to the screw terminal with the internal 250 resistor when connecting a voltage source device.
E.6 -4
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Figure E6-4. Voltage Input Connections Analog Input Section
Voltage + signal source
Ch 1 +
5 Channel 1
-
Ch 1 Ch 1 250 ohm Resistor
7 9 11 13 15
To SPG
Shield
17
When using a 0 to 20 mA or 4 to 20 mA current output device, the positive wire of the twisted pair is connected to the + input and the negative wire is connected to the 250 resistor input. A jumper is placed between the - input and the 250 resistor input as shown in Figure E6-5 (from pin 8 to pin 10 for channel 2). This connects a 250 internal resistor across the input.
Figure E6-5. Current Input Connections (0 to 20 or 4 to 20 mA) Analog Input Section
Current signal source 5
Ch 2 +
Power + supply
+
Ch 2 Ch 2 250 ohm Resistor
-
0 to 20 or 4 to 20 mA
7 9 11 13 15
To SPG
Shield
17
An alternative method of connecting a two wire 4 to 20 mA current device is shown in Figure E6-6. Place a jumper between the - input and the 250 resistor input.
E.6 -5
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Figure E6-6. Current Input Connections (4 to 20 mA)
Current signal source
+ Input from power supply
Output
Analog Input Section
5
Ch 2 +
Power + supply
Ch 2 -
7 9
-
Ch 2 250 ohm Resistor
11 13 15
To SPG
Shield
17
Figure E6-7 illustrates an example of wiring an external potentiometer to the module using twisted pair wire. For this example, set up the channel initialization function (A_INCHIT) in software for 5 V unipolar with a filter of 100 ms. The 5 V power supply output voltage adjustment can be set for the maximum potentiometer output value. For example, the supply could be adjusted until the VALU output of the analog input channel read function (A_INCHRD) reads 4095 with the pot at its maximum position.
E.6 -6
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Figure E6-7. Adding an External Potentiometer Analog Input Section
5Volt Adjustable Regulated Power supply
1K to 50K Pot
5
Ch 2 + Ch 2 -
+ -
7 9
To SPG
Ch 2 250 ohm Resistor
11 13 15
Shield
17
Analog Output Theory of Operation
The CPU sends the analog output section a 16-bit digital word for each analog output channel used. Each digital word is converted to a corresponding voltage within the range of 11 V. The voltage is buffered and brought out to a pair of screw terminal connections as a differential type voltage output. This output is less subject to interference from electrical noise than a single-ended output would be. You can adjust each analog output channel in software for offset adjustments, gain scaling, and unipolar outputs. For safety reasons, all outputs are automatically reset to 0 V when a scan loss condition occurs.
Analog Input Theory of Operation
A 12 bit A/D converter samples each analog input channel in sequence at the input scan rate. These values are stored in memory on the module so that any channel value can be read while the A/D converter is processing another channel sample. Each channel can be set up for a maximum input sensitivity of .125 V to 10 V, bipolar or unipolar, or for 4 to 20 mA or 0 to 20 mA current input. To sense current the internal 250 resistor must be connected as shown in Figures E6-5 or E6-6. All inputs are differential and filtered for a high degree of noise immunity. The default noise filter time constant is 1 ms. If more noise filtering is required, two longer time constants, 10 ms and 100 ms, are software selectable. The longer time constants will improve noise immunity but lengthen signal response time.
E.6 -7
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Using the longer time constants may reduce closed position loop performance if the input is used for position feedback.
Specification Table
Characteristic
Analog In/10V Out module specifications
Function
Converts a 16-bit digital word into a 11V analog output signal for each of four channels Converts an analog input signal into a 12-bit digital word for each of four channels.
Part number Logic side power requirements (typical)
502-03907-03 192 mA @ +5V 70 mA @ +15V 53 mA @ -15V Analog Output 1 mA per energized output @ +5V 11 mA per energized output @ +15V 11 mA per energized output @ -15V
Field side connection Indicator light, module Operating temperature range Storage temperature range Humidity
40 pin card edge connector, screw terminals DIAG LED goes off after the module passes its diagnostic tests 7 C to 55 C (45 F to 131 F) -40 C to 85 C (-40 F to 185 F) 5 to 95%, non-condensing
E.6 -8
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
CE Marked
Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
UL and C/UL Listed Physical size
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers 1.6" wide x 12" high x 8.4" deep (including latch) 41 mm x 305 mm x 213 mm
E.6 -9
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Analog Output section (4 ch)
Output channels Resolution Output voltage characteristics Nominal voltage range Voltage accuracy @ 11 V Output current, max. @ 10V Output update time increment Output voltage after power up Response to "scan loss" Output ripple Short circuit protection Response to scan loss
Analog Input section (4 ch)
4 16 bits, or 65536 steps over the full output range
11 VDC 5% 10 mA 32 sec 0 V 20 mV
All outputs reset to 0 V 20 mV < 10 mVRMS at 30 KHz
Current limited outputs All outputs are reset to the OFF state
Input channels Resolution Input sensitivity (software selectable) Voltage ranges
4 12 bits, or 4096 steps over the full input range
Unipolar 0 to 10 V 0 to 5V 0 to 2.5V 0 to 1.25V 0 to 1V 0 to .5 V 0 to .25V 0 to .125V
Bipolar 10 V 5 V 2.5 V 1.25V 1 V .5 V .25 V .125 V
Current range
0 to 20 mA, 4 to 20 mA
Common mode maximum voltage 40V (The maximum voltage that can safely be applied between either input terminal and circuit common.) Common mode operating voltage 11V (The maximum voltage that can be applied between either input terminal and circuit common with inputs still operating properly.)
E.6 -10
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
Internal current sense resistor Maximum current sense resistor power Differential input resistance (each input to ground) Filter time constant - software selection Accuracy
250 ohms .12 W 1 M Ohms 1 ms, 10 ms, 100 ms .5% of FSR at 25oC 100 PPM /oC From 2 counts @ 10V to 8 counts @ .125V 10-57 Hz (constant amplitude .15 mm) 57 - 2000 Hz (acceleration 2 g) Four shocks per axis (15g/11 msec)
0 Offset Vibration (per IEC 68-2-6) Shock (per IEC 68-2-27)
E.6 -11
Analog Input\10V Output (4 Channel)
E.6 -12
Appendix G - Barrier Module
G1 -
Barrier Module
Barrier Module for Empty Slot
A Barrier module is available for any empty slot in the system rack. The part number for the barrier module is M.1016.9125 (old # 502-03673-00).
Figure G1-1. The Barrier Module
AA840-1191
G1 -3
Barrier Module
UL and C/UL Listed CE Marked
File No. E126417 NRAQ Programmable Controllers Conforms to Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC, 92/ 31/EEC, 93/68/EEC by conforming to the following standards: EN 50081-2:1993 EMC Generic Industrial Emissions EN 50082-2:1995 EMC Generic Industrial Immunity EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low voltage directive requirements for programmable controllers Operates with emissions below EN55011/ CISPR 11 Class A limits Immune to: * Electrostatic discharge (4K V contact mode, 8K V air discharge) per EN61000-4-2 * RF electromagnetic fields per EN61000-4-3, ENV 50141, and ENV50204 * Electrical fast transients per EN61000-4-4 * Magnetic fields per EN61000-4-8 Refer to the EMC Guidelines for more information.
G1 -4
Appendix H - Wiring Worksheets
H.1 -
Wiring Worksheets
Output 24 V DC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
group 1 DC common group 1 DC line group 1 output 1 group 1 output 2 group 1 output 3 group 1 output 4 group 2 DC common group 2 DC line group 2 output 5 group 2 output 6
11 group 2 output 7 12 group 2 output 8 13 group 3 DC common 14 group 3 DC line 15 group 3 output 9 16 group 3 output 10 17 group 3 output 11 18 group 3 output 12 19 group 4 DC common 20 group 4 DC line 21 group 4 output 13 22 group 4 output 14 23 group 4 output 15 24 group 4 output 16 25 group 4 zener common
H.1 -3
Wiring Worksheets
Output 24 V DC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 group 1 DC common 2 group 1 DC line 3 group 1 output 1 4 group 1 output 2 5 group 1 output 3 6 group 1 output 4 7 group 1 output 5 8 group 1 output 6 9 group 1 output 7 10 group 1 output 8 11 group 2 DC common 12 group 2 DC line 13 group 2 output 9 14 group 2 output 10 15 group 2 output 11 16 group 2 output 12 17 group 2 output 13 18 group 2 output 14 19 group 2 output 15 20 group 2 output 16 21 group 3 DC common 22 group 3 DC line 23 group 3 output 17 24 group 3 output 18 25 group 3 output 19 26 group 3 output 20 27 group 3 output 21 28 group 3 output 22 29 group 3 output 23 30 group 3 output 24 31 group 4 DC common 32 group 4 DC line 33 group 4 output 25 34 group 4 output 26 35 group 4 output 27 36 group 4 output 28 37 group 4 output 29 38 group 4 output 30 39 group 4 output 31 40 group 4 output 32
Rack #
Slot #
H.1 -4
Wiring Worksheets
Input 24V DC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
(not used) group 1 DC sink / source group 1 input 1 group 1 input 2 group 1 input 3 group 1 input 4 (not used) group 2 DC sink / source group 2 input 5 group 2 input 6
11 group 2 input 7 12 group 2 input 8 13 (not used) 14 group 3 DC sink / source 15 group 3 input 9 16 group 3 input 10 17 group 3 input 11 18 group 3 input 12 19 (not used) 20 group 4 DC sink / source 21 group 4 input 13 22 group 4 input 14 23 group 4 input 15 24 group 4 input 16 25 (not used)
H.1 -5
Wiring Worksheets
Input 24V DC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 (not used) 2 group 1 input 1 3 group 1 input 2 4 group 1 input 3 5 group 1 input 4 6 group 1 input 5 7 group 1 input 6 8 group 1 input 7 9 group 1 input 8 10 group 1 DC sink / source 11 (not used) 12 group 2 input 9 13 group 2 input 10 14 group 2 input 11 15 group 2 input 12 16 group 2 input 13 17 group 2 input 14 18 group 2 input 15 19 group 2 input 16 20 group 2 DC sink / source 21 (not used) 22 group 3 input 17 23 group 3 input 18 24 group 3 input 19 25 group 3 input 20 26 group 3 input 21 27 group 3 input 22 28 group 3 input 23 29 group 3 input 24 30 group 3 DC sink / source 31 (not used) 32 group 4 input 25 33 group 4 input 26 34 group 4 input 27 35 group 4 input 28 36 group 4 input 29 37 group 4 input 30 38 group 4 input 31 39 group 4 input 32 40 group 4 DC sink / source Rack # Slot #
H.1 -6
Wiring Worksheets
Output 120/240V AC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
group 1 AC line group 1 AC common group 1 output 1 group 1 output 2 group 1 output 3 group 1 output 4 group 2 AC line group 2 AC common group 2 output 5 group 2 output 6
11 group 2 output 7 12 group 2 output 8 13 group 3 AC line 14 group 3 AC common 15 group 3 output 9 16 group 3 output 10 17 group 3 output 11 18 group 3 output 12 19 group 4 AC line 20 group 4 AC common 21 group 4 output 13 22 group 4 output 14 23 group 4 output 15 24 group 4 output 16 25 (not used)
H.1 -7
Wiring Worksheets
Output 120/240V AC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 group 1 AC line 2 group 1 AC common 3 group 1 output 1 4 group 1 output 2 5 group 1 output 3 6 group 1 output 4 7 group 1 output 5 8 group 1 output 6 9 group 1 output 7 10 group 1 output 8 11 group 2 AC line 12 group 2 AC common 13 group 2 output 9 14 group 2 output 10 15 group 2 output 11 16 group 2 output 12 17 group 2 output 13 18 group 2 output 14 19 group 2 output 15 20 group 2 output 16 21 group 3 AC line 22 group 3 AC common 23 group 3 output 17 24 group 3 output 18 25 group 3 output 19 26 group 3 output 20 27 group 3 output 21 28 group 3 output 22 29 group 3 output 23 30 group 3 output 24 31 group 4 AC line 32 group 4 AC common 33 group 4 output 25 34 group 4 output 26 35 group 4 output 27 36 group 4 output 28 37 group 4 output 29 38 group 4 output 30 39 group 4 output 31 40 group 4 output 32 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -8
Wiring Worksheets
Input 120V AC (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 group 1 AC sink / source (not used) group 1 input 1 group 1 input 2 group 1 input 3 group 1 input 4 group 2 AC sink / source (not used) group 2 input 5 group 2 input 6 group 2 input 7 group 2 input 8 group 3 AC sink / source (not used) group 3 input 9 group 3 input 10 group 3 input 11 group 3 input 12 group 4 AC sink / source (not used) group 4 input 13 group 4 input 14 group 4 input 15 group 4 input 16 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -9
Wiring Worksheets
Output 10V DC (8 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 shield shield shield shield shield shield shield shield shield channel 7 channel 8 channel 5 channel 6 channel 3 channel 4 channel 1 channel 2 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -10
Wiring Worksheets
Output 10V DC (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 (not used) (not used) (not used) (not used) (not used) (not used) (not used) (not used) shield shield shield shield shield shield shield shield shield channel 3 channel 4 channel 1 channel 2 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -11
Wiring Worksheets
Input Encoder (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 channel 1 input A 2 channel 1 input 3 channel 1 input B 4 channel 1 input 5 channel 1 index 6 channel 1 7 channel 2 input A 8 channel 2 input 9 channel 2 input B 10 channel 2 input 11 channel 2 index 12 channel 2 13 channel 3 input A 14 channel 3 input 15 channel 3 input B 16 channel 3 input 17 channel 3 index 18 channel 3 19 channel 4 input A 20 channel 4 input 21 channel 4 input B 22 channel 4 input 23 channel 4 index 24 channel 4 25 shield 26 shield 27 shield 28 shield 29 shield 30 shield 31 shield 32 shield 33 channel 1 fast input 34 channel 1 35 channel 2 fast input 36 channel 2 37 channel 3 fast input 38 channel 3 39 channel 4 fast input 40 channel 4 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -12
Wiring Worksheets
Input Encoder (2 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 channel 1 input A 2 channel 1 input 3 channel 1 input B 4 channel 1 input 5 channel 1 index 6 channel 1 7 channel 2 input A 8 channel 2 input 9 channel 2 input B 10 channel 2 input 11 channel 2 index 12 channel 2 13 (not used) 14 (not used) 15 (not used) 16 (not used) 17 (not used) 18 (not used) 19 (not used) 20 (not used) 21 (not used) 22 (not used) 23 (not used) 24 (not used) 25 shield 26 shield 27 shield 28 shield 29 shield 30 shield 31 shield 32 shield 33 channel 1 fast input 34 channel 1 35 channel 2 fast input 36 channel 2 37 (not used) 38 (not used) 39 (not used) 40 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -13
Wiring Worksheets
Input Resolver (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 channel 1 feedback 2 channel 1 3 channel 1 RPO 4 channel 1 5 channel 1 QPO 6 channel 1 7 channel 2 feedback 8 channel 2 9 channel 2 RPO 10 channel 2 11 channel 2 QPO 12 channel 2 13 channel 3 feedback 14 channel 3 15 channel 3 RPO 16 channel 3 17 channel 3 QPO 18 channel 3 19 channel 4 feedback 20 channel 4 21 channel 4 RPO 22 channel 4 23 channel 4 QPO 24 channel 4 25 shield 26 shield 27 shield 28 shield 29 shield 30 shield 31 shield 32 shield 33 channel 1 fast input 34 channel 1 35 channel 2 fast input 36 channel 2 37 channel 3 fast input 38 channel 3 39 channel 4 fast input 40 channel 4 Rack # (red/white) (yellow/white) (red) (black) (yellow) (blue) (red/white) (yellow/white) (red) (black) (yellow) (blue) (red/white) (yellow/white) (red) (black) (yellow) (blue) (red/white) (yellow/white) (red) (black) (yellow) (blue) Slot #
H.1 -14
Wiring Worksheets
Input Resolver (2 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 channel 1 feedback 2 channel 1 3 channel 1 RPO 4 channel 1 5 channel 1 QPO 6 channel 1 7 channel 2 feedback 8 channel 2 9 channel 2 RPO 10 channel 2 11 channel 2 QPO 12 channel 2 13 (not used) 14 (not used) 15 (not used) 16 (not used) 17 (not used) 18 (not used) 19 (not used) 20 (not used) 21 (not used) 22 (not used) 23 (not used) 24 (not used) 25 shield 26 shield 27 shield 28 shield 29 shield 30 shield 31 shield 32 shield 33 channel 1 fast input 34 channel 1 35 channel 2 fast input 36 channel 2 37 (not used) 38 (not used) 39 (not used) 40 (not used) Rack # (red/white) (yellow/white) (red) (black) (yellow) (blue) (red/white) (yellow/white) (red) (black) (yellow) (blue) Slot #
H.1 -15
Wiring Worksheets
Input Analog (8 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 channel 1 input + 2 channel 2 input + 3 channel 1 input 4 channel 2 input 5 channel 1 250 resistor 6 channel 2 250 resistor 7 channel 3 input + 8 channel 4 input + 9 channel 3 input 10 channel 4 input 11 channel 3 250 resistor 12 channel 4 250 resistor 13 channel 5 input + 14 channel 6 input + 15 channel 5 input 16 channel 6 input 17 channel 5 250 resistor 18 channel 6 250 resistor 19 channel 7 input + 20 channel 8 input + 21 channel 7 input 22 channel 8 input 23 channel 7 250 resistor 24 channel 8 250 resistor 25 (not used) 26 (not used) 27 common 28 common 29 common 30 common 31 common 32 shield 33 shield 34 shield 35 shield 36 shield 37 shield 38 shield 39 shield 40 shield Rack # Slot #
H.1 -16
Wiring Worksheets
Thermocouple TEMP J-K (12 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
channel 1 + channel 2+ channel 1 channel 2 channel 3 + channel 4+ channel 3 channel 4 channel 5 + channel 6+
11 channel 5 12 channel 6 13 channel 7 + 14 channel 8+ 15 channel 7 16 channel 8 17 channel 9 + 18 channel 10+ 19 channel 9 20 channel 10 21 channel 11 + 22 channel 12+ 23 channel 11 24 channel 12 25 common
H.1 -17
Wiring Worksheets
Output 24 V DC Sink (32 pt, 1 to 16 diode protected) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 group 1 DC common 2 group 1 DC line 3 group 1 sink 1 4 group 1 sink 2 5 group 1 sink 3 6 group 1 sink 4 7 group 1 sink 5 8 group 1 sink 6 9 group 1 sink 7 10 group 1 sink 8 11 group 1 DCOUT 12 group 2 DCOUT 13 group 2 sink 9 14 group 2 sink 10 15 group 2 sink 11 16 group 2 sink 12 17 group 2 sink 13 18 group 2 sink 14 19 group 2 sink 15 20 group 2 sink 16 21 group 3 DC common 22 group 3 DC line 23 group 3 sink 17 24 group 3 sink 18 25 group 3 sink 19 26 group 3 sink 20 27 group 3 sink 21 28 group 3 sink 22 29 group 3 sink 23 30 group 3 sink 24 31 group 3 DCOUT 32 group 4 DCOUT 33 group 4 sink 25 34 group 4 sink 26 35 group 4 sink 27 36 group 4 sink 28 37 group 4 sink 29 38 group 4 sink 30 39 group 4 sink 31 40 group 4 sink 32 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -18
Wiring Worksheets
Output 24 V DC Sink (32 pt all diode protected) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 group 1 DC common 2 group 1 DC line 3 group 1 sink 1 4 group 1 sink 2 5 group 1 sink 3 6 group 1 sink 4 7 group 1 sink 5 8 group 1 sink 6 9 group 1 sink 7 10 group 1 sink 8 11 group 1 DCOUT 12 group 2 DCOUT 13 group 2 sink 9 14 group 2 sink 10 15 group 2 sink 11 16 group 2 sink 12 17 group 2 sink 13 18 group 2 sink 14 19 group 2 sink 15 20 group 2 sink 16 21 group 3 DC common 22 group 3 DC line 23 group 3 sink 17 24 group 3 sink 18 25 group 3 sink 19 26 group 3 sink 20 27 group 3 sink 21 28 group 3 sink 22 29 group 3 sink 23 30 group 3 sink 24 31 group 3 DCOUT 32 group 4 DCOUT 33 group 4 sink 25 34 group 4 sink 26 35 group 4 sink 27 36 group 4 sink 28 37 group 4 sink 29 38 group 4 sink 30 39 group 4 sink 31 40 group 4 sink 32 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -19
Wiring Worksheets
Input RTD (6 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
channel 1 common channel 1 pin 3 channel 1 pin 2 channel 1 pin 1 channel 2 common channel 2 pin 3 channel 2 pin 2 channel 2 pin 1 channel 3 common channel 3 pin 3
11 channel 3 pin 2 12 channel 3 pin 1 13 channel 4 common 14 channel 4 pin 3 15 channel 4 pin 2 16 channel 4 pin 1 17 channel 5 common 18 channel 5 pin 3 19 channel 5 pin 2 20 channel 5 pin 1 21 channel 6 common 22 channel 6 pin 3 23 channel 6 pin 2 24 channel 6 pin 1 25 common (to SPG)
H.1 -20
Wiring Worksheets
Serial Communications (2,4 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 RD1_232 2 CTS1_232 3 TD1_232 4 RTS1_232 5 RD1_DIF+ 6 TD1_DIF+ 7 RD1_DIF8 TD1_DIF9 common 10 DTR_A 11 shield 12 CTS2_232 13 RD2_232 14 RTS2_232 15 TD2_232 16 TD2_DIF+ 17 RD2__DIF+ 18 TD2_DIF19 RD2_DIF20 CTS3_232 21 RD3_232 22 RTS3_232 23 TD3_232 24 TD3_DIF+ 25 RD3_DIF+ 26 TD3-DIF27 RD3_DIF28 DTR_B 29 common 30 shield 31 RD4_232 32 CTS4_232 33 TD4_232 34 RTS4_232 35 RD4_DIF+ 36 TD4_DIF+ 37 RD4_DIF38 TD4_DIF39 (not used) 40 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -21
Wiring Worksheets
Output 4-20mA (6 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
channel 1 channel 2 channel 1 channel 2 channel 3 channel 4 channel 3 channel 4 channel 5 channel 6
11 channel 5 12 channel 6 13 (not used) 14 (not used) 15 + V external 16 (not used) 17 + V common 18 (not used) 19 shield 20 shield 21 shield 22 shield 23 shield 24 shield 25 shield
H.1 -22
Wiring Worksheets
Output Stepper (8 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 channel 1 +5 V input 2 channel 2 +5 V input 3 channel 1 step/cw 4 channel 2 step/cw 5 channel 1 direction/ccw 6 channel 2 direction/ccw 7 channel 1 common 8 channel 2 common 9 shield 10 shield 11 channel 3 +5 V input 12 channel 4 +5 V input 13 channel 3 step/cw 14 channel 4 step/cw 15 channel 3 direction/ccw 16 channel 4 direction/ccw 17 channel 3 common 18 channel 4 common 19 shield 20 shield 21 channel 5 +5 V input 22 channel 6 +5 V input 23 channel 5 step/cw 24 channel 6 step/cw 25 channel 5 direction/ccw 26 channel 6 direction/ccw 27 channel 5 common 28 channel 6 common 29 shield 30 shield 31 channel 7 +5 V input 32 channel 8 +5 V input 33 channel 7 step/cw 34 channel 8 step/cw 35 channel 7 direction/ccw 36 channel 8 direction/ccw 37 channel 7 common 38 channel 8 common 39 shield 40 shield Rack # Slot #
H.1 -23
Wiring Worksheets
Output Relay (8 pt) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
NO 1 CT 1 NC 1 (not used) NO 2 CT 2 NC 2 (not used) NO 3 CT 3
11 NC 3 12 (not used) 13 NO 4 14 CT 4 15 NC 4 16 (not used) 17 NO 5 18 NO 5 19 NO 6 20 NO 6 21 NO 7 22 NO 7 23 NO 8 24 NO 8 25 (not used)
H.1 -24
Wiring Worksheets
Input Resolver (12 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 RPO2 2 RPO1 3 / 4 / 5 QPO2 6 QPO1 7 shield 8 channel 2 feedback 9 shield 10 channel 2 11 shield 12 shield 13 channel 2 feedback 14 channel 3 feedback 15 channel 2 16 channel 3 17 shield 18 channel 5 feedback 19 channel 4 feedback 20 channel 5 21 channel 4 22 shield 23 channel 6 feedback 24 channel 7 feedback 25 channel 6 26 channel 7 27 shield 28 channel 9 feedback 29 channel 8 feedback 30 channel 9 31 channel 8 32 shield 33 channel 10 feedback 34 channel 11 feedback 35 channel 10 36 channel 11 37 channel 12 feedback 38 shield 39 channel 12 40 shield Rack # (red) (red) (black) (blue) (black) (blue) (yellow) (yellow) (red/white) (yellow/white) Slot #
(red/white) (red/white) (yellow/white) (yellow/white) (red/white) (red/white) (yellow/white) (yellow/white) (red/white) (red/white) (yellow/white) (yellow/white) (red/white) (red/white) (yellow/white) (yellow/white) (red/white) (red/white) (yellow/white) (yellow/white) (red/white) (yellow/white)
H.1 -25
Wiring Worksheets
Input/Output TTL (24/8 pts) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 Input 1 2 Input 2 3 Input 3 4 Input 4 5 Input 5 6 Input 6 7 Input 7 8 Input 8 9 Input 9 10 Input 10 11 Input 11 12 Input 12 13 Input 13 14 Input 14 15 Input 15 16 Input 16 17 Input 17 18 Input 18 19 Input 19 20 Input 20 21 Input 21 22 Input 22 23 Input 23 24 Input 24 25 (not used) 26 (not used) 27 + 5V external supply 28 common 29 (not used) 30 (not used) 31 Output 1 32 Output 2 33 Output 3 34 Output 4 35 Output 5 36 Output 6 37 Output 7 38 Output 8 39 (not used) 40 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -26
Wiring Worksheets
Input 12V DC (32 pt) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 (not used) 2 group 1 input 1 3 group 1 input 2 4 group 1 input 3 5 group 1 input 4 6 group 1 input 5 7 group 1 input 6 8 group 1 input 7 9 group 1 input 8 10 group 1 DC sink / source 11 (not used) 12 group 2 input 9 13 group 2 input 10 14 group 2 input 11 15 group 2 input 12 16 group 2 input 13 17 group 2 input 14 18 group 2 input 15 19 group 2 input 16 20 group 2 DC sink / source 21 (not used) 22 group 3 input 17 23 group 3 input 18 24 group 3 input 19 25 group 3 input 20 26 group 3 input 21 27 group 3 input 22 28 group 3 input 23 29 group 3 input 24 30 group 3 DC sink / source 31 (not used) 32 group 4 input 25 33 group 4 input 26 34 group 4 input 27 35 group 4 input 28 36 group 4 input 29 37 group 4 input 30 38 group 4 input 31 39 group 4 input 32 40 group 4 DC sink / source Rack # Slot #
H.1 -27
Wiring Worksheets
Input/Output 24V DC (16/8 sink pt) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 (not used) 2 group 1 input 1 3 group 1 input 2 4 group 1 input 3 5 group 1 input 4 6 group 1 input 5 7 group 1 input 6 8 group 1 input 7 9 group 1 input 8 10 group 1 DC sink / source 11 (not used) 12 group 2 input 9 13 group 2 input 10 14 group 2 input 11 15 group 2 input 12 16 group 2 input 13 17 group 2 input 14 18 group 2 input 15 19 group 2 input 16 20 group 2 DC sink / source 21 (not used) 22 (not used) 23 (not used) 24 (not used) 25 (not used) 26 (not used) 27 group 1 DC common 28 group 1 DC line 29 group 1 sink output 1 30 group 1 sink output 2 31 group 1 sink output 3 32 group 1 sink output 4 33 (not used) 34 (not used) 35 group 1 sink output 5 36 group 1 sink output 6 37 group 1 sink output 7 38 group 1 sink output 8 39 group 1 DCOUT 40 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -28
Wiring Worksheets
Input/Output 24V DC (16/8 source pt) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 (not used) 2 group 1 input 1 3 group 1 input 2 4 group 1 input 3 5 group 1 input 4 6 group 1 input 5 7 group 1 input 6 8 group 1 input 7 9 group 1 input 8 10 group 1 DC sink / source 11 (not used) 12 group 2 input 9 13 group 2 input 10 14 group 2 input 11 15 group 2 input 12 16 group 2 input 13 17 group 2 input 14 18 group 2 input 15 19 group 2 input 16 20 group 2 DC sink / source 21 (not used) 22 (not used) 23 (not used) 24 (not used) 25 (not used) 26 (not used) 27 group 1 DC common 28 group 1 DC line 29 group 1 source output 1 30 group 1 source output 2 31 group 1 source output 3 32 group 1 source output 4 33 group 2 DC common 34 group 2 DC line 35 group 2 source output 5 36 group 2 source output 6 37 group 2 source output 7 38 group 2 source output 8 39 (not used) 40 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -29
Wiring Worksheets
Servo Encoder (3 ch) Analog input (4 ch) Analog output (2 ch)
Name of application program 1 channel 1 analog output + 2 channel 1 analog output 3 channel 2 analog output + 4 channel 2 analog output 5 channel 1 analog input + 6 channel 2 analog input + 7 channel 1 analog input 8 channel 2 analog input 9 channel 1 250 resistor 10 channel 2 250 resistor 11 channel 3 analog input + 12 channel 4 analog input + 13 channel 3 analog input 14 channel 4 analog input 15 channel 3 250 resistor 16 channel 4 250 resistor 17 channel 1 encoder input A 18 channel 1 encoder input 19 channel 1 encoder input B 20 channel 1 encoder input 21 channel 1 encoder index 22 channel 1 encoder 23 channel 2 encoder input A 24 channel 2 encoder input 25 channel 2 encoder input B 26 channel 2 encoder input 27 channel 2 encoder index 28 channel 2 encoder 29 channel 3 encoder input A 30 channel 3 encoder input 31 channel 3 encoder input B 32 channel 3 encoder input 33 channel 3 encoder index 34 channel 3 encoder 35 channel 1 fast input 36 channel 1 37 channel 2 fast input 38 channel 2 39 channel 3 fast input 40 channel 3 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -30
Wiring Worksheets
Servo Encoder (3 ch) Analog output (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 channel 1 analog output + 2 channel 1 analog output 3 channel 2 analog output + 4 channel 2 analog output 5 channel 3 analog output + 6 channel 3 analog output 7 channel 4 analog output + 8 channel 4 analog output 9 shield 10 shield 11 shield 12 shield 13 shield 14 shield 15 shield 16 shield 17 channel 1 encoder input A 18 channel 1 encoder input 19 channel 1 encoder input B 20 channel 1 encoder input 21 channel 1 encoder index 22 channel 1 encoder 23 channel 2 encoder input A 24 channel 2 encoder input 25 channel 2 encoder input B 26 channel 2 encoder input 27 channel 2 encoder index 28 channel 2 encoder 29 channel 3 encoder input A 30 channel 3 encoder input 31 channel 3 encoder input B 32 channel 3 encoder input 33 channel 3 encoder index 34 channel 3 encoder 35 channel 1 fast input 36 channel 1 37 channel 2 fast input 38 channel 2 39 channel 3 fast input 40 channel 3 Rack # Slot #
H.1 -31
Wiring Worksheets
Analog input (4 ch)/Analog output (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 (not used) 2 (not used) 3 (not used) 4 (not used) 5 channel 1analog input + 6 channel 2 analog input + 7 channel 1 analog input 8 channel 2 analog input 9 channel 1 250 resistor 10 channel 2 250 resistor 11 channel 3 analog input + 12 channel 4 analog input + 13 channel 3 analog input 14 channel 4 analog input 15 channel 3 250 resistor 16 channel 4 250 resistor 17 shield 18 shield 19 shield 20 shield 21 shield 22 (not used) 23 (not used) 24 (not used) 25 channel 1 analog output + 26 channel 2 analog output + 27 channel 1 analog output 28 channel 2 analog output 29 channel 3 analog output + 30 channel 4 analog output +, 31 channel 3 analog output 32 channel 4 analog output 33 shield 34 shield 35 shield 36 shield 37 shield 38 (not used) 39 (not used) 40 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -32
Wiring Worksheets
Slider/Driver Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program 1 +24V DC input 2 DC common 3 +12V DC output 4 common 5 -12V DC output 6 common 7 RPO from resolver module 8 RPO from resolver module 9 QPO from resolver module 10 QPO from resolver module 11 RPO to slider 1 12 shield 13 RPO from slider 1 14 shield 15 RPO to slider 2 16 shield 17 RPO from slider 2 18 shield 19 QPO to slider 1 20 shield 21 QPO from slider 1 22 shield 23 QPO to slider 2 24 shield 25 QPO from slider 2 26 shield 27 SFDBK from scale amp 1 28 shield 29 SFDBK from scale amp 1 30 shield 31 SFDBK from scale amp 2 32 shield 33 SFDBK from scale amp 2 34 shield 35 FDBK1 to resolver module 36 FDBK1 to resolver module 37 FDBK2 to resolver module 38 FDBK2 to resolver module 39 (not used) 40 (not used) Rack # Slot #
H.1 -33
Wiring Worksheets
Block Output 24V DC Source (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Module #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
line 1 output 1 output 3 output 5 output 7 line 2 output 9 output 11 output 13 output 15 (not used) 24V com 1 output 2 output 4 output 6 output 8 com 2 output 10 output 12 output 14 output 16 0V chassis ground
H.1 -34
Wiring Worksheets
Block Input 24V DC Module (16 pt) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 24V 2 input 1 3 input 3 4 24V 5 input 5 6 input 7 7 24V 8 group 1 ss 9 24V 10 input 9 11 input 11 12 24V 13 input 13 14 input 15 15 24V 16 group 2 ss 17 24V 18 shield 19 0V 20 input 2 21 input 4 22 0V 23 input 6 24 input 8 25 0V 26 group 1 ss 27 0V 28 input 10 29 input 12 30 0V 31 input 14 32 input 16 33 0V 34 group 2 ss 35 0V 36 chassis ground Module #
H.1 -35
Wiring Worksheets
Block Input Analog (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Module #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
24V DC com (not used) channel 1 + channel 1 channel 1 250 ohm resistor shield (not used) channel 2 + channel 2 -
11 channel 2 250 ohm resistor 12 shield 13 chassis ground 14 (not used) 15 (not used) 16 channel 3 + 17 channel 3 18 channel 3 250 ohm resistor 19 shield 20 (not used) 21 channel 4 + 22 channel 4 23 channel 4 250 ohm resistor 24 shield
H.1 -36
Wiring Worksheets
Block Output 4-20 mA (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program Module #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
(not used) (not used) (not used) channel 1 + channel 1 shield (not used) (not used) channel 2 + channel 2 -
11 shield 12 +24V DC 13 (not used) 14 (not used) 15 (not used) 16 channel 3 + 17 channel 3 18 shield 19 (not used) 20 channel 4 + 21 channel 4 22 shield 23 DC common 24 chassis ground
H.1 -37
Wiring Worksheets
Block 24V DC 8 in/8 out Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 DC Line 1 2 output 1 3 output 3 4 output 5 5 output 7 6 (not used) 7 (not used) 8 (not used) 9 24V 10 input 1 11 input 3 12 24V 13 input 5 14 input 7 15 24V 16 input sink/source (ss) 17 24V 18 24V 19 DC Com1 20 output 2 21 output 4 22 output 6 23 output 8 24 (not used) 25 (not used) 26 (not used) 27 0V 28 input 2 29 input 4 30 0V 31 input 6 32 input 8 33 0V 34 input sink/source (ss) 35 0V 36 Chassis ground Module #
H.1 -38
Wiring Worksheets
Input Resolver (6 ch) Wiring Worksheet
Name of application program Rack # Slot #
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
RPO RPO GND shield feedback 1+ feedback 1shield feedback 2+ feedback 2shield feedback 3+ feedback 324V QPO QPO GND feedback 4+ feedback 4shield feedback 5+ feedback 5shield feedback 6+ feedback 60V Chassis ground
H.1 -39
Wiring Worksheets
Output Stepper/Input Encoder/Input 24V DC Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 ST1 STEP/CW 2 ST1 DIR/CW 3 ST1 +VIN 4 +5V OUT 5 ST1 +VINCOM 6 +5V OUTCOM 7 shield 8 +5V output 9 ENC1A 10 ENC1A 11 ENC1B 12 ENC1B 13 ENC1INDEX 14 ENC1INDEX 15 input 1 16 0V 17 24V 18 24V 19 ST2 STEP/CW 20 ST2 DIR/CW 21 ST2 +VIN 22 +5V OUT 23 ST2 +VINCOM 24 +5V OUTCOM 25 shield 26 +5V OUT 27 ENC2A 28 ENC2A 29 ENC2B 30 ENC2B 31 ENC2 INDEX 32 ENC2 INDEX 33 input 2 34 input sink /source (ss) 35 0V 36 Chassis ground Rack # Slot #
H.1 -40
Wiring Worksheets
Output Analog 10V DC (4 ch) Wiring Worksheet Name of application program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 (not used) (not used) (not used) Ch1+ Ch1shield (not used) (not used) Ch2+ Ch2shield +24VDC (not used) (not used) (not used) Ch3+ Ch3shield (not used) Ch4+ Ch4shield DC Com Chassis GND Rack # Slot #
H.1 -41
Wiring Worksheets
NOTES
H.1 -42
Appendix I - Wiring Jig
I.1 -
A Wiring Jig
Making a jig
The PiC was designed to get maximum controlling power in as small a footprint as possible. This can cause a problem because the screw terminal connectors are difficult to get at when the modules are installed in the rack. If you lay the module on the bench to make connections, the wires may be too short or too long when the system is set up. This puts stress on the connections, which may become disconnected and cause problems. An installation jig brings the connectors out where you can see what you are doing and still cut the wires to the correct length. Directions for making one are given here.
Figure I-1. Jig for Wiring I/O Modules
PIC900 system rack
CSM CPU
2 pieces sheet metal 8.5" x 6.5"
PiC PiC PiC PiC PiC PiC PiC PiC PiC PiC
1" pine 16.8" x 6.5"
AA115-1390
1. This jig was designed for use with the 10-slot system rack. Cut 10 grooves in the pine
board, 3/8" across and 1/2" deep. They will be about 1 1/2" apart. Adjust the length of the board and the number of grooves to fit different sized system racks.
2. The PIC900 system rack already has holes drilled in its sides, 5 1/2" apart. Drill two
holes to match along one of the short sides of each metal plate, and three screw holes along the other side.
I.1 -3
A Wiring Jig
Figure G1-2. Side plate of the jig
system rack
pine board
5.5"
6.5"
8.5"
AA116-1390
3. Use 3 wood screws to fasten a metal side to one end of the grooved pine board, and
repeat with the second metal piece at the other end of the board. The jig is now ready for use. Using a jig
1. Remove the hardware modules in the PIC900 system rack. 2. Unscrew the screw terminal connector from each I/O module and pull it off. 3. Push it into the corresponding groove in the jig, with the top of the screw terminal
connector at the top of the jig. Keep the screw terminal connectors in the same order as their modules in the system rack, so you can replace each connector on the correct module.
4. Fit the jig over the rack. Insert 2 fasteners through the drill holes on each side of the
jig, into the top and middle holes on the sides of the rack, to keep it in place during wiring.
5. Connect the wires to their assigned screw terminals starting from the bottom left ter-
minal, as shown in the Hardware chapter.
6. When all the wiring is finished, pull each screw terminal connector from its slot in
turn.
7. Unfasten the jig and store it. 8. Install hardware modules as specified and push the screw terminal connector on its
respective module.
I.1 -4
Appendix J - Power-on Circuitry
J.1 -
Power-on Circuitry
Wiring One Axis to Power-On Circuitry
This appendix presents an explanation of wiring one axis to power-on circuitry. In any application, it is important to provide for the safe starting and stopping of a machine. Variations to this recommended method are acceptable as long as they follow this intent. Figure J-1 on the next page illustrates the power-on circuitry for one axis. Additional axes needed for an application should be wired in a similar manner.
1.
There are three switches in series with the POWER-ON relay: 1. MACHINE ON switch 2. EMERGENCY STOP (E-stop) pushbutton 3. MACHINE START pushbutton The MACHINE ON switch and the EMERGENCY STOP pushbutton are normally closed. The MACHINE START pushbutton must be pressed to energize the POWER-ON relay. It is assumed that power is supplied to this circuit through an output module. This module must have its source power available at all times. A ladder diagram module (LDO) in the PIC900 is used to control the turning on and turning off of power through this module. When the LDO is not being scanned, there is no power supplied through the output module.
2.
When the POWER-ON relay is energized, the POWER-ON contact 2 is used to latch it on. POWER-ON contact 1 and contacts from the series switches are brought back through an input module to be monitored by the LDO. Since the POWER-ON relay does not typically have enough contacts or does not have contacts of high enough current rating, POWER-ON contact 3 is used to energize an AUXILIARY POWER-ON contactor. Power is supplied through AUXILIARY POWER ON contact 1 to the AXIS 1 POWER-ON contactor (M1). The plus and minus end-of-travel (EOT) limit switches are wired in series with this path. The END LIMIT OVERRIDE pushbutton is used to allow backing the machine off the limit switch if it is sitting on it. The status of the end limit switches is also brought back through an input module. This allows LDO control over the direction used for moving off an end limit.
3.
4.
J.1 -3
Power-on Circuitry
5. 6.
Power is supplied to other output modules through AUXILIARY POWER-ON contact 2. When applicable, a contact from relay M1A is used to enable the servo drive for axis 1. This relay is controlled by the LDO. Typically, it is turned on two seconds after the POWER-ON contact 1 is detected as closed. Losing LDO scan, pressing of the E-STOP PB, or opening the MACHINE ON switch will remove power from machine operations.
7.
J.1 -4
Power-on Circuitry
Figure J1-1. Recommended Power-On Circuitry
120V AC or 24V DC
PIC900 Output 120V AC (or 24V DC) Module
MACHINE E-STOP ON PB
OFF ON
MACHINE START PB
POWER-ON Relay
M1A
+24V
+24V
+24V
Relay Input 24V DC Module
POWER-ON 2
POWER-ON 1
AUXILIARY POWER-ON 2
Output 120V AC (or 24V DC) Module
120V AC POWER-ON 3
AUXILIARY POWER-ON Contactor
AUXILIARY POWER-ON 1 AXIS 1 POWER-ON Contactor +EOT LS
+24V +24V
-EOT LS M1
END LIMIT OVERRIDE PB
AA1992890
J.1 -5
Power-on Circuitry
J.1 -6
Appendix K - Math Coprocessor Installation
K.1 -
Math Coprocessor Installation (Document 108-31047-00)
Description of Archived Document
(This document is archived and available from Giddings & Lewis by requesting part number 108-31047-00.)
K.1 -3
Math Coprocessor Installation (Document 108-31047-00)
NOTES
K.1 -4
Appendix L - Flash Memory Installation
L.1 -
Flash Memory Installation
Installation of Flash Memory Board
The Flash Memory System (FMS) board provides flash disk storage for things like ladder source files on PiC CPUs with an FMS socket. Files are sent to the FMS board via PiCPro software. The FMS board is available in either a 4 Megabytes (4M) or 8 Megabytes (8M) size. Part numbers 4M FMS Board- 502-03882-00 8M FMS Board- 502-03882-20
Procedure for Installing the FMS Board
1.
Lay the CPU module on a static-free surface, label side up. Ground yourself using a properly grounded wrist strap before you open the CPU module. These are standard precautions before handling any electronic components. Press the plastic tabs at the top and bottom of the CPU module toward each other and lift off the CPU module cover. Figure L-2 shows the location of the FMS socket on a PIC900 and a PiC90. To insert the FMS board in the socket, grasp it by the sides. The component side of the board should face the inside of the CPU module ensuring that the notched end will go into the correct channel of the FMS socket. Avoid touching the contacts at the bottom of the FMS board. See Figure L-1.
Figure L1-1. FMS Board
2.
3.
Latch Hole
GIDDINGS & LEWIS PiC FLASH MEMORY
Latch Hole
Contacts Notch
4.
Line up the sides of the FMS board with the channels on the ends of the FMS socket being sure the notched end of the FMS board is going into the notched end channel of the FMS socket. Press the FMS board firmly in place. Be sure the latches on the FMS socket go into the latch holes on the FMS board.
5.
L.1 -3
Flash Memory Installation
6.
Replace the CPU module cover. Insert the CPU module in the rack. Turn on power at the main disconnect switch.
Figure L1-2. The PIC900/90 CPU Modules: FMS Socket Location
PIC900/90
Notched End of Socket
L.1 -4
FMS Socket
Appendix M - Diagnostic LED Error Codes
M.1 -
Diagnostic LED Error Codes
Error Codes
While the PIC900 is running, the DIAG LED on the CPU module will flash a three digit code signal if there is an error. For example, if there is a long pause-flashpause-flash-flash-pause-flash-flash-flash-long pause, the code is 123. The errors are described below.
Code Error Description
122 123
No math coprocessor Scan too long
Attempted to perform floating point operation with no math coprocessor installed on the CPU. A ladder scan loss has occurred because the CPU takes more than 200 ms to scan the application program. Whenever the scan light is out, the discrete outputs go to the OFF state and the analog outputs are zeroed.
124 125 126 127 222 22_
Excessive overhead Insufficient memory No hardware bit memory No software bit memory Driver error Master rack error
The system overhead update time is excessive. There is insufficient memory on the CPU to run the current program. There is no bit memory installed on the CPU and the program requires it. There is no bit memory capability via software and the program requires it. No driver support on the CPU for the I/O module. Update your system EPROMs. The I/O modules in the master rack do not match what was declared in the hardware master declaration table. The number of flashes in the third digit (_) identifies the slot number that is in error. A failure has occurred in remote I/O communications. The number of expansion racks in the system does not match the number of expansion racks declared in the expansion hardware declaration table.
232* 233*
Communications error Number of racks error
M.1 -3
Diagnostic LED Error Codes
3_ _* Expansion rack error
The I/O modules in the expansion rack(s) or the block I/O modules do not match what was declared in the expansion hardware declaration table. For rack expansion: The number of flashes in the second digit indicates the remote rack (1 through 8). The number of flashes in the third digit indicates the slot number. For block I/O modules: The number of flashes in the second and third digits indicates the block I/O module (01 through 77). The second digit will flash a 1 - 7, 10 for 0. The third digit will flash a 1 - 9, 10 for 0. For example, if the second digit flashes 3 times and the third digit flashes 10 times, the module is 30.
*Errors connected with I/O expansion. Refer to the I/O Driver Module write-up in the Hardware Manual for more information.
M.1 -4
Appendix N - Communication Connections
N.1 -
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
N.1 -1
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Establishing Communications
It is possible to establish communication between PiCs equipped with peer-to-peer communication capability using various connection configurations. These configurations will depend on how many PiCs you are communicating with and how great a distance the total network will cover. Two to seven (eight with some systems) PiCs can be connected using twisted pair wire. The twisted pair wiring can consist of one or more lengths connecting the PiCs. A minimum length of 6 feet (2 m) between devices on a network is required. The total network length end-to-end may be a maximum of 400 feet (122 m). This is referred to as a wire segment. With the use of active hubs, it is possible to link up to 255 PiCs in a network extending up to four miles (6400 m) using twisted pair, coax and/or fiber optics cabling. With coax cable, a minimum length of 6 feet (2 m) between devices on a network is required. The total network length end-to-end may be a maximum of 2000 feet (610 m). With glass fiber optics, there is no minimum length. The total network length end-to-end may be a maximum of 3000 feet (915 m), 6000 feet (1800m), or 9000 feet (2740m) based on 50, 62.5, or 100 micron glass fiber optics cable respectively.
CAUTION Although considerable noise immunity is obtained with the isolated twisted pair interface, care should be taken to route twisted pair wires and coax cables separate from wires used for high voltage, motors, solenoids, etc. Throughout Appendix N1 and N2, refer to the individual module write-ups for the communication connection pinouts for your module.
N.1 -2
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Communication Topologies
There are several possible layouts or topologies for peer-to-peer communications. They are summarized here. The PiC or any device that contains an ARCNET controller chip and cable transceiver and is connected to a network is referred to as a node. The PiC has no internal termination and, therefore, whenever a PiC appears at the end of a segment it must be terminated with a 100 resistor. A device that facilitates interconnecting multiple nodes by matching line impedance is called a hub. The active hubs used here have internal termination.
Bus Topology
In bus topology, the nodes can be connected without the use of a hub. Cabling distances and node numbers are less than when a hub is used. Whenever a bus topology is used, each end of the bus must be terminated with a resistive terminator.
NODE NODE NODE NODE NODE
Terminator
Terminator
Star Topology
The star topology requires the use of a hub. This topology makes troubleshooting easiser since only one node is connected to one port on the hub.
NODE
NODE
Terminator
HUB
Terminator
NODE
NODE
Terminator
Terminator
N.1 -3
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Distributed Star Topology
Whenever hubs are cascaded together, the topology is called a distributed star. Each hub can have various nodes connected to it.
NODE
NODE
Terminator
HUB
HUB
Terminator
NODE
NODE
Terminator
Terminator
Distributed Star/Bus Topology
A star topology can be combined with a bus topology.
NODE
NODE
NODE
NODE
Terminator
HUB
Terminator
NODE
Terminator
N.1 -4
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Connecting PiCs up to 400 feet - Bus Topology
Connections for peer-to-peer expansion using two different types of PiCs are illustrated in Figure N1-1. Twisted pair wire is used. 100 resistors must be installed at each end of the wire segment.
Figure N1-1. Connections between PiC9XXs - Bus Topology
PiC9XX 1
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
PiC9XX 2
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
DATA
TX ACT
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
IN OUT
ARCNET
RS232
Peer-to-peer twisted pair interface
IN OUT
RS232
PIC900
TM
PIC900 Peer-to-peer communications
TM
100 ohm resistor needed at end of wire segment
100 ohm resistor needed at end of wire segment
In
Out
In
Out
N.1 -5
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Connections for peer-to-peer expansion using two PiC9XXs and a PiC90 are illustrated in Figure N1-2. Twisted pair wire is used. 100 resistors must be installed at each end of the wire segment.
Figure N1-2. Connections between PiC90/9XXs - Bus Topology
PiC90
CSM/CPU
PiC9XX
CPU
PiC9XX
CPU
DIAG PWR SCAN BATT
DIAG CONFIG
INOUT
DIAG CONFIG
INOUT
DATA
TX ACT
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
INOUT
ARCNET
INOUT
Run Stop PiC90TM GIDDINGS & LEWIS (R)
Programmable industrial Controller
RS232
RS232
ON OFF
Peer-to-peer twisted pair interface
PIC900
TM
PIC900
TM
L / LINE1 N / LINE2 E / GRND
100 ohm resistor needed at end of wire segment
PiCPro P-P
100 ohm resistor needed at end of wire segment
User Port
N.1 -6
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Figure N1-3 illustrates how multiple PiCs can be connected using twisted pair wire. The total twisted pair wire segment is under 400 feet (122 m). Notice that the ends of the wire segment must be terminated with a 100 resistor.
Figure N1-3. Connecting PiCs within 400 feet (122 m) - Bus Topology
Wire Segment End to end distance up to 400'
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
PIC900/90 100 ohm
100 ohm
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
Twisted pair wire
N.1 -7
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Expanding with Active Hubs
An active hub may be added to the system if greater than 400 feet distances need to be covered and/or if more than eight PiCs need to be included in the network. An active hub also allows you to communicate using a variety of cabling types. The MOD HUB from Contemporary Control Systems, Inc. (CCSI) is an electronic device used to expand networks. Its main function is to match line impedance. It regenerates the network signal for distances from 6 to 400 feet (100 m) using twisted pair cable, from 6 to 2,000 feet (610 m) using RG 62/U coax cable in a bus topology (0 to 2000 in a star topology), or 0 to 9,000 feet (2740 m) using glass fiber optics cable. With the use of a MOD HUB, these cabling types can be intermixed depending upon the requirements of your network. The MOD HUB uses plug-in expansion modules each containing four ports. The ports may be all one type of connection (twisted pair, coax, or fiber optics) or a mix of two types of connections (twisted pair/coax, twisted pair/fiber optics, coax/fiber optics). You decide on the type of cabling or mix of cabling you need and choose the appropriate expansion modules. The MOD HUB is available in two sizes: a 16 port enclosure holding up to four modules or a 48 port enclosure holding up to 12 modules. The MOD HUB requires AC power and is available in 120V or 240V versions. Diagnostic LEDs help with troubleshooting. Each expansion module has LEDs indicating activity for each port. There are four other LEDs on the timing module of the hub. Refer to the MOD HUB documentation from CCSI for more information.
Figure N1-4. MOD HUB 16 with Four Expansion Modules
BNC Connector (Coax)
Reconfiguration LED
MOD HUB
Port Activity LEDs RJ-11 Connector (Twisted Pair)
RECON +PWR -PWR TIMING
Power On LEDs Power On Switch Fuse Box Power Cord Connector
ST Connectors (Glass Fiber Optic) Timing LED
There is also a network interface module (NIM) available from CCSI if you need to interface your network to a PC. The PCX series of NIMs supports coax, twisted pair, or fiber optics connectors on it. See Figure N1-9.
Connectors Coax
Coax cable is connected to the MOD HUB using BNC tee connectors.
N.1 -8
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Figure N1-5. BNC Connector for Coax Cable
BNC Tee Connector BNC Tee Connector
with 93 ohm terminator
Twisted Pair
The twisted pair wire from the PiCs must be connected to an RJ11 modular plug. The pinout for the RJ11 modular plug for any of the recommended CCSI products is shown in Figure N1-6. Be sure that you match polarity when making the connection from the connector on the PiC to the RJ11 modular plug.
Figure N1-6. RJ11 Modular Plug (6 position - 4 contact) for Twisted Pair Wire
To CCSI product
65 432 1
4+ To positive peer-to-peer connection pin on PiC Typically 24 AWG solid wire
3To negative peer-to-peer connection pin on PiC
Refer to the specification table at the end of for alternate wire sizes.
Fiber Optics
Fiber optic cables are duplex, multimode in either 50/125, 62.5/125, or 100/140 micron cable. Use the bayonet style ST connectors.
N.1 -9
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Figure N1-7. ST Connector for Fiber Optic Cable
Connector on module Notch to lock latch onto Latch
Slot Ceramic end of fiber optic cable Notch to slide into slot above
ST style connector on fiber optic cable
AA842-1191
CAUTION Never create a loop with the network cabling. For example, do not connect the PiCs (or hubs) in such a manner that the cabling attached to the last device is also connected to the first device. Figures N1-8 and N1-9 illustrate some of the connection configurations for peerto-peer communication using active hubs. In Figure N1-8, two active hubs are connected using coax cable. The twisted pair wire is used to connect a bus of PiCs to the hubs. Note that the end of the bus is terminated with a 100 resistor.
N.1 -10
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Figure N1-7. MOD HUBs using Coax and Twisted Pair - Distributed Star/Bus Topology
Wire Segment End to end distance up to 400' PIC900/90 PIC900/90 PIC900/90
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
100 ohm
Up to 2000' coax cable
RECON +PWR -PWR TIMING
MOD HUB
RECON +PWR -PWR TIMING
MOD HUB
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
100 ohm
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
Wire Segment End to end distance up to 400'
Key
Coax cable Twisted pair wire
Figure N1-9 shows some other network possibilities. The maximum cable distance between any two PIC900s located at opposite ends of the network is 20,000 feet/4 miles (6400 m). More modules could be added to each MOD HUB as your system requires.
N.1 -11
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Figure N1-8. Cascading Hubs to further Extend the Network - Distributed Star/Bus Topology
93 ohm BNC terminator
PIC900/90
PIC900/90 100 ohm
PC
PCX
Coax Connecting Hub from 6' to 2000'
PIC900/90 MOD HUB
PIC900/90
RECON +PWR -PWR TIMING
Coax Connecting Hub from 6' to 2000'
Fiber Optic Connecting Hub from 0' to 3000, 6000, or 9000'
PC
PCX
RECON +PWR -PWR TIMING
MOD HUB
RECON +PWR -PWR TIMING
MOD HUB
PIC900/90 100 ohm
PIC900/90 100 ohm
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
PIC900/90
Key
Duplex Fiber Coax cable Twisted pair Optic Glass wire cable
Some of the items listed below are available from: Contemporary Control Systems, Inc. (CCSI) 2512 Wisconsin Avenue Downers Grove, IL 60515 Phone: 630 963-7070 It is recommended that they be used for peer-to-peer communications. NOTE: Part numbers may be changed by manufacturers.
N.1 -12
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
CCSI also has network configuration guides available and other information you may find helpful.
Recommended connectivity products
Description
Active MOD HUB
MOD HUB-16 (16 port, 120V) MOD HUB-16E (16 port, 240V) MOD HUB-16F (16 port, 120 V, flange mount) MOD HUB 16 EF (16 port, 240 V, flange mount) MOD HUB-48 (48 port, 120 V) MOD HUB-48E (48 port, 240 V) NOTE: There is also a HUB rack mounting kit available.
EXP modules
The following expansion plug-in modules are available, each with four ports: EXP-TPS (Twisted Pair) EXP-CXS (Coax) EXP-TPS/CXS (Twisted Pair/Coax) EXP-FOG-ST (Glass Fiber Optics with ST connector) EXP-TPS/FOG-ST (Twisted Pair/Glass Fiber Optics with ST connector) EXP-CXS/FOG-ST (Coax/Glass Fiber Optics with ST connector)
PCA (16 bit) module
An ARCNET Network Interface Module for the IBM compatible PC PCA-CXS (Coax) PCA-66-TPB (Twisted Pair) PCX-20-TPB (Twisted Pair) PCA-FOG-ST (Glass Fiber Optics with ST connector) TPB-Terminal Resistor (RJ-11 100 terminator)
ARC DETECTTM BNC Tee connector
Handheld network analyzer recommended for maintaining and troubleshooting your network. BNC/T
93 BNC terminator BNC/TER RG62/U coax cable Glass fiber optics 50/125 62.5/125 100/140 Belden Belden Belden Belden #86262 227822 225872 226822
N.1 -13
Peer-to-Peer Communication Connections
Twisted pair wire
24 or 26 AWG solid or 26 AWG stranded One recommended type is Belden 1227A - 24 AWG solid copper unshielded twisted pair. This comes with two pairs. Use only one pair. For EMC compliance, it is necessary to use shielded twisted pair wire. One recommended type is Belden 9729-24 AWG (7 x 32) stranded conductors. This also comes with two pairs. Use only one pair and terminate the shield wire only if there is a pin provided for this at the ARCNET node.
IMPORTANT
Use of other wire sizes may result in an impedance mismatch that could disable communications with some or all nodes on a network when doing peer-to-peer communications.
N.1 -14
N.2 -
I/O Expansion Connections
Expansion Racks
I/O expansion racks can be added to a PIC900 system. There are three methods of connecting an I/O expansion system.
1.
Local - up to seven expansion racks linked to the master rack, with a maximum segment length between racks of 40 feet (12 m), using twisted pair wire. IMPORTANT The twisted pair interface should only be used for racks within the same enclosure and supplied by the same AC power source. Otherwise electrical noise problems may occur. Noise related problems can be eliminated by using the fiber optic interface in remote expansion. Remote - up to seven expansion racks linked to a master rack, with a maximum segment length between racks of 2000 feet (610 m), using fiber optic cable.
2.
The expansion rack must have either a CSM or a RSM module in slot 1 and an I/O driver module in slot 2. If a PiC90 is used as an expansion rack, it must have the RSM/IO driver module in slot 1/2. The following can be used in the master rack of an I/O expansion system.
CPU Module in Master Rack Number of Expansion Racks Supported
PiC9XX CPU with communication capabilities
1 to 7 racks
The following expansion racks can be used in an I/O expansion system.
Expansion Rack Number of Slots Available
PiC90 with RSM I/O driver PIC900 with RSM or CSM and I/O driver
3 or 5 slots 7, 10, or 13 slots
It is possible to combine local and remote expansion racks in the same system. Use twisted pair wiring to connect racks that are up to 40 feet apart and use fiber optic cable to connect racks that are up to 2000 feet apart. Ring, or loop, topology is used for the layout of an expansion system. The `out' of the last expansion rack is connected to the `in' of the master rack. Rack numbers are assigned in the order each expansion rack is wired in the loop.
N.2 -1
I/O Expansion Connections
IMPORTANT Because of the ring configuration, all expansion racks must be present and have power applied in order for I/O expansion to function properly.
3.
Block I/O - up to 77 block I/O modules in an expansion system. Maximum distance between block modules is 200 feet using shielded twisted pair wire.
Local I/O Expansion
Whenever the wire segments from rack to rack are less than 40 feet (12 m), twisted pair wiring can be used. 18 to 20 AWG stranded twisted pair wire is typically used. Local I/O expansion is intended for connecting expansion racks mounted in the same control cabinet as the master rack. One PiC9XX layout possibility is illustrated in Figure N2-1. Notice that the expansion system forms a loop with expansion rack eight connected to the master rack. A loop configuration is required for all expansion systems.
Figure N2-1. Local Expansion Layout for a PiC9XX Master Rack
PiC9XX Master Out Rack In
PiC9XX Expansion In Rack Out 1
PiC9XX Expansion In Rack Out 5
PiC9XX ExpansionIn Rack Out 2 Each twisted pair segment length 40' maximum PiC9XX Expansion In Rack Out 3
PiC9XX ExpansionIn Rack Out 6
PiC9XX Expansion In Rack Out 7
PiC9XX Expansion In Rack Out 4
N.2 -2
I/O Expansion Connections
Local Expansion with a PiC9XX
The connections made from the PiC9XX communications connector on the CPU module in the master rack to the twisted pair connector on the I/O driver in an expansion rack is shown in Figure N2-2. This represents a system with only one expansion rack in the loop. If more racks were included in the system, they would be wired similarly running the twisted pair out of expansion rack 1 to the twisted pair in of expansion rack 2, and so on until the final expansion rack is wired. The twisted pair out of the final rack is run to the twisted pair in of the master rack so that a loop is created.
Figure N2-2. Twisted Pair Connections for Local I/O Expansion (PiC9XX to PiC9XX)
Master Rack PiC9XX CPU
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
INOUT
Expansion Rack I/O driver
I/O Driver
DIAG CONFIG DATA IN DATA OUT
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
IN OUT
RS232
PIC900
TM
In
Out
In
Out
N.2 -3
I/O Expansion Connections
Local Expansion with a PiC9XX and a PiC90
The connections made from the PiC9XX communications connector on the CPU module in the master rack to the twisted pair connector on the PiC90 RSM I/O driver in an expansion rack is shown in Figure N2-3. This represents a system with only one expansion rack in the loop. If more racks were included in the system, they would be wired similarly running the twisted pair out of expansion rack 1 to the twisted pair in of expansion rack 2, and so on until the final expansion rack is wired. The twisted pair out of the final rack is run to the twisted pair in of the master rack so that a loop is created.
Figure N2-3. Twisted Pair Connections for Local I/O Expansion (PiC9XX to PiC90)
Master Rack PiC9XX CPU
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
Expansion Rack RSM I/O driver
RSM I/O
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
IN OUT
DIAG PWR/SCAN CONFIG DATA IN/OUT
RS232 Run Stop
PIC900
TM
I/O local expansion twisted pair out
ON OFF
I/O local expansion twisted pair in
L / LINE1 N / LINE2 E / GRND
I/O local expansion twisted pair out I/O local expansion twisted pair in
In
Out In
Out
N.2 -4
I/O Expansion Connections
Remote I/O Expansion
When isolation is required or the segments from rack to rack are more than 40 feet (12 m), fiber optic cable is used. The fiber optic connectors are found on the bottom of the PIC900 modules. Fiber optic segments can be up to 2,000 feet (610 m) in length. The total loop length should be less than 4,000 feet (1,210 m). One layout possibility is illustrated in Figure N2-4. Notice that the expansion system forms a loop with the expansion rack seven connected to the master rack. A loop configuration is required for all expansion systems.
Figure N2-4. Remote I/O layout for a PIC900 master rack
PiC9XX Master Rack
In Out
PiC9XX Expansion Rack 1
In Out
PiC9XX Expansion Rack 2
In Out
PiC9XX Expansion Rack 5
Out In
PiC9XX Expansion Rack 4
Out In
PiC9XX Expansion Rack 3
Out In
PiC9XX Expansion Rack 7
Out In
PiC9XX Expansion Rack 6
Out In
A fiber optic segment can be up to 2000' maximum. However, the total loop length should be less than 4000'.
N.2 -5
I/O Expansion Connections
Fiber Optic Cables
Fiber optic cables for remote I/O expansion are available in various lengths with connectors attached. It is also possible to order the cable and connectors separately.
Item Part number
Cable with connectors 502-037XY-YY* Cable Connector 401-54631-00 401-54652-00
*The XY-YY part of the part number allows you to enter the length of the cable you are ordering. Cable can be ordered any length from 4 feet to 2,000 feet. The X may be a 0, 1, or 2. The Ys may be any digit from 0 to 9. For example, to order a 4 foot cable, the part number would be: 502-03700-04 To order a 1,234 foot cable, the part number would be: 502-03712-34 If fabricating your own cable, it must have the characteristics shown in the fiber optic cable specification table.
Handling Precautions
When working with fiber optic cable, the following precautions should be followed.
1. 2. 3. 4.
Keep the slip covers on the ends of the connectors until ready to hook up. When routing cable through difficult runs, use a simplex pulling grip. Do not exceed the recommended tensile strength. (Tensile strength is the ability of a fiber to be stretched or pulled without breaking.) Do not exceed the recommended bend radius. (Bend radius is a limit on how much the fiber should be bent. Bends increase attenuation slightly and decrease tensile strength.) Bends tighter than a 2 inch radius may cause permanent damage to the cable
See the fiber optic cable specification table at the end of this appendix.
Connecting ST Style Fiber Optic Connector to the Module Connector
The procedure for connecting the ST style connector to the module connector is as follows:
1. 2.
Remove the protective cap from the ceramic tip of the ST style connector. Find the slot on the module connector and line up the notch on the ST style connector with it.
N.2 -6
I/O Expansion Connections
3.
Push the spring-loaded latch section of the ST connector up to the notch on the module connector and twist to lock in place.
Figure N2-5. Connecting Fiber Optic Cable to Module
Connector on module Notch to lock latch onto Latch
Slot Ceramic end of fiber optic cable Notch to slide into slot above
ST style connector on fiber optic cable
AA842-1191
N.2 -7
I/O Expansion Connections
For remote I/O expansion, the I/O expansion fiber optic in and out cables are connected to the connectors located on the bottom of the module as shown in Figure N2-6.
Figure N2-6. Fiber Optic Connections for PiC9XX Remote I/O Expansion
Expansion Rack I/O driver
I/O Driver
Master Rack PiC9XX CPU
CPU
DIAG
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
CONFIG DATA IN DATA OUT
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
IN OUT
RS232
PIC900
TM
In In Out
Out
N.2 -8
I/O Expansion Connections
Peer-to-Peer and Remote I/O Expansion
Figure N2-7 illustrates both peer-to-peer and I/O expansion with the PiC9XX with communication capabilities.
Figure N2-7. Peer-to-Peer (between two PiC9XXs) and I/O Expansion Connections
Expansion Rack I/O driver
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
PiC9XX 1
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
PiC9XX 2
Master Rack
CPU
I/O Driver
DIAG CONFIG DATA IN DATA OUT
DATA
TX ACT
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
IN OUT
ARCNET
IN OUT
RS232
RS232
Peer-to-peer twisted pair interface
PIC900
TM
PIC900 Peer-to-peer communications
TM
Peer-to-peer twisted pair interface
100 ohm resistor
100 ohm resistor
In In Out In Out
Out
I/O remote expansion
N.2 -9
I/O Expansion Connections
Figure N2-8 illustrates both peer-to-peer and I/O expansion when the I/O expansion rack is a PiC90.
Figure N2-8. Peer-to-Peer (between two PIC900s) and I/O Expansion Connections
PiC9XX 1
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
PiC9XX 2
Master Rack
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
IN OUT
Expansion Rack RSM I/O RSM I/O Driver
DIAG PWR/SCAN CONFIG DATA IN/OUT
TX ACT
DATA
TX ACT
DATA ARCNET
IN OUT IN OUT
ARCNET RS232
RS232
Run
Peer-to-peer twisted pair interface
PIC900
TM
PIC900 Peer-to-peer communications
TM
Peer-to-peer twisted pair interface
ON
Stop
100 ohm resistor
100 ohm resistor
OFF
L / LINE1 N / LINE2 E / GRND
In
Out
In
Out
In
Out
I/O remote expansion
N.2 -10
I/O Expansion Connections
Specification Table for Fiber Optic Cable Characteristics Fiber optic cable specifications
Function Part number
For use with I/O expansion from 4 to 2,000 feet. Cable with connectors 502-037XY-YY Cable only 401-54631-00 Connector only 401-54652-00 Glass plenum or non-plenum 62.5/125 m 0 C to 55 C (32 F to 131 F) Greater than 2 inches during installation and operation 110 # during installation and operation ST style which accommodates 62.5/125 m size cable
Type Size Operating temperature Bend radius Tensile strength Connectors
N.2 -11
I/O Expansion Connections
Block I/O Expansion
Block I/O is a self-contained I/O interface with its own logic power supply derived from an external 24V DC source. Each block has a communication interface that includes two transmitters (RS485) and two receivers (optically isolated). Blocks differ as to the type of I/O interface (analog or digital) provided. Block I/O is an alternative to PIC900 rack I/O expansion. It is used to distribute small groups of interface logic close to the actual location of I/O devices. It allows you to replace long runs of I/O cables with twisted pairs of communication wires. The Block I/O footprint has been minimized for easy installation into small enclosures or junction boxes. Block I/O cannot be intermixed within a rack I/O expansion loop. Block I/O uses a slower data rate and optical isolation to accommodate longer distances between modules. It requires the latest version of the PiC9XX CPU with the block I/O interface option. Block I/O modules can be mounted directly to a panel or to a DIN rail. The package contains a metal piece that is used to make contact with the module when used with a Din rail. For an alternate connection to chassis or for panel mounting, a terminal pin is provided. Chassis connection is required for conformance to EMC standards. There are two 5-pin communications connectors and four logic LEDs on the top of the block I/O module as shown in Figure N2-9 below.
N.2 -12
I/O Expansion Connections
Figure N2-9. Pinouts for Communication Connectors In (from CPU) Out (to next block I/O module
(twisted pair output)
(twisted pair output)
Pin # 5
Driver -
4 Driver +
3 Shield
2
(twisted pair input)
1 Receiver +
(twisted pair input)
(twisted pair input)
(twisted pair input)
(twisted pair output)
Communications Receive/Transmit
In Out
ConfPwr
Logic LEDs GIDDINGS & LEWIS(R)
OUTPUT 24VDC SOURCE
LEDs
The four LEDs are described below.
LED DATA IN Color State Definition
Yellow Yellow Green
DATA OUT
CONFG
ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF
PWR
Green
Indicates the line is active No activity Indicates the line is active No activity Communication established with this block I/O module Communication not established Internal +5V logic power supply OK No external 24V applied or internal 5V logic supply not OK
More information about using the LEDs for troubleshooting is available in Appendix P.
(twisted pair output)
Pin # 5
Receiver -
4 Receiver +
3 Shield
2
1 Driver +
Receiver -
Driver -
N.2 -13
I/O Expansion Connections
One possible layout for PIC900 expansion using block I/O modules is shown in Figure N2-10. There can be up to 200 feet between block I/O modules. The recommended wire is Belden 9729, 24 AWG stranded conductors, twisted pair (100 characteristic impedance) with shield.
Figure N2-10. Block I/O Layout for PIC900 Expansion
PIC900/90 Master Rack TR
Block I/O Modules
T R R T T R R T T R R T T R R T
The distance between block I/O modules can be up to 200 feet.
T R
R T
T R
R T
T R
R T
T R
R T
Up to 77 modules
T R R T
NOTE: Unlike wiring for I/O expansion racks, it is not necessary to return the last block I/O module back to the PIC900. The interconnecting cable between block I/O modules contains both a forward and a return communication path.
N.2 -14
I/O Expansion Connections
Figure N2-11 shows the connections between a PiC9XX master rack and a block I/O module. To add the next block I/O module, twisted pair wire would be connected to the 5-pin connector on the upper right side of the block I/O module.
Figure N2-11. PiC9XX CPU to Block I/O Module Connections
Master Rack PiC9XX CPU
CPU
DIAG CONFIG
INOUT
DATA
TX ACT
ARCNET
INOUT
RS232
PIC900
TM
Twisted pair in
I/O Expansion twisted pair out I/O Expansion twisted pair in Shield
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Shields 54321 GIDDINGS & LEWIS (R) Twisted pair out Shield BLOCK I/O
In
Out
N.2 -15
I/O Expansion Connections
NOTES
N.2 -16
Appendix O - EMC Guidelines
O.1 -
CE and EMC Guidelines
NOTE: The CE mark on PiC products assures compliance with both the EMC and low voltage European directives. Prior to this CE mark, EMC on the product label only assured compliance with the EMC directives.
Background on EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) Compliance
In order to market products in the European Union after January 1, 1996, an electromagnetic compatibility directive (EU Directive 89/336/ECC) must be met. All products must be designed and manufactured in such a way that:
1. 2.
Electromagnectic disturbances generated by the products do not cause interference to other systems. The performance of the product is not affected by electromagnetic disturbances within the environment in which the product is intended to operate.
The directive refers to relevant harmonized European EMC standards against which product conformity can be assessed, although other methods of assessment, notably the preparation of a Technical File, are permissible. The equipment manufacturer or the manufacturer's agent in the Community must make a Declaration of Conformity and can place the CE mark on the product. Failure to conform with the requirements of the directive can result in a total ban on sales throughout the Single Market and legal action could be taken against the signatory of a false declaration of conformity.
Background on Low Voltage Compliance
In order to market products in the European Union after January 1, 1997, the low voltage directive (EU Directive 73/23/EEC) must be met. The intention of the directive is to assure user safety under normal operating and fault conditions. The directive includes the use of certain warning labels and user instructions. It establishes limits to prevent electrical shock hazard, overheating and fire.
O.1 -3
CE and EMC Guidelines
RFI Emission and Immunity
The EMC product characteristics are classified by the emission and immunity performance. Emissions not only include radiated noise from the product enclosure and cabling, but also that which is conducted away from the product along the cables connected to it. This may be subsequently radiated from the cable or conducted directly into another product which shares this cable e.g. the main AC supply. Immunity is how susceptible a product is (e.g. to the radiated and conducted emissions from the product mounted next to it). To ensure compatibility, the immunity of a product must always exceed the expected emissions in the environment in which it operates as is shown in the diagram below. This is to ensure a margin of safety.
Figure O1-1. Safety Margin
Compatibility Levels
Immunity Level Safety Margin Emission Level Noise Level
In addition to conducted and radiated immunity, products must also be capable of withstanding:
1. 2.
Electro-static discharges (ESD) Conducted fast transient voltages
The discharge spark generated from ESD can easily damage electronic components.The conducted fast transient voltages are induced in cables laid in close proximity to other cables in which large inductive loads are switched (such as relays, contactors, and AC motor starters). This is a good example of what can happen to sensitive control and signal cabling connected to drives when poorly installed in enclosures on industrial sites.
O.1 -4
CE and EMC Guidelines
Classes of EMC Operating Environments
Before the correct level of EMC can be designed into equipment, the EMC operating environment must be defined. For example in industrial locations where high power equipment is in use, high levels of background electrical noise would be expected when compared to a household or office environment. Since it is more expensive to reduce the emissions from higher power equipment than to increase the immunity, the emission limits allowed in industrial environments are higher than for household or office environments. Vice versa for immunity because of the higher emission limits in industrial environments, the immunity requirements are more strict than for the household or office environment. Hence in order to achieve EMC between different equipment, it is essential to know what EMC operating environment it is to be installed in, and to compare the installation environment to the environment for which it was designed. Today using generic EMC standards, two environments are defined:
1. 2.
Industrial Residential, commercial, and light industrial
The environments are locations defined on the basis of whether the AC supply is shared with other locations or is buffered from them with a distribution transformer. If your location is buffered via a distribution transformer, then you are in an industrial environment. If you share your AC supply with a neighboring location, then you are in a residential, commercial, or light industrial environment. For example, an industrial unit which shares its AC supply with a neighboring unit is defined as a residential, commercial, and light industrial location. If it is supplied from its own distribution transformer, then it is an industrial location.
Conformance with the EMC Directive
Giddings & Lewis will comply with the Directive by self-certification to the following generic EMC standards:
1. 2.
EN50081-2 for industrial emissions using EN55011 (based upon CISPR 11A) EN50082-2 for industrial immunity using IEC 61000-4-2 (ESD-4KV contact mode, 8 KV air discharge) IEC 61000-4-3 (Radiated susceptibility) IEC 61000-4-4 (Electrical fast transient) IEC 61000-4-8 (Magnetic Fields)
A statement of compliance will be made with the letters "EMC" or "CE" on the product, but will be valid only if the product is installed properly.
O.1 -5
CE and EMC Guidelines
Conformance with the Low Voltage Directive
Giddings & Lewis will comply with the Directive by self-certification to the following standard: EN 61131-2:1994/A11:1996 Low Voltage Requirement for Programmable Controllers A statement of compliance will be made with the letters "CE" on the product but will be valid only if the equipment is properly installed.
Changes to the PiC Products
Giddings & Lewis PiC products had originally been designed with a high level of noise immunity and tested according to standards such as NEMA showering arc and the original version of IEC 801-2. However, the EU directive for immunity requires testing to standards that have more variables and are more repeatable. The directive also requires control of emissions, something that is not regulated in U. S. industrial environments. As a result, changes have been made to the hardware modules within the PiC product line. The changes have included the addition of filtering, re-routing of foils and/or the addition of ground planes to printed circuit boards, use of some conductive enclosures, provision for shielded wires* for peer-to-peer communication, and internal connection of SPG to field side connectors. *A recommended shielded wire is:
Belden 24 AWG (7 X 32) 9729
O.1 -6
CE and EMC Guidelines
Changes Affecting the User
Many of the changes Giddings & Lewis has implemented are transparent to the user. However, there are some changes affecting user installation. Giddings & Lewis continues to recommend separation of low level signals (encoder, analog, communications, fast DC inputs) from high voltage or high current lines from any of the above. More specifically, maintain at least one inch of separation around encoder signals and around communication signals. It is no longer necessary to connect a wire from a module to SPG. This userinstalled wire had been a source of emissions and thus the connection should not be made. Analog modules typically had this requirement in the past. To prevent excessive conducted emissions from a DC power source (typically 24V) used for digital I/O, a 1000 picofarad capacitor should be used. Connect the capacitor from the +24V DC to COMMON at the distribution terminals. The same applies to any other external DC power source used with the PiC product. The figure on the left below illustrates the connection method before EMC compliant products were available. The figure on the right illustrates the recommended connections when using EMC compliant products. On the right, note that the SPG connection has been eliminated and that a capacitor is connected to the 24V DC supply.
Figure O1-2. Connections before EMC Compliant Products Recommended EMC Compliant Connections
COMMUNICATIONS
COMMUNICATIONS PIC900 SYSTEM ENCODER, ANALOG AC INPUT/OUTPUT
PIC900 SYSTEM
ENCODER, ANALOG AC INPUT/OUTPUT
and MODULES DC INPUT/OUTPUT
to AC I/O to DC I/O
and MODULES
DC INPUT/OUTPUT
to AC I/O to DC I/O
Capacitor
+
AC INPUT POWER GND
AC INPUT POWER GND
+
-
DC POWER SUPPLY
DC POWER SUPPLY
SINGLE-POINT GROUND
SINGLE-POINT GROUND
O.1 -7
CE and EMC Guidelines
There is now a provision for shield termination to the CPU modules for peer-topeer communication. Shielded cable must be used to reduce emissions. Inside a control cabinet, the practice of connecting the shields of shielded cables at the modules should be continued. For shielded cable entering/leaving the cabinet, see the diagram below.
Figure O1-3. Connecting Shielded Cable
PiC Module
External Device
C abinet Enclosure
The two different methods of terminating shields are used to accommodate two different immunity requirements. Immunity required inside an enclosure is considered lower because cables are typically less than 3 meters in length and/or can be separated from each other and from noise sources. Immunity required external to an enclosure is considered higher because the user may have less control over the noise environment. Low level signal cables that can be external to an enclosure and AC/DC digital I/O cables have been tested at a 2 KV level for electrical fast transients (EFTs). Low level signals that can be less than 3 meters in length or can be separated from noise sources are tested at a 1 KV level. Under the stated conditions, there will be no disturbance of digital I/O, encoder, or stepper operation. For analog signals, there may be momentary disturbances but there will be self-recovery when the noise subsides. In order to meet the EU directive requirement for emissions and immunity, fiber optics must be used for I/O expansion. Although the PiCs will pass the electrical fast transient test on incoming power lines, users may still want to use a power line conditioner as detailed in Chapter 1 of the PIC900 Hardware Manual. As a general precaution, do not operate transmitters, arc welding equipment, or other high noise radiators within one meter of a PiC enclosure that has the door open. Continue to equip inductive devices, if they are in series with a mechanical contact or switch, with arc suppression circuits. These devices include contactors, solenoids and motors. Shield all cables that carry heavy current near the system, using continuous foil wrap or conduit grounded at both ends. Such cables include power leads for high-frequency welders and for pulse-width-modulated motor drives.
O.1 -8
CE and EMC Guidelines
NOTE: Shields for signal wires are grounded at only one end, to provide immunity to outside noise sources. However, the shields for "noise sources" are grounded at both ends, to reduce emissions and "contain" the noise. Worst case tests with analog I/O modules have caused momentary disturbances no greater than .5V in a +10V to -10V range and .5 mA in a 4 to 20 mA range. Worst case tests with an RTD module have caused momentary disturbances no greater that + or -4C in a range of -200 to 266C. Worst case tests with a JK thermocouple module have caused momentary disturbances no greater than + or - 1 mV over a 100 to 1. NOTE: To assure compliance with the low voltage directive, it is necessary to follow installation instructions in the controller Hardware Manual. Also refer to any instructions specific to individual control modules.
O.1 -9
CE and EMC Guidelines
Using CE/EMC and Non-CE/EMC Modules
IMPORTANT: Failure to follow these guidelines may result in undesired system performance! NOTE: CE indicates compliance to both the EMC and low voltage directives. EMC indicates compliance to the EMC directive.
There are several issues that must be considered when using CE/EMC compliant and Non-CE/EMC compliant Modules. This document addresses these issues. Module Identification - To determine whether a module is CE/EMC or Non-CE/ EMC, look at the gray Unit Tag located on the side of the plastic module case. CE/ EMC modules will have "CE" or "EMC" printed near the "MAX. AMBIENT TEMP." specification. Non-CE/EMC will not have "EMC" or "CE" printed in this location. Grounding - Due to differences in shielding requirements, it is extremely important to follow proper shielding guidelines for a given module. Failure to do so may result in intermittent operation in noisy environments. For modules that have an SPG terminal and/or one or more SHIELD terminal, perform the following: For CE/EMC modules, do not connect the SPG terminal or SHIELD terminals to the system's Single Point Ground. * For Non-CE/EMC modules, connect the SPG terminal, or a SHIELD terminal, to the system's Single Point Ground
*
CE/EMC CSM and RSM Modules - Using an CE/EMC CSM, RSM, or CSM/ CPU (PiC90) with certain Non-CE/EMC analog modules may cause intermittent operation. Follow these guidelines for determining the type of CSM, RSM, or CSM/CPU that should be used in a particular rack: If your rack contains one or more Non-CE/EMC modules that perform D/A conversion or provide an Encoder interface, you must use a non-CE/EMC CSM, RSM, or CSM/CPU (PiC90). * If your rack does not contain one or more Non-CE/EMC modules that perform D/A conversion or provide an Encoder interface, you may use either a CE/EMC or Non-CE/EMC CSM, RSM, or CSM/CPU (PiC90).
*
NOTE: All modules and backplanes must be CE/EMC compliant for a system to be CE/ EMC compliant.
O.1 -10
CE and EMC Guidelines
O.1 -11
CE and EMC Guidelines
O.1 -12
CE and EMC Guidelines
O.1 -13
CE and EMC Guidelines
O.1 -14
Index
Symbols 10V DC E4-1 connections E4-2 EMC E4-2 specifications E4-4 theory of operation E4-3 Numerics 10Base 2 connection B4-5 10Base T connection B4-4 24-bit counter D2-1 24-bit latch D2-5, D4-14, D5-9 24-bit up/down counter D2-5, D4-14, D5-5, D5-9 24V DC I/O sink C9-1 connections C9-2 LEDs C9-1, C9-6, C9-8 specifications C9-12 theory of operation C9-6 24V DC I/O source C10-1 connections C10-2 LEDs C10-1, C10-5 specifications C10-11 theory of operation C10-5 3-pin power connector A1-2, A5-2, A8-2 4-20mA output E5-1 connections E5-2 specifications E5-5 theory of operation E5-4 A absolute encoders C7-1 active hub N1-2, N1-8 amplifier scale D7-1 analog in/out E6-1 connections E6-2 analog in E6-4 analog out E6-4 current input E6-5 voltage input E6-5 specifications E6-8 theory of operation analog in E6-7
analog out E6-7 analog input E1-1 connections E1-2, E1-5 analog output device E1-4 potentiometer E1-7 specifications E1-8 theory of operation E1-7 analog output receiving devices E4-3 analog voltage output device E6-4 application program define 1-9 executing A6-1 arc suppression C3-5, C3-6 ARCNET A6-2, N1-13 active LED PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 communications A8-3 transmit LED PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 AUI connection B4-4 B barrier module EMC G-3 battery disposal A1-6, A8-11 LED A8-5 CSM A1-3 position CSM A1-5 PiC9041/9043 A8-9 replacement CSM A1-4 PiC9041/9043 A8-8 block I/O connections N2-13 expansion A8-3 LEDs N2-13 BNC connector N1-9 C cable PiCPro A6-2, A8-3
i
clamping diode E5-4 clock time-of-day A1-3 coax cable N1-8 connectors N1-8 codes diagnostic M-3 common source connections D6-7, D9-7 drive inputs D6-7, D9-7 common terminal C6-2 communications connections block I/O N2-13 DeviceNet B3-1 Ethernet-TCP/IP B4-1 LEDs A8-6 PiC9041/9043 A8-5 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 peer-to-peer N1-2 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-2 port ARCNET A8-3 block I/O A8-3 PiC9041/9043 A8-2 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-2, A6-3 Profibus B5-1 serial B2-1 configuration LED PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RSM I/O driver A5-4 configuration port B3-3 connection 10Base 2 B4-5 10BaseT B4-4 AUI B4-4 connection products peer-to-peer communications N1-13 connections 10V DC E4-2 24V DC I/O sink C9-2 24V DC I/O source C10-2 4-20mA output E5-2
analog in/out E6-2 analog input E1-2 CSM A1-2 DeviceNet B3-2 EMC O-7 encoder D1-2 Ethernet-TCP/IP B4-2 fast input D4-12 I/O expansion N2-1 input 120V AC C4-2 input 12V DC C8-2 input 24V DC C2-2 J-K thermocouple E2-2 multidrop B2-6 output 120/240V AC C3-2 output 24V DC sink C5-2 output 24V DC source C1-4 PiC9041/9043 A8-2 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-2 Profibus B5-2 relay output C6-2 resolver D2-2 RSM A1-2 RSM I/O driver A5-2 RTD E3-2 SERCOS D8-2 serial communications B2-3 servo encoder D4-2, D4-9, D5-2, D5-4 analog input D4-5 analog output D4-4, D5-4 slider driver D7-2 stepper D6-2, D6-5 stepper axis D9-2, D9-5 TTL C7-2 connectors coax N1-8 fiber optic N1-9 ST N2-6 twisted pair N1-8 control cabinet requirements 1-13 counter 24-bit D2-1 24-bit up/down D2-5, D4-14, D5-5 up/down D1-7 CPU modules
ii
define 1-19 PiC94X Turbo A6-1 CSM A1-1 connections A1-2 power switch 1-28 specifications A1-6 theory of operation A1-2 CSMA/CD B4-7 current leakage C2-7, C4-5, C9-8, C10-7 output device D4-6 sinking C2-4, C8-4, C9-5, C10-4 sourcing C2-4, C8-4, C9-5, C10-4 current output device E1-5 current-limiting resistor D6-5, D9-5 D D/A conversion channels 10V DC E4-1 data in LED PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RSM I/O driver A5-4 data out LED PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RSM I/O driver A5-4 data valid signal C7-5 DeviceNet B3-1 baud rates B3-4 configuration software B3-4 connections B3-2 LEDs B3-3, B5-3 port B3-2 proximity switch B3-4 specifications B3-5 theory of operation B3-4, B5-4 diagnostic LED A8-5 diagnostics error codes M-3 PiC94X CPU A6-6 runtime 1-30 troubleshooting 1-29
differential devices 1-26 differential drivers D1-4, D4-10, D5-5 connections D6-9, D9-9 inputs D6-9, D9-9 diode clamping C5-5, C10-7, E5-4 external C1-8, C5-7, C9-9 input D6-5, D9-5 internal C1-8, C5-6, C10-8 zener C1-8 directive EMC O-3 drivers differential D1-4, D4-10, D5-5, D6-9, D9-9 encoder D1-4 recommended D1-4, D4-9 servo encoder D4-9 single-ended D1-4, D4-11, D5-5, D6-8, D9-8 DUARTs B2-7 E electromagnetic compatibility O-3 electro-static discharge O-4 EMC O-3 conformance O-5 declaration of conformity O-13 directive O-3 I/O driver B1-2 operating environments O-5 PiC products O-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-3 RSM I/O driver A5-2 using EMC and Non-EMC modules O-10 EMC connections O-7 encoder D1-1 2 channel D1-4 4 channel D1-4 absolute C7-1 connections D1-2 drivers D1-4 error detection 1-26 high-speed D1-4 incremental D1-6, D4-12, D5-7 LEDs D1-1
iii
pulse D1-6, D1-7, D4-13, D5-7, D5-8, D5-9 quadrature D1-6, D1-7, D4-12, D5-7, D58, D5-9 specifications D1-9 theory of operation D1-7 EPROM installing A6-9 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-6 programmer A6-7 error codes diagnostic M-3 ESD O-4 ethernet RS232 ports B4-6 ethernet ports B4-5 Ethernet-TCP/IP B4-1 connections B4-2 internet links B4-9 LEDs B4-6 specifications B4-8 specifications (IEEE 802.3) B4-3 theory of operation B4-7 expansion block I/O A8-3 local A5-2, A6-2, B1-2 remote A5-2, A6-4, B1-2 external zener diode C1-8 F fast input D1-1, D4-9, D5-9 characteristics D1-8, D2-5, D4-14, D5-9 connections D4-12 fast transient voltage O-4 faults diagnostic M-3 feedback D3-4 fiber optic A5-2, N2-6 connectors N1-9 handling precautions N2-6 specifications N2-11 fiber optic cable specifications D8-6 FIFO buffer B2-7 FLASH A6-7, A6-10 flash chip
904X A8-8 flash memory A6-10, A8-11 installing L-3 socket location L-4 frequency D1-7, D4-11 fuse C1-6, C3-4 recommended C1-10, C3-8, C5-8 replacing C1-9, C3-7, C5-7, C9-10, C108 G grounding protective earth 1-2 guidelines for using EMC and non-EMC modules O-10 H heat control PIC900 system 1-16 hub active N1-2, N1-8 mod N1-8 I I/O driver 1-19, B1-1 LEDs B1-3 specifications B1-4 I/O expansion block N2-2, N2-12 connections N2-1 CPUs N2-1 local A5-2, A6-2, B1-2, N2-1, N2-2 remote A5-2, A6-4, B1-2, N2-1, N2-5 I/O modules wiring 1-22 IEC C2-6, C4-4, C9-6, C10-5 incremental encoder D1-6, D4-12, D5-7 inductive load E5-4 internal diode C1-7, C5-6 protection from C1-7, C3-5, C5-6, C9-9, C10-8 input 120V AC C4-1 connections C4-2 LEDs C4-4
iv
specifications C4-6 theory of operation C4-4 input 12V DC C8-1 connections C8-2 LEDs C8-1, C8-5 theory of operation C8-5 input 24V DC C2-1 connections C2-2 LEDs C2-1 specifications C2-8 theory of operation C2-6 input sensitivity analog input E1-7 internal diode and inductive loads C1-7, C5-6 internet links Ethernet-TCP/IP B4-9 J J-K thermocouple E2-1 analog input connections E2-4 connections E2-2 precautions E2-6 specifications E2-7 theory of operation E2-6 K key CSM A1-2 Remote Programmer Access B4-1 Run/Stop A1-2 kickback C1-7, C5-5, C9-9, C10-7 L latch 24-bit D2-5, D4-14, D5-9 counter value D1-8, D4-9, D5-9 lead compensation E3-3 LEDs 24V DC I/O sink C9-1, C9-6, C9-8 24V DC I/O source C10-1, C10-5 ARCNET active PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 ARCNET transmit PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5
battery A8-5 CSM A1-3 block I/O N2-13 communication PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 communications A8-6 PiC9041/9043 A8-5 configuration PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RSM I/O driver A5-4 CSM A1-3 data in PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RSM I/O driver A5-4 data out PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RSM I/O driver A5-4 DeviceNet B3-3, B5-3 DIAG 1-29 DIAG. See individual modules diagnostic A8-5 encoder D1-1 error codes M-3 Ethernet-TCP/IP B4-6 fuse blown C1-9 24V DC I/Osink C9-2 output 24V DC sink C5-7 output 24V DC source C1-6 I/O driver B1-3 input 120V AC C4-4 input 12V DC C8-1, C8-5 input 24V DC C2-1, C2-6 output 120/240V AC C3-1, C3-4 output 24V DC sink C5-1 output 24V DC source C1-3 peer-to-peer communictions N1-8 PiC9041/9043 A8-5 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 power A8-5 CSM A1-3 RSM A1-3 RSM I/O driver A5-4 relay output C6-1, C6-5
v
RS232 in PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RS232 out PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RSM I/O driver A5-3 SCAN CSM A1 - A1-3 RSM A1-3 scan A8-5 CSM A1-3 RSM I/O driver A5-4 servo encoder D4-1, D5-1 switch input C11-1 troubleshooting 1-28 linear displacement transducers C7-1 local I/O expansion A5-2, A6-2, N2-2 loss of feedback detection D1-4, D3-6, D5-5 M math coprocessor error M-3 MOD HUB N1-8 modules 10V DC E4-1 24V DC I/O sink C9-1 24V DC I/O source C10-1 4-20mA output E5-1 analog in/out E6-1 analog input E1-1 barrier G-3 CSM A1-1 DeviceNet B3-1 encoder D1-1 Ethernet-TCP/IP B4-1 I/O driver B1-1 input 120V AC C4-1 input 12V DC C8-1 input 24V DC C2-1 J-K thermocouple E2-1 output 120/240V AC C3-1 output 24V DC sink C5-1 output 24V DC source C1-3 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-1
Profibus B5-1 relay output C6-1 resolver D2-1 resolver multi-channel D3-1 RSM A1-1 RSM I/O driver A5-1 RTD E3-1 SERCOS D8-1 serial communications B2-1 servo encoder D4-1, D5-1 slider driver D7-1 software 1-9 stepper D6-1 stepper axis D9-1 switch input C11-1 TTL C7-1 modules, hardware 1-19 diagram 1-17 handling 1-18 installing 1-20 retaining bar 1-20 testing installation 1-27 multidrop connections B2-6 N noise 1-26 filter E6-7 analog input E1-7 immunity peer-to-peer communications N1-2 installation checklist 1-24 sources 1-24 normally closed C6-2, C6-4 normally open C6-2, C6-4 O open collector C7-4 opto-coupler connections D6-6, D9-6 drive inputs D6-5, D9-5 output 120/240V AC C3-1 connections C3-2 LEDs C3-1 specifications C3-9 theory of operation C3-5 output 24V DC sink C5-1
vi
connections C5-2 LEDs C5-1 specifications C5-9 theory of operation C5-5 output 24V DC source C1-3 connections C1-4 LEDs C1-3 specifications C1-11 theory of operation C1-7 P peak reverse voltage C1-7, C10-8 peer-to-peer communications A8-3 peer-to-peer communications connection products N1-13 LEDs N1-8 noise immunity N1-2 phase shift D2-5 PiC system communications 1-9 overview 1-8 PiC90 system 1-8 PIC900 memory organization A6-7 PIC900 power 1-14 PIC900 system operating limits 1-16 PiC9041/9043 A8-1 connections A8-2 specifications A8-10 theory of operation A8-7 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-1 communications A6-2 connections A6-2 EMC A6-3 EPROM A6-6 LEDs A6-5 specifications A6-10 theory of operation A6-6 PiCPro cable A6-2, A8-3 port A6-2, A8-2 pinouts I/O driver B1-2 I/O driver expansion A5-3
port ARCNET A8-3 PiC9041/9043 A8-2 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-2, A6-3 polarity A6-3, A8-4, B1-2 RSM I/O driver A5-3 port configuration B3-3 DeviceNet B3-2 ethernet B4-5 PiCPro A6-2, A8-2 pinouts PiC9041/9043 A8-2 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-2, A6-3 port block I/O A8-3 Profibus B5-2 Profibus configuration LEDs B5-3 SERCOS D8-2 serial D8-2 serial A6-2, A8-2 user A6-2, A8-3 potentiometer D4-8, E6-6 power LED A8-5 CSM A1-3 RSM A1-3 RSM I/O driver A5-4 system A1-2, A8-2 power distribution basic 1-14 filtered 1-15 power switch PIC900 1-14 power-on circuit J-3 Profibus B5-1 baud rates B5-4 configuration software B5-4 connections B5-2 port B5-2 proximity switch B5-4 specifications B5-5 Profibus configuration port LEDs B5-3 protective earth grounding 1-2 proximity switch
vii
DeviceNet B3-4 Profibus B5-4 pull-up resistor C7-4, D6-8, D9-8 pulse encoder D1-6, D1-7, D4-13, D5-7, D5-8, D5-9 signal D1-6 Q quadrature counting pulses D1-7, D4-14 encoder D1-6, D1-7, D4-12, D5-7, D5-8, D5-9 phase output D3-6 signal D1-6 R RAMDISK EPROM memory A6-6 RC bypass C3-6 receiving devices analog output E4-3 differential E4-3 single-ended E4-3 reference phase output D3-6 relay output C6-1 connections C6-2 LEDs C6-1, C6-5 specifications C6-5 theory of operation C6-4 relays form A type C6-1, C6-2 form C type C6-1 common terminal C6-2 normally closed C6-2 normally open C6-2 remote I/O expansion A6-4 fiber optic connection A6-4 Remote Programmer Access key B4-1 resistance temperature detector E3-1 resistive load C1-7 resistor current sensing E1-1 current-limiting D6-5, D9-5 pull-up C7-4, D6-8, D9-8 resolver D2-1, D2-4, D3-6
connections D2-2 specifications D2-6 theory of operation D2-5 resolver multi-channel D3-1 specifications D3-7 theory of operation D3-6 retention screws 1-23 RFI emission O-3 immunity O-3 ring topology N2-1 RJ11 modular plug N1-9 rocker switch A5-5, A8-7 CSM power A1-2 rotor coil D3-6 RS232 in LED PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RS232 interface B2-2 RS232 out LED PiC9041/9043 A8-6 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-5 RS232 port ethernet B4-6 RS422/485 interface B2-2 RSM A1-1 connections A1-2 specifications A1-6 theory of operation A1-2 RSM I/O driver A5-1 connections A5-2 LEDs A5-3 specifications A5-5 theory of operation A5-5 RTD E3-1 connections E3-2 EMC E3-2 lead compensation E3-3 noise reduction E3-2 precautions E3-5 specifications E3-5 theory of operation E3-4
viii
S scale amplifier D7-1 scan LED A8-5 CSM A1-3 RSM I/O driver A5-4 scan control LED A1-3 Run/Stop key A1-2 SERCOS D8-1 connections D8-2 specifications D8-4 theory of operation D8-3 SERCOS port D8-2 serial communications B2-1 connections B2-3 specifications B2-8 theory of operation B2-7 serial port A6-2, A8-2, D8-2 servo encoder D4-1, D5-1 analog input connections D4-5 analog output connections D4-4 connections D4-2, D5-2, D5-4 analog output D5-4 drivers D4-9 LEDs D4-1, D5-1 specifications D4-15, D5-10 theory of operation D4-14, D5-9 analog input D4-13 analog output D4-13, D5-8 signal fast input D1-1, D4-9 feedback D7-1 pairs D1-2, D2-2, D3-3 pulse D1-6 quadrature D1-6 resolver D2-2 sine wave D2-4, D2-5, D3-1, D3-6 sinusoidal D7-1 square wave D1-6, D4-12 thermocouple E2-2 sine wave signal D2-4, D2-5, D3-1, D3-6 single point ground (SPG) checklist 1-16
ix
data protection 1-25 diagram 1-14 single-ended devices 1-26 single-ended drivers D1-4, D4-11, D5-5, D68, D9-8 slider driver D7-1 connections D7-2 specifications D7-7 theory of operation D7-6 specifications (IEEE802.3 Ethernet-TCP/IP) B4-3 10V DC E4-4 24V DC I/O sink C9-12 24V DC I/O source C10-11 4-20mA output E5-5 analog in/out E6-8 analog input E1-8 CSM A1-6 DeviceNet B3-5 encoder D1-9 Ethernet-TCP/IP B4-8 fiber optic N2-11 I/O driver B1-4 input 120V AC C4-6 input 24V DC C2-8 J-K thermocouple E2-7 output 120/240V AC C3-9 output 24V DC sink C5-9 output 24V DC source C1-11 PiC9041/9043 A8-10 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-10 Profibus B5-5 relay output C6-5 resolver D2-6 resolver multi-channel D3-7 RSM A1-6 RSM I/O driver A5-5 RTD E3-5 SERCOS D8-4 fiber optic D8-6 serial communications B2-8 servo encoder D4-15, D5-10 slider driver D7-7 stepper D6-11 stepper axis D9-11 switch input C11-2
TTL C7-7 square wave signal D1-6, D4-12 ST connector N1-10, N2-6 stator coil D2-4, D3-6 stepper D6-1 connections D6-2, D6-5 specifications D6-11 theory of operation D6-10 stepper axis D9-1 connections D9-2, D9-5 specifications D9-11 theory of operation D9-10 switch main disconnect 1-14, A1-2 wiring modules 1-28 RSM power A1 - A1-2 switch input C11-1 LEDs C11-1 specifications C11-2 theory of operation C11-1 system rack dimensions 1-10 functions 1-10 power supply 1-14 requirements 1-13 system safety 1-2 T time/date stamp A6-7 time-of-day clock CSM A1-3 PiC9041/9043 A8-7 topology bus N1-3, N1-5, N1-6, N1-7 communication N1-3 distributed star N1-4 distributed star/bus N1-4, N1-11, N1-12 ring N2-1 star N1-3 totem pole C7-4 transducers linear displacement C7-1 troubleshooting hardware 1-30 LEDs 1-28 TTL C7-1
connections C7-2 specifications C7-7 theory of operation C7-6 twisted pair A5-2 size N1-14 U up/down counter D1-7 user port A6-2, A8-3 V valid data signal C7-5 voltage fast transient O-4 peak reverse C1-7, C10-8 voltage dividers D6-9, D9-9 W wire segment N1-2 wiring 10V DC E4-2 24V DC I/O sink C9-2 24V DC I/O source C10-2 4-20mA output E5-2 analog in/out E6-2 analog input E1-2 CSM A1-2 encoder D1-2 input 120V AC C4-2 input 12V DC C8-2 input 24V DC C2-2 jig I-3 J-K thermocouple E2-2 output 120/240V AC C3-2 output 24V DC sink C5-2 output 24V DC source C1-4 PiC9041/9043 A8-2 PiC94X Turbo CPU A6-2 relay output C6-2 resolver D2-2 RSM A1-2 RSM I/O driver A5-2 RTD E3-2 servo encoder D4-2 slider driver D7-2 TTL C7-2
x
worksheets 1-22 worksheets wiring H-3 workstation
power 1-14 Z zener diode C1-8
xi
NOTES
xii


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